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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 

January 5, 1963, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, 

U of M, Amherst 



PRESENT: Trustees Crowley, Haigis, Brown, 
Schuck, President Lederle, 
Treasurer Johnson, Provost Woods ide, 
Secretary Ryan 

The meeting was called to order by Chairman Crowley. 

The Chairman asked the Provost to present to the 
committee the question of a policy on compensation for certain 
additional professional services by faculty members of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts. The committee had received the policy 
recommendations in advance and asked for clarifications from the 
Provost. In response to questions, the Provost indicated that the 
recommended policy was similar to that employed at other educa- 
tional institutions. Approval of the Dean of each School or Colleg£ 
is required before a faculty member may engage in additional pro- 
fessional activities whether compensated or not. On motion being 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of adoption of the Policy on 
Compensation for Certain Additional 
Professional Services as stated in 
Document 63-062. 

The Chairman asked the President to present personnel 
actions. The President asked the committee to recommend to the 
Board that certain salary adjustment actions be taken under the 
autonomy authority possessed by the Board. The President stressed 
that as soon as possible the University would be on a system of 
general annual review of professional salaries and that normally 
recommendations for change would be made at a commonly understood 
time of the year. After general discussion and upon motion being 
duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the approval of salary adjustments as 
set forth in Document 63-063. 

Upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the change of status to 
emeritus for those persons as set forth 
in Document 63-063. 



2405 



Policy on 

Compensation 

for Certain 

Additional 

Professional 

Services 



Personnel 
Actions 



Emeriti 



Ford 
Foundation 



COMMITTEE 



Graduate 
Courses 



Ph.D. Program 
in English 



Undergraduate 

Curricular 

Changes 



Recommendatior 
on Voluntary 
ROTC 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of the appointment of Michael 

DiSalle as Ford Professor of Practical 
Politics. 

At the request of the Chairman, the Provost presented to 
the committee the request from the Graduate Council for approval of 
new graduate courses as set forth in Document 63-064. After general 
discussion and upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the new graduate courses 
as set forth in Document 63-064. 

The committee received a proposal for extending English 
graduate study to the Ph.D. at the University of Massachusetts. In 
the course of discussion, a number of factors were pointed to as 
calling for this extension of graduate study in English. After 
general discussion and upon motion being duly made and seconded, 
it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of extending English graduate 
study to the Ph.D. level at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts, but to reserve 
for future consideration the approval 
of awarding the pre-doctoral certificate. 

At the request of the Chairman, the Provost presented to 
the committee certain recommendations for changes in the under- 
graduate curriculum. After general discussion and upon motion being 
duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of the undergraduate curricular 
changes as set forth in Document 63-066. 

s The committee received the recommendations of the Faculty 
Senate of the University of Massachusetts regarding the ROTC pro- 
gram at the University. After general discussion and upon motion 
being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

1. That the University of Massachusetts 
adopt voluntary ROTC starting in the 
fall of 1963 - this means both fresh- 
men (Class of 1967) and sophomores 
(Class of 1966). 



* «y ~ c c 2 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
POLICY ON COMPENSATION FOR CERTAIN ADDITIONAL PROFESSIONAL 8ERVICES 

WHEREAS it is the responsibility of every university to promote and encourage 
the search for new truth and knowledge for the benefit of mankind, and 

WHEREAS a state university is distinctive in its emphasis on research and the 
dissemination of research findings as a service to the citizens of the 
state and nation, and 

WHEREAS there is a great need for more highly trained research scientists and 
teachers, and 

WHEREAS the University of Massachusetts maintains and supports a Graduate School 
for the purpose of providing training at the Master's and Doctoral levels, 
and 

WHEREAS in order to provide such training the University of Massachusetts must 
maintain a highly qualified faculty which is itself competent in and 
interested in research, and 

WHEREAS such a faculty will be more productive and stimulating in the teaching 
of students at both the graduate and undergraduate levels, and 

WHEREAS a university is recognized for the scholarly and creative work of its 
faculty, and 

WHEREAS it is the policy of the University of Massachusetts to expect each 

member of the faculty to teach, engage in research and/or other scholarly 
and creative work, and to perform a service role to and for the University 
including the academic advisement and counseling of students, and 

WHEREAS it is also the policy of the University to undertake research sponsored 
and paid for by grants or contracts from agencies of the federal government, 
foundations, business, or other sources outside the University, and 

WHEREAS such sponsored research is of great economic advantage to the 

Commonwealth in that it both supports research that might otherwise 
require state appropriations and provides new processes for development 
by Massachusetts industrial and agricultural interests, 

THEREFORE, it is the policy of the University of Massachusetts to permit 
compensation for certain additional professional services within the 
following policies: 

The first duty and first loyalty of a member of the faculty is to the 
University. He is undor obligation to render to the University the most 
effective service of which fee is capable* No outside service shall be 
undertaken, whether with mi without pay, that might interfere with the 
discharge of this paramount obligation. 



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In view of the fact that the University operates on a six-day class week 
members of the faculty are permitted, when approved, the equivalent of one day 
per week for sponsored research, consulting, or other activities related to their 
profession for which additional compensation may be received., Under no circum- 
stances, however, are members of the faculty to be given any reduction in normal 
teaching, service, or other assigned load on account of performance of such other 
activities. 

I. Research; including sponsored research i. e. research contracted by the 
University with outside agencies . 

1. It is the responsibility and the duty of all deans and department heads 
to give faculty members as much encouragement as possible to do research as a 
normal part of their employment. When released time for sponsored research is 
authorized no loss of so-called fringe benefits should occur because an 
equivalent portion of the faculty member's base salary should be budgeted in 
advance against, and charged to, the grant or contract of the agency sponsoring 
the research, provided, that such charge is permissible within the policies of 
the agency sponsoring the research. 

2. University participation in tests and investigations shall be limited 

to activities which lead to the extension of knowledge or to increased effective- 
ness in teaching. Routine tasks of commonplace type will not be undertaken ex- 
cept where it is shown conclusively to the appropriate University officials that 
satisfactory facilities for such services do not exist elsewhere. 

3. Research proposals shall bear the approval of the principal investigator, 
the department head, the academic dean (or in the case of agriculture, the 
Director of the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station) and the Dean of 
the Graduate School and Coordinator of Research before being submitted to the 
Treasurer of the University for execution. Two extra copies of the proposal 
shall be submitted for the files of the Provost's Office and the Treasurer's Office. 

4. Members of the faculty on academic year appointment are encouraged to 
participate in sponsored research and may, when approved by the Trustees, receive 
additional compensation in addition to the budgeted salary. Such additional 
compensation may be earned during the Summer months (i.e., between Commencement 
and Fall Registration) and/or during the academic year, providing in the latter 
case additional compensation does not exceed the equivalent of one day per week 
during the academic year. Such compensation must be permissible within the 
policies of the agency sponsoring the research and must be charged to the sponsor's 
funds. Additional compensation shall be computed at the rate of 1 /40th of the 
faculty member's then current academic year salary for each full week of research 
service, or l/200th of the faculty member's then current academic year salary 

for each full day of research service. Ordinarily maximum additional compensation 
from sponsored research shall not exceed 25% of the faculty member's then current 
academic year salary. 

5. Members of the faculty on calendar year appointment are permitted to 
participate in sponsored research and may, when approved by the Trustees, receive 
additional compensation in addition to the budgeted salary. Such additional 
compensation may be earned during their vacation periods or during the portion 

of the calendar year when not on vacation leave provided that, in the latter 
case, it does not exceed the equivalent of one day per week. Such additional 



-3- 

compensation shall be computed at the faculty member's then current weekly or 
daily rate of salary for each full week or full day of research service; provided, 
that such compensation is permissible within the policies of the agency sponsoring 
the research and must be charged to the sponsor's funds. Ordinarily, maximum 
additional compensation from sponsored research shall not exceed 25% of the faculty 
member's then current calendar year salary. 

6. When additional compensation is to be paid for sponsored research, such 
funds must be budgeted in advance against, and charged to, the contract or grant 
executed with the agency sponsoring the research. Funds received as a result of an 
agreement with the University for the performance of research are funds belonging 
to the University, notwithstanding the fact that the agreement may have resulted 
from negotiations by an individual member of the faculty. Such funds, therefore, 
shall be administered in accordance with regular procedures governing trust funds. 

II. Other Activities 

1. Members of the faculty are permitted to accept outside service of a pro- 
fessional nature, with or without pay, only providing it conforms to the following 
stated principles. 

(a) A faculty member undertaking outside service shall inform the head of 
his department of the nature and extent of such activities and must obtain 
prior permission from the head of the department and the Dean of his 
College or School before undertaking such outside service. A department 
head undertaking outside service shall inform his dean of the nature and 
extent of such activities and must obtain prior permission from the dean 
before undertaking such service. A record of all such outside service 
shall be reported to the Provost. 

When approved by the department head and dean, members of the Faculty 
are permitted to teach under the four-college cooperative plan at approved 
salaries which have been established by the Four-College Cooperative Plan. 
Teaching for the University at other off-campus locations may, when 
approved, be compensated at such rates as the Trustees may dete mine, 

(b) No member of the faculty shall accept or retain employment which 
would bring him as an expert, or in any other capacity, into conflict 
with the interests of the University or its programs of Cooperative 
Extension and Control Service or the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; 
and if in his opinion, proposed employment might involve such 
conflict, he shall disclose the relevant facts when seeking the 
permission required under (a) above. 

(c) As a state-supported institution the University is under obligation 
to render service to the people of the Commonwealth so far as this 

may be practical. The appropriate school dean or other University 
officer shall decide whether and to what extent this obligation can 
be met in the circumstances of any particular case. 



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(d) The University assumes no responsibility for private professional 
service rendered by members of the faculty. When a faculty member does 
work in a private capacity he must make it clear to those who employ 
him that his work is unofficial. No official University stationery or 
forms shall be used in connection with such work nor shall the name of 
the University be used in any advertising or in any other way without 
the express consent of the University, given in writing by the President. 

2. If University facilities, equipment, or supplies are required for 
private professional services, approval for the use of such facilities, equip- 
ment or supplies must be obtained from the department head and dean. A 
reasonable fee shall be paid to the University for the use of such facilities, 
equipment and supplies. This fee shall be determined by the Treasurer of the 
University upon the recommendation of the respective dean. 



I 



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63*063 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MEMORANDUM 

From; Graduate Office December 21, 1962 

To: Mr. John W. Ryan, Secretary of the University 

The Graduate Council recommends to the President and Trustees the approval 
of the Ph.D. program in English. (See attachment) 

The Graduate Council has voted approval of the following new courses 
subject to the approval of the University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees? 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

281, SEEPAGE ANALYSIS. -An analytical study of groundwater and seepage 
problems related to earth structures. Credit, 3. 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Mr. Hendrickson. 

ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY 

205, PRINCIPLES OF PLANT PROTECTION. -Fundamentals of insecticidal action, 
natural factors governing insect abundance and activity, infection and 
disease development, chemical control, cultural practices, quarantine and 
eratication, host resistance and pathogen variability and weed control. 
Three class hours. Credit, 3. 

The Staff. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

221, ATTITUDES AND SOCIAL PERCEPTION. -Cognitive mechanisms in social 
behavior; experimental and survey techniques in the study of social per- 
ception, attitudes, and attitude change. 

Two class hours; one 2-hour laboratory period. Credit, 3. 

Prerequisite, Psychology l6l or equivalent. The Staff. 

222, GROUP DYNAMICS. -Interpersonal behavior in small groups, with 
attention to group structure, individual factors, communication, and 
experimental techniques. 

Two class hours; one 2-hour laboratory. Credit, 3. 

Prerequisite, Psychology 162 or equivalent. Mr. Lewit. 

2U2, LEARNING AND MOTIVATION IN CHILDREN I. -Analysis of experiments on 
learning and motivation in simple situations with children. 
Two class hours; one 2-hour laboratory period. Credit, 3, 

Prerequisites, Psychology 203 cr l6£ or consent of instructor. Mr. Price, 

2U3, LEARNING AND MOTIVATION IN CHILDREN II. -Analysis of experiments on 
learning and motivation in complex situations with children, Topics in- 
clude rote learning, transfer and retention, and concept formation. 
Two class hours, one 2-hour laboratory period. 
Prerequisites, Psychology 203 or l6£ or 2h2 or consent of instructor. 

Credit, 3. 
Mr. Price. 



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PSYCHOLOGY (continued) 

2bk, PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT IN CHILDREN. -Re view and analysis 
of the literature on personality development and the socialization process 
in children. 

Prerequisites, Psychology 6£, 79 or their equivalent. Credit, 3. 

Mr. Schumer. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

207, 208, THE CRAFT OF FICTION IN THE MODERN FRENCH NOVEL.-The goal of 
the course will be to explore different modes in the treatment of realism 
through a study of the craft of fiction of individual novelists. Given 
as needed. Credit, 3. 

The Staff. 



JJZLL. 



Edward C. Moore 
Dean, Graduate School 



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63-066 
University of Massachusetts 

MEMORANDUM 

From: The Provost Date: December 26, 1962 

To: Trustee Committee on Faculty and Program of Study 

Subject: Curricular Changes 

The following curricular changes are recommended for approval: 

A. In the College of Arts and Sciences: 

A change in the description of Art 34 to 

34. (I and II) Advanced Drawing 

Continuation of Art 33. Investigation and development of various techniques 

and media with special emphasis on figure drawing. 

Prerequisite, Art 33. Credit 3 

6 studio hours 

B. In the Four-College Astronomy Department: 

The addition of two new courses, to be required of all majors, with the 
understanding that the courses like 51, 52, 65, 66, 75, 76 will move toward 
the graduate level, and build upon the foundation laid by the new courses: 

63. (I) Mathematical Astronomy I (ASTFC 43) 

Basic topics in astronomy. The restricted three body problem; advanced 

concepts in mechanics applicable to astronomical problems; stellar motions 

and stellar statistics. 

Prerequisites: Astronomy 2; one year of differential and integral calculus; 

concurrent enrollment in Physics 55. 

4 class hours Credit 4 

64. (II) Mathematical Astronomy II (ASTFC 44) 

Basic topics in astronomy and astrophysics. Astronomical topics in atomic 
spectroscopy. Physics of radiation and radiative transfer. Basic considera- 
tions in the treatment of stellar interiors and atmospheres. 
Prerequisites: Astronomy 63 or permission of the department. 
4 class hours Credit 4 

C. In the Chemistry Department: 

A rearrangement of the work in the basic organic chemistry courses, by 
requiring separate registrations for the lecture and laboratory work; both 
parts must be taken by the student. 

51. (I) 52. (II) Organic Chemistry 

Introduction to the chemistry of carbon compounds. Survey of the principal 

classes of organic compounds and their reactions with emphasis on the relation 

between structure and reactivity. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 4, or 26, or 27, or 29. Corequisite: Chemistry 53 

and 54. 

3 class hours Credit 3 






. 



-2- 

C. In the Chemistry Department (cont. ) 

53. (I) 54. (II) Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

Application of the experimental techniques of organic chemistry to the 

preparation, purification and analysis of organic compounds,, 

Corerequiste: Chemistry 51, 52. One 3-hour laboratory period. Credit 1 

55. (II) Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

Continuation of Chemistry 54. Study of preparations involving special 
techniques and use of the literature of organic chemistry. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 52, 54, Limited to Chemistry majors. 

2 3-hour laboratory periods. Credit 2 

D. In the Mathematics Department: 

Addition of a service course 

22. (II) Mathematics for Business Administration and Economics Topics in 
Algebra and Calculus which are of importance to a modern business curriculum: 
vectors, matrices, linear programming, calculus of algebraic functions, 
extrema of functions of one or two variables. Not open to Mathematics majors. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 and 2 or the equivalent* 

3 class hours Credit 3 

E. In the Microbiology Department: 

A reorganization of the courses in the form of the following offerings: 

1. (I) and (II) Introductory Microbiology 

General and broad considerations and microorganisms, their activities, and 

their significance to human and animal health. Not for major credit. 

2 class hours, 2 2-hour laboratory periods Credit 3 

51. (I) General Microbiology 

General considerations of microbial structure, growth, and physiology, and 

the reactions of microorganisms to their physical, chemical, and biological 

environments. Designed for students intending to take more advanced courses 

in microbiology and other science majors. 

Prerequisites: At least one year of chemistry and one year of biological 

science. 

2 class hours Credit 4 

54. (II) Pathogenic Bacteriology 

Correlation of physiologic and metabolic properties and processes of bacteria 

with the pathogenesis of disease. 

prerequisite: Microbiology 51. 

2 class hours, 2 3-hour laboratory periods Credit 4 

55c (I) Iamunology 

Fundamental study of the nature of antigens and antibodies, their interactions 

and significance in resistance and hypersensitivity. 

Prerequisite: Microbiology 51. 

2 class hours, 2 3-hour laboratory periods Credit 4 



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E. In the Microbiology Department (Cont. ) 

57. (I) Virology 

The structure and the chemical, physical, and biological properties of 

viruses, with emphasis on the bacterial viruses. 

Prerequisite: Microbiology 51. 

2 class hours, 2 3-hour laboratory periods. Credit 4 

64. (II) Determinative Microbiology 

General considerations of microbial taxonomy and acology with emphasis on 

the higher bacteria* 

Prerequisite: Microbiology 51, 

2 class hours, 2 3-hour laboratory periods Credit 4 

66, (II) Microbial Physiology 

Fundamental study of the growth, nutrition, metabolism and respiration of 

microorganisms a 

Prerequsities: Microbiology 51 and courses in organic and/or biochemistry. 

2 class hours, 2 3-hour laboratory periods Credit 4 

95, 96. (I) and (II) Seminar. 

Prerequisite: Microbiology 51. Credit 1 

97, 98, (I) and (II) Special Problems. 

Prerequisite, Microbiology 51, 4 additional credits, and departmental 

permission. Credit 2-4 

F. In the Romance Language Department: 

A change in credit for the seminar from 1-2 to 3 credits. 

A reorganization of the upper division courses in Spanish including the 
addition of a new course and a major change in content in another, the 
revised offerings will be: 

64o (II) Advanced Composition and Syntax 

Syntax and idioms, and those more advanced difficult elements *?hich constitute 
stylistics. Required of juniors majoring in Spanish and open to other 
qualified students by permission of the department. 

3 class hours, laboratory Credit 3 
(formerly 2 credits) Mr. Ferrigno 

80. (II) Spanish-American Literature to 1900 (1963-1964) 

Conducted in Spanish. Given in alternate years. 

Prerequisites: Spanish 25 or 26, or permission of the department, 

3 class hours, discussion hour Credit 3 

82. (II) 20th Century Spanish- American Literature 

Conducted in Spanish. Given in alternate years. 

Prerequisites: Spanish 25 or 26, or permission of the department. 

3 class hours, discussion hour Credit 3 

(change of title and description) 



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-4- 
F. In the Romance Language Department (cont ) 

83. (I) Prose and Poetry of the 16th Century 

Masterpieces of Spanish prose of the 16th Century; development of poetry 

in the major poets from Garcilaso to Herrera Conducted in Spanish. 

Given in alternate years • 

Prerequisites: Spanish 25 or 26, or permission of the department. 

3 class hours, discussion hour Credit 3 

(formerly 89; change of title and description) 

84o (II) Cervantes 

Intensive reading of Don Quijote , Conducted in Spanish. Given in alternate 

years. 

Prerequisites: Spanish 25 or 26, or permission of the department. 

3 class hours, discission hour Credit 3 

(new number and description) 

86» (II) Prose and Poetry of the 17th Century 

Masterpieces of Spanish prose of the 17th Century, excluding the Quijote, 

Gongora and the Baroque poets. Conducted in Spanish. Given in alternate years. 

Prerequisites: Spanish 25 or 26 or permission of the department. 

3 class hours, discussion hour Credit 3 

(new title and description) 

95. (I) Senior Seminar 

Independent work under guidance on special problems in certain areas of 
interest, including research and biographical techniques, A senior course 
for Spanish majors. Credit 3 

(formerly 2 credits) 

H. In the Department of Sociology and Anthropology: 

The addition of a new course 

73. The Peoples of Southeast Asia 

An introduction to the history and ethnography of the native cultures of 
Southeast Asia, including consideration of the peasant populations and their 
expanding role in the development of modern Southeast Asian states. 
Prerequisite: Anthropology 63. Credit 3 

Mr, Fraser 

I, Interdepartmental Course 

69. India and South Asia 

(new title, same description; formerly India and Southeast Asia) 

J. In the School of Engineering: 

Civil Engineering 63. Delete. No longer required for students in the 
Mechanical Engineering Department. 



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K. In the School of Business Administration: 

Accounting 61, Intermediate Accounting I 
(new title, formerly Intermediate Accounting) 

Accounting 62, Intermediate Accounting II 
(new title, formerly Advanced Accounting) 

Accounting 65, Advanced Accounting 

A course designed to give the accounting major a thorough grounding in 

partnership accounting, installment sales, consignment sales and 

preparation of consolidated financial statements. 

Prerequisite, Accounting 62. 

3 class hours Credit 3 

Accounting 67, Governmental Accounting 

Special features of budgetary and fund accounting as applied to municipalities, 
other governmental units and institutions, such as hospitals and schools,, 
Prerequisite: Accounting 25. 

2 class hours Credit 2 

Management 69, Wage and Salary Administration 

A study of the objectives, procedures and problems involved in the establish- 
ment and administration of operative and executive compensation plans. 

3 class hours Credit 3 



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rflTTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

2. That students electing the first two 
years of voluntary ROTC shall receive 
not more than four academic credits 
toward graduation for satisfactory 
completion of the basic courses (the 
first two years) . 

At the request of the Chairman, the President presented 
a recommendation to the committee for granting emergency 
sabbatical leave for Mr. Stephen Allen, Assistant Professor of 
Mathematics, for the second semester of 1962-63, for the purpose 
of completing his doctoral dissertation at the University of 
Pittsburgh. The President reported that Professor Allen was due 
for a sabbatical leave and he has been recommended for it by Dean 
Hunsberger, Provost Woods ide and the Faculty Committee on 
Sabbatical Leaves. After general discussion and upon motion being 
duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that Mr. Stephen Allen, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics, be granted 
sabbatical leave for the second semester 
of 1962-63. 

The meeting adjourned at 2:00 p.m. 



2407 



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Emergency 

Sabbatical 

Leave 




)hn W. Ryan 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



Stephen 
Allen 



2408 



COMMITTEE 



Stock 



Short-Term 
Investment 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
January 7, 1963, 11:00 a.m., Parker House, Boston 
Chairman Healey presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Healey, Cashin, Pumphret, 

President Lederle, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Ryan. Also present was 
Investment Counsel Ayer (Standish, 
Ayer and McKay, Inc.) 

The Chairman called upon Mr. Ayer of Standish, Ayer and 
McKay, Inc. for a report regarding University investments. Mr. Ayer 
reported that since October 1, 1962, the stock market recovery has 
resulted in the amount of Endowment Funds invested by the University 
in common stock moving to 52% of the total endowment assets. The 
investment picture of the University seems to be good although it 
may be slightly heavy in the utilities area. Mr. Ayer pointed out 
that Series E Treasury Notes have a February 1963 maturity date. 
He advised waiting until there is an indication of the offer of the 
treasury with respect to the notes before deciding on reinvestment 
of the funds. 

The committee considered the 11 and 305/500 shares of The 
Society Corporation of Cleveland. This bank stock comes to the 
Trustees from the Emily M. Staples estate. After general discussion 
and upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson be authorized 
to sell the 11 and 305/500 shares of The 
Society Corporation of Cleveland stock and 
to credit the proceeds to the Henry 
Franklin Staples Endowment Fund. 

Investment of Operating Funds 



The committee considered a short-term investment of trust 
and agency operating funds. Mr. Ayer suggested there were three 
possible alternatives for short-term investment: 

a. Short-term government issues having 60 to 90- 
day maturity period and a present interest 
yield of approximately 2.85%, 

b. Commercial paper having a 30 to 90-day maturity 
period with a current interest yield of slightly 
over 3% and 

c. Time deposits also known as "instant interest" 
deposits currently available at a 3% interest 
rate. 



i 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr, Ayer recommended the time deposits and the committee 
instructed the Treasurer to continue the present arrangements on 
"instant interest" with the First National Bank of Boston. 

The committee considered the desirability of reaching an 
agreement with the Investment Counsel for compensation of services 
to the committee, After general discussion and upon motion being 
duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of the agreement with Standish, 
Ayer & McKay, Inc. as set forth in 
Document 63-076. 

On recommendation of the Treasurer, the committee con- 
sidered the question of the Fidelity Bond on the Treasurer and 
other officers of the University responsible for large sums of 
money. After general discussion, the committee indicated its de- 
sire to make a recommendation to the Board of Trustees for in- 
creasing the amount of the Fidelity Bond. After general discussion 
and upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson be authorized 
to investigate college practices with 
respect to Fidelity Bonds, draw up the data 
on a comparative basis showing size of the 
bond, ratio of the size of the institution 
and cost of bonding, and to present this in- 
formation along with recommendations for 
action to the Board of Trustees at their 
next meeting. 

It was further suggested that a formula may be advisable 
whereby amounts below a certain sum could be authorized by a 
single signature with amounts over that sum requiring more than 
one signature. 

The committee considered the distribution of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts deposits in savings banks in light of the 
policy of the Board to distribute these deposits generally through- 
out the Commonwealth and maintain as far as possible a $50,000 
level of deposits in a single bank. After general discussion, it 
was agreed by the committee that the University should increase its 
deposits in banks in the Boston area and elsewhere. Accordingly, 
Chairman Healey and Treasurer Johnson were authorized to move ahead 
to determine several banks in the Commonwealth, particularly in the 
Boston area, which should have deposits built up by the University 
of Massachusetts over the future. 

At the request of the Chairman, the Treasurer discussed 
the status of certain Trust Funds of the University. After general 
discussion and upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 



2409 



Investment 

Counsel 

Service 

Agreement 
with 



Increase of 

Fidelity 

Bond 



Savings 

Bank 

Accounts 



Use of 
Trust Funds 



2410 



University 
Fund 



COMMITTEE 



Trust Fund 

Interest 

Account 



Operating 

Budget 

Adjustments 



Transfer 
of Funds 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they authorize the transfer of 
$3,500 from Trust Fund Interest earn- 
ings to the University Fund. 

It being further 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
make a grant of $1,000 from Trust Fund 
Interest for use by the Department of 
Government for a graduate stipend for 
the current year. 

The Treasurer reported that an audit of the University 
has been completed by the representatives of the State Auditor. 
The auditor's report has not yet been issued. 

There was a general discussion of the summary of operating 
budget adjustments for the period July 1, 1962 to December 31, 1962. 
On motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the summary of operating 
budget adjustments for the period 
July 1, 1962 to December 31, 1962 as 
set forth in Document 63-077. 

At the request of the Chairman, the Treasurer reported to 
the committee that it was necessary to transfer funds from sub- 
sidiary account 01 to subsidiary account 02. Subsidiary account 01 
is for salaries of permanent positions whereas 02 is for temporary 
positions (see attached). It was pointed out that this is no de- 
parture from the traditional pattern of transfer of funds which has 
been true historically in the administration of the University. 
Upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
transfer of $100,000 from subsidiary 
account 01 to subsidiary account 02 to 
meet payroll requirements. 

The meeting adjourned at 2:10 p.m. 




Jt>hn W. Ry< 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



I 



5 t8OT OF MiSMCW'V: • Vl°076 

Si ,- ."•■ ■ ; ■- 



•taittuwy ?, 1963 



Standi sfe 8 Ayer & MeKay, Sue 
50 Congress 8traat 



In aeeordamee with the notion of the Boasrd of Trustees, we hereby retain 

you m flttaneiAl &ounseiors to analyse and. supervise the secnrl&y holdings in 
the Tru®t and <&geney ©pirating ftad of the Sfolversity of Messaetttiset&s and to 
advise us frso si®® to time eoneeraiag the e&snge© tkerain that you way son, idar 



It is our «&ter£&&te;$ that your services will foUowthe gonerel procedure 
outlined below s . 

You will saak© senl*a»neal appraisals and analyses of the 
securities In &fa® Operating Fund as of September I and 



2o fhls Hit will be under your regular supervisions, which may 
lead to purehasai #r sale reeejBBend&tions whenever they seen 
advisable, Sosd Eeesaokendations may be made by telephone 
and confirmed by letter Fia&l decision on any recommendation 
ia to be made by «•• We assy fc&en enter the order® to effect 
transaction or yon are to do s© 8 if we wish you to handle 



3o From tine to time you are to meet with the Trustees in Beaton » 
Mas8aehu$ett$« to discuss investment policies In more detsll; 

It 1$ understood that we shall not hold you liable in reapeot to reconmeadatiensp 
astioag or failure to not except for bed faith or gross negligence:, 

For your services under this agrasa®&t* we agree to pay you $230,00 at the 
&nd of each half year beginning with tne first payment due on February I- We3» 

This arrangement » although mutually revocable at the ©ad of eb>* first yaar 
or at toe beginning of any quarter thereafter 9 1® to continue in effect until 
written not lee to the contrary ia given by one of «*•• 

Xt 1$ understood that this agreement may not be assigned to a third party* 

fesy truly your a 



Kenneth Ho Johnson 
Treasurer 



STAMDISH, AIM * ICEsX , XK. 



63-077 



December 31, 1962 



I 



uBivE&siTO or m&Bkcmssm 



SEINKftfiY OF OPBRATIHC B»»6Sr ABJFJSTMSKXS 
FOR THI PSftXOD JftfLY 1, 1962 TO DrcEM&8R..3l, 1962 



BwwMnaMwuwM H.viMtmmm khib 



1 



$ 600,00 

264 . 53 
25*00 

£5 ,00 

i50 o 00 
4OQ„§0 

100,00 



,000.00 



:,0SO o Os> 



100,00 
] 46 1 00 



Aoootrat 



ftrom 



m 



,03 



10 



»u 



-13 

>i3 
•1,4 



Ssfeooi of Sngia^^iag 
School of Business A*fcBi&< 



• 



School of Physical Educ, 



>f * 



Reserve Aceeen* 

Ope^asioa of Pies*§ 

Reserve Ae&euafc 
Reserve Aeeetmc 
Reserve Ae^ouat 
Reserve' Aeeeuag 
Reserve Assouan 



fl£feo©i Of S2£JB& EeoaCS&CiS 



Reserve Aesaaat 



Graduate Scfe©©! 

Sc&col of Physical Mm®, 



KJ MIL iW<Pl»l DM wfWff 



go 



Sebeoi of Edu&atioa 

Provost 

Provost 

Provost 

Provost 



School of Physical 
Educatlos 



Audio Visual Geater 

■ideat Persoaaei 
Graduate ggfoooi 



Audio Visual Cester 



Provost 

Audio Visual Ceater 
Reserve Ac@ouut 
Reserve Aseouat 



era b®%mim subs 
aeeeg@&r^ during 



63»Q78 



WIVBEtSOT OF ^SSACHOSBTTS 



Prior Year Transfers in Appropriation 
From Subsidiary Aseeunfc *01, Salaries t Permanent Positions to 

Subsidiary Account <*02 D Salaries » Temporary Positions 



Data ^^Si 

Decenbar 5 9 193? fX5©,000 o 00 

May 22, 1958 13»0Qp o Q0 

$i$5 8 000,00 
Fiscal Year 1959 



a.iu bmh.sd 



&pril s 1959 I 30 D 000 o 00 

April, 1960 ' $ 3? 9 000o00 

From Salary Reserve $ 61»?44»00 



Hovec&er 20, 1961 |$00 9 090o00 



January I0 t 1963 



[ 



I 



I 



63-074 
November 7* 1962 



ttmt & Agmcy Jfaad Investmente 
(Opaaratlng Aceotmt) 



liSS^M-i^tllimHM 



$300,000 B S a fteawvy Bills dise 7/15/63 

300 £ ;000 Bo So %TcmuTf Bills dsaa 10/13/63 

200j000 CX ? e &e 11/ 1 5/ 63 ^* S Treasuijy - CertlllcBte of Iade&tedacae 

200^000 Bo S c Draasuxy Beta® due 5/15/ $3 



$1- 000.000 



$400 s 000 W*et of Boston 
300,, 000 State Stffeat 



8700,000 



$144^,272 Aaste@& Savings** 

?0 5 000 Zaetfeanpton Savings* 

50,000 Itiagleatovn Savings 

100^809 Uexronoeo Savings* 

50 s 000 Bay State Savingn 

'. 66^175 War© Savings - 



1481,257 

Xotal laveated \18l ft 257 



* f&ea« a«e«mv dll be m&nmd to the $50*000 fig*^ 
as ^eetsested fey £fee finance Ccsmi&tee en appifopsifc- 



iterant inter eat earning on feoa^a a@«o-<ai% is %%* &i' 
otfee? aceoants ate enrrently earning 4% c 



I 



63-073 
January 3, 1963 



i 



UNIVERSITY. 0£ MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUST im AGEHCY FUHDS 

estimated €£se for shgrt-tbbu im&mm 



Anticipated 

Balances 

all fexds 



Weak ,g| 

1263 

Jen 5 
12 
19 
26 
2 
9 

16 

23 

2 

9 

16 
23 
30 
6 
13 
20 



Febc 



i 



ftp ■ 



May 4 

11 
18 
25 

June I 
8 

15 
22 
29 

July 5 
12 
19 



jsL 



$2,198,592 

2*4948,480 
2p "11*. 927 

2 ,989 .,851 

2*989 .» 895 
2,990,515 

2*884,817 
2,906,461 
2 g 825. 147 
2, 783 ? 203 
2,564,414 
2,475 s 770 
2*485,590 
2*390,598 
2,316,610 
2,270,298 
2*229/145 
2,117,381 

2> 113, 342 

2*090*878 

2,027,859 

1,944,328 
1,961,354 
1,917,998 
1,868*414 
1,878,000 
X B 880 9 0Q0 
1,830*000 



i 

Current 
Investment 



(Gross) 
Uninvested 
Balance 



$23 181,257 $ 17,336 

313,224 

730,671 

808*595 

808 s 639 

809 s,259 

730,065 

703, 561 

725,205 

643,891 

601*947 

383*158 

294*514 

304,334 

209,342 

135,354 

«-. 89,042 

47 , 889 

"-*» -63 5 875 

-65 ff 914 

-90,378 

-153„399 

~236 9 928 

-219 9 902 

— » -263 s 358 

-312,842 

-393,256 

- 301,256 

•31,256 



Proposed Uninvested 
Investment Balance 
(Tentative) (Met) 



300,000 
600,000 

600 8 0G0 
600,000 
600 & 000 
600,000 
60O 9 O0O 
600^000 
500 9 000 
500*000 
400,000 
300,000 
300*000 
200*000 
100,000 
1.00,000 



w m 



$ 



17,336 
13 9 224 

130,671 
208 3 595 
208 9 639 
209^259 
130,065 
103,561 
125,205 
143,891 
101,947 
-16,842 

-5,486 
4 ? 334 
9,342 

35,354 
-10,958 

47.889 



data) 

**> 

CKX* 
«Btf» 



300,000 Trees* Bi 



COMMITTEE 



2411 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
February 12, 1963, 11:30 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Trustees Lederle, Healey (Chairman), 
Pumphret, and Brett, Provost Woodside 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Ryan and 
Mr. Collins Graham and Mr. Miles of 
the firm of Boit, Dalton & Church 

The main purpose of the meeting of the Finance Committee 
was to discuss appropriate bonding for officials of the University 
of Massachusetts and to consider any steps which may be necessary 
to provide this coverage. The present bond status of the Univer- 
sity provides, among other things, a $20,000 blanket fidelity bond 
covering all employees. At the instruction of the Treasurer pur- 
suant to the order of the committee, a binder had been obtained to 
increase this to $100,000 blanket fidelity bond. In the course of 
the discussion, it was pointed out that it is becoming common 
practice among large private and public institutions of higher edu- 
cation to provide bonding in the amount of $100,000 or more and on 
a broad coverage basis, that is to include more than the coverage 
under a fidelity bond. The members of the committee discussed the 
advisability of a package policy which would include, among other 
things, fidelity, mysterious disappearance, burglary, forgery and 
other coverage. 

Relevant to the matter under discussion, the Treasurer 
presented data concerning the cash exposure position of the Uni- 
versity (Documents F63-01 and F63-02, on file with the Secretary, 
being an inventory of cash and cash items for University tellers 
and a statement of the cash flow of the Student Union.) 

After general discussion, it was the conclusion of the 
members of the committee that 

a. Mr. Collins and Mr. Miles would obtain information 
regarding coverage particulars and premium rates 
and present this data to the Treasurer for trans- 
mission to the committee and 

b. If the present bonding company (Fidelity and De- 
posit of Maryland) submits a bid which does not 
compare favorably with that to be obtained from 
other companies, additional bids will be requested. 



The meeting adjourned a 




fretary, 



;4i2 



COMMITTEE 



Transfers be- 
tween Sub- 
sidiary 
Accounts for 
Fiscal Year 
1963 



Consideration 
of Proposals 
to Amend 
Chapter 773 
of the General 
Laws 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
March 26, 1963, 12:30 p.m., Parker House, Boston, Mass. 

Trustee Healey presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Healey, Pumphret, Fox, 

Crowley, President Lederle. Also 
attending were Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Ryan and Mr. Austin 
Broadhurst, bond counsel for the 
University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Authority 

At the request of Mr. Healey, Treasurer Johnson presented 
for committee action the recommendation for transfer of funds from 
the 01 account to certain other accounts in the amount and for the 
purposes as set forth in Document EX 63-01. After general considera- 
tion and upon motion bein^ duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED: To authorize transfers between subsidiary 
accounts for the fiscal year 1963 as set 
forth in Document EX 63-01 which is hereby 
attached to and made part of these minutes. 

Attorney Austin Broadhurst informed the members of the 
Executive Committee that the Building Authority for Lowell 
Technological Institute was introducing 1 islation following very 
closely the legislative authorization with the University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Authority but differing in some respects. Since, 
in the. opinion of the University of Massachusetts Building Authority 3 
it is desirable to effect certnin amendments in Ch : 773, and 
since it is the desire of the Building Authority of Lowell 
Technological Institute to follow as closely as possible the legis- 
lation setting up the University of Massachusetts Building Authority, 
the proposal contained in the material presented by Attorney 
Broadhurst to the Executive Committee was identical to the legisla- 
tion proposed by Lowell imological Institute in the Legislature. 

Attorney Broadhurst then proceeded to go through the en- 
tire piece of legislation pointing out all instances of proposed 
amendment. There was general discussion of the matter and the 
members arrived at a consensus of opinion that further discussion 
was warranted. Therefore, the members of the committee decided to 
meet again on April 15, 1963 following a meeting of the full Board, 
and ins-tructed Secretary Ryan to send notice to the membership of 
the committee to that effect. 

The committee reviewed alternate suggestions of financing 
on a self -liquidating basis the dining hall being designed by the 
Authority for completion by September 1964. It was agreed that this 
would be reviewed further at the next meeting. 



I 



I 



1 



fiX 63-01 
Mareh 23, 1963 



Jo^ 


^StOO&t 




$307,000 


og 


145,00© 


03 


61,000 



mnvsRsm of x*ssAcn?sms 



rORTHS FISCAL YEM 1963 



Ssplaaatleo 

01 $307,000 - X© efface proper distribution to ofcher pay 

roll accounts, ' 

To ©ovisr noosul salsr^ requirements. 

For Student payroll » Four •College projects* 

@sid Uss&er plasaiagi 



01 $ 58, Of.O - gasp lug &© payroll requirements seeded to 

cover operating esjpeases la the following 

aeeoaats s 

10 . 3 ft 0©0 * Travel for <1) stu<!®s£ practice teaefe©£ 

supervision, '%%} faculty recruiting end 

(3) gasoline for plant vehicles. 

13 11,000 • Laboratory eteemieals and supplies * 

14 19,000 * Postage increased rates, admission £©raa» 

eta** of floe siad administrative supplies 
for aeataile departsienta , 

16 ^0 fl 000 } .«-• teatais of equipoeat, student field 

trip®, s&d ©hairs for Cfearfe@r Pa*? and 



I 



COMMITTEE 



" 



« 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Lederle informed the Executive Committee that 
the State Comptroller has asked the Attorney General for an 
opinion on certain questions pertaining to the interpretation of 
Chapter 75 of the General Laws as amended by Chapter 648 of the 
Acts of 1962. The President then proceeded to discuss the 
statutory background, the facts giving rise to this request by the 
State Comptroller for an opinion, and the conclusions of the 
President and administrative officers of the University. After 
general discussion, it was the sense of the committee that a con- 
ference should be arranged between members of the committee, the 
Attorney General, the administrative officers of the University, 
former Assistant Attorney General Cook and certain other persons. 

There being no further business, the meeting was adjournec 
at 3:00 p.m. 




John W. Ryan 
Se<Jretary, Board of Trustees 



2413 



Attorney 
General's 
opinion 
relative to 
Chapter 75 
as amended 
by Chapter 
648 of the 
Acts of 
1962 



2414 



COMMITTEE 



Southwest 
Quadrangle 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



NUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & r V^ JNDS 
April 9, 1963, 10:30 a.m., Colonial Lounge, Student T n ion, Amherst 

PRESENT : President Lederle, Trustees Haigis, 
Brown, Schurk. Also present were 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Ryan 
and Mr. Hugh Stubbins 

The first item on the agenda was the discussion of Build- 
in^ Authority projects. . Nubbins was invited to comment on the 
Dinin° Commons project planned for September 1964. Mr. ^tubbins re 
ported that working dr^ s were well developed. Sketches of the 
building and floor plans were presented for the view of the members 
of the committee. The site plan for the Dinin- Commons as prepared 
by Sasaki, Walker & Associates was presented to the committee. 
Mr. Stubbins reported that the facility would have a seating capacit) 
of 1,000 and a serving capacity of 2,500. 'r^asurer Johnson re- 
ported that the University of Massachusetts personnel concerned were 
well pleased with the plan even though a single floor rather than a 
double floor plan would be preferable. It was reported that the 
building will be air conditioned. An inquiry was made whether plans 
were underway to relate the Dining Commons design to educational 
needs. Treasurer Johnson reported that this was the purpose of the 
design and that the present floor plans contemplated use of the 
Dining Commons in educational programs where appropriate. In 
response to a question, Mr. Stubbins reported that it was extremely 
important to obtain borings of the proposed site area and that a 
company had been employed to perform that service. 

Treasurer Johnson reported the comments of Dean Belluschi, 
the architectural consultant to the University. Dean Belluschi con- 
siders the Dining Commons design to be handsome and generally 
efficient in concept. He recommended further study by the architect 
of some minor matters of detail, that is storage area for garbage, 
circulation congestion, and balconies. After general discussion and 
upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees for 
approval in principle the Dining Commons 
plans and designs as presented by 
Mr. Stubbins. 

At the request of the committee, Mr. stubbins discussed 
the current status of the residence project in the southwest area of 
the campus. He reported that he was handicapped by not having a 
contract for either this project or the Dining Commons project. He 
said that nearly a year's work has been done without a contract so 
far. Presently he is at the stage where it would be useful to hire 
engineering consultants and others, but he is unable to do so with- 
out some formalization of his relationship with the Building 
Authority. Question was raised whether the project could proceed 



3MMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



under the old system, that is under the existing financial author iza 
tion of $20,000,000. ^he Authority would seem to have sufficient 
leeway in its present authorization to finance a Dining Commons and 
at least the first section of the southwest quandrangle according 
to Mr. Stubbins. The Building Authority, however, is of the opinion 
that changes in its basic legislation are desirable and discussions 
with the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees have been 
held. It is anticipated that these changes will be presented to 
the General Court this spring. 

At the request of the committee, Mr. Stubbins discussed 
the current status of Project 2, the residential facilities under 
construction behind the President's House. This project presents 
a very complicated problem of difficulties in dealing with the con- 
tractor. Considerable effort has been undertaken to work out the 
difficulties that have arisen. The unsolved part of the problem to 
date is that the architect considers the work on several columns 
already constructed to be unsatisfactory. Expert consultants 
coming in have indicated that there is no feasible way to repair the 
unsatisfactory part of the existing columns. 



2415 



Project 2 



Tt 



[he committee received the report on the status of the 
Sports Facility project. Trustee Schuck reported that moving ahead 
on the project requires the new legislation with respect to the 
Building Authority. Until the legislation problem is resolved no 
move can be made to design the Sports Facility. Except for this, 
everything is ready to go. In the course of general discussion, 
Trustee Schuck reported on the procedures regarding the selection 
of architects by the Building Authority and communications existing 
between the University, the Buildings and Grounds Committee and the 
Building Authority. It was agreed that there will be a report on 
architects for Building Authority projects at the next Buildings 
and Grounds Committee meeting. Furthermore, Trustee Schuck agreed 
to ask the Building Authority to send minutes of the meetings of 
the Building Authority to the Buildings and Grounds Committee as 
well as audit reports, annual reports and similar material. 

The proposal that had been circulated to the members of 
the Board of Trustees calling for an addition to the Student Union 
was presented to the attention of the committee. It was recommendec 
that this addition be built on a self-liquidating basis by the 
Building Authority. This had been proposed by a faculty- student 
committee which had studied the matter for three years, and the 
matter is recommended by the Master Planning Committee of the 
University. It was further proposed that since the financing of 
the expansion might involve an increase in the Student Union fee, 
Student Union funds not to exceed $15,000 be used by the Trustees 
to engage an architect mutually acceptable to the Trustees and the 
Building Authority to make a preliminary study and sketches of the 
project. These would be used to enable the students to see what was 
being planned for them as well as to define the full scope of the 
project. Trustee Schuck and others raised numerous questions 
about the educational values which might be gained from having a 



Sports 
Facility 



Expans ion 
of Student 
Union 



2416 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



larger Student Union as opposed to a smal 1 "house plan" type of 
campus. Assurances were given that all of there question? had be 
considered in the course of the study by the committee and the ad- 
ministrative officials of the University of the proposal. 



The meeting adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 




Secretary, Eoard of Trustees 



n 



2417 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
March 26, 1963, Parker House, Boston, 12:30 p.m. 



PRESENT : President Lederle, Trustees Fox, 

Healey, Pumphret, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Ryan 

Chairman Joseph- Healey convened a special meeting of 
the Finance Committee of the Board of Trustees to consider disposi- 
tion of 100 Consolidated Edison Co. of New York, Inc. rights. 

~abers of the committee waived the customary provision of seven 
days 1 notice preceding a meeting. After general discussion and 
upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize sale of 100 Consolidated 
Edison of New York Inc. rights. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned. 




Jphn 
Secretary, Bo 




Trustees 



I 



2418 



COMMITTEE 



Undergraduate 

Course 

Changes 



Restaurant 
and Hotel 
Management 



PH.D. in 
History 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 

April 15, 1963, 11:00 a.m. , Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT : President Lederle, Trustees Schuck, 
Weldon, Crowley, Kiernan, Plimpton, 
Secretary Ryan, Provost r7 oodsi 



The meeting was called to order by Trustee Crowley acting 
as chairman pro tern. At the request of the chairman, the Provost 
presented for consideration of the committee recommended course 
changes in the undergraduate program. In response to questions, the 
Provost stated that the addition of a new course in Military Science 
and a change in an existing course in Air S ^-re intended to 
help these departments attract "top flight majors". The Feder 
Government will underwrite the costs of these rams, After 
general discussion and upon motion being duly made and s conded, it 
was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees app 

of the undergraduate curriculum ch as set 
forth in Document FPS 63-05 which is hereby 
attached to and made part of these minutes. 

The committee members considered the request of the Dean 
of the College of Agriculture to change the title of the Food 

nagement instructional program to Restaurant a -tel Management. 
After general discussion and upon motion being duly made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of changing the name of Food Management program 
to Restaurant and Hotel Management. 

Graduate Curriculum Recommendation 



At this point, Trustee Crowley yielded the chair to Trustee 
Schuck, Chairman of the Committee. Provost Woods ide was invited to 
comment on the proposal to est program for a Ph.D. degree in 
History. The Provost explained that attempts had been made to 
establish this program as a .-^ur-college program, but obstacles 
exist which could not be resolved. The recommendation, therefore, 
is to proceed with the development of a Ph.D. program in History as 

Diversity program. T n the course of general discussion, several 
comments were made regardir licy and concept of the balance be- 
tween graduate and undergraduate programs at the University. 

sral points were mac 



COMMITTEE 



I 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1. The policy of the University is first a commit- 
nt to a strong undergraduate instruction 1 

caduate program is necessary as part of the 
•\ndate of a state university under Chapt 3, 

strong graduat 

attract graduate stu -rho, in addition 
their development intellectually, provide 
valuable assistance and service to the Univer- 
sity in the instructional and research programs, 

' . The administrative officers of the University 
recognize the necessity of developing a variabl 
"formula" for determining unit costs of various 
programs at the University, and are takin; steps 
to obtain data to permit this. 

After general discussion and upon motion being duly madp and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of posal to establish a pro- 
gram for a Ph.D. in History as set forth 
in Document FPS 63-01. 

At the request of the members of the committee, Provost 
Woodside commented on the proposal to establish a Ph.D. program in 
Philosophy. This will be a four-college degree program. 
Provost pointed out special requirements of the program: 

1. Applicants for admission must be approved by 
all of the cooperating departments as well as 
by the Admissions Committee of the Graduate 
School. 

2, The student's guidance committee must contain 
at least one member from the participating de- 
partments other than the institution of 
residence. 

After general discussion and upon motion being duly made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the proposal to establish 
cooperative program for the Ph.D. degree 
in Philosophy as set forth in Document 
FPS 63-02. 



2419 



Ph.D. in 
Philosophy 



COMMITTEE 



Advanced Study 
in Communica- 
tions and 
Public Affairs 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Provost Woodsi- ". the request of ti -man, discussec 
historical development of the idea of a pr vanced Study 

in Communications and Publi ^irs and the i e of the program 

as set forth in the propose In the course o il discussion 

by members of the committ' number of questions were raised. 

The Chairman of the committee, noting time had elapsed, suggested 

that this item and the balance of the items on the agenda be de- 
ferred for consideration at th t meeting. :qrdingly, uj on 

motion being duly made an'" nd sd, it was unanimous 3 

VOTED: To table the remaining items on the agenda 
of the committee to be taken up at the next 
meeting of the committee. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 




John xa! 
retary, Board of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
April 15, 1963, 4:30 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass, 



PRESENT : President Lederle, Trustees Healey, 
Crowley, Fox, Brett, Pumphret, 
Secretary Ryan, Treasurer Johnson 
and Mr. Austin Broadhurst 

Mr. Austin Broadhurst was invited by the committee to 
present the issues involved in proposals to amend Chapter 773 of the 
General Laws regarding the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority. Mr. Broadhurst summarized the basic modifications pro- 
posed in the statute dealing with 

1. Grouping future projects. 

2. Authorizing the Authority to acquire buildings 

as well as to construct them. 

3. Permitting, should the Trustees so direct, the 

Authority to take over the management of some 
activities. 

In the course of general discussion, the members of the committee 
discussed with Mr. Broadhurst alternative methods of finance for 
various projects requested and contemplated to be requested of the 
Building Authority, and also the management of Dining Halls and 
Student Union expansion projects. Several committee members 
stressed that it is important to make sure that students at the 
University are treated equitably in lodging and dining so that com- 
parable charges would apply irrespective of who built the buildings 
There was further discussion of the advisability of requesting 
legislative approval of an increase in the borrowing limit of the 
Building Authority. After general discussion and upon motion being 
duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To approve on behalf of the Board of 

Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
the amendments to Chapter 773 of the Acts 
of 1960 as presented to the meeting by the 
bonding counsel to the Building Authority, 
Mr. Austin Broadhurst. 

It was further 

VOTED : To approve a request to the Legislature to 
increase the borrowing limits of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Building Authority 
by 15 million dollars, bringing the total 
authorization for borrowing to 35 million 
dollars. 



2421 



Adjustments in 
Legislation 
Affecting the 
Building 
Authority 



2422 



COMMITTEE 



University 

Legal 

Counsel 



General 
Salary 
Schedule 
Limitation 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The committee discussed the advisability of obtaining 
legal counsel for the University of Massachusetts. In the course of 
general discussion, the consensus was that the operations of the 
University, the requirements placed on the Board and the administra- 
tion as a result of autonomy legislation, and other matters made it 
most desirable to have legal counsel available to the University. 
Upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To authorize the President of the 
University to write a letter to 
Attorney General Brooke requesting 
authorization for the University to 
appoint legal counsel. 

It was reported to the committee that Section 14 of 
Chapter 648 of the General Laws requiring salaries paid to Univer- 
sity personnel to be within the general salary schedule caused 
certain problems, particularly in connection with the new Medical 
School. After general discussion, it was the consensus of the 
committee that the University should take steps to revise this 
section in order to permit recruitment and retention of the most 
highly qualified personnel. The President was requested to procure 
a draft of a revised section for early presentation to the Legisla- 
ture. 

The meeting adjourned at 6:00 p.m. 




ary, Board of Trustees 



i 



COMMITTEE 



2423 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY 
AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

April 30, 1963, 2:00 p.m., Suffolk Room, Student Union 



PRESENT ; President Lederle, Trustees Schuck 

(chairman), Plimpton, Weldon, Provost 
Woods ide, Secretary Ryan, also Pro- 
fessor Brogan 

The Chairman opened the committee meeting to a discussion 
of the first item on the agenda dealing with a program for advanced 
study in Communications and Public Affairs. Professor Brogan 
discussed the program and made the following points: 

1. The program is intended for employees of participating 
newspapers. 

2. Several good papers in the New England region approve 
of the program and are anxious to participate in it, 
including newspapers in Hartford, New Haven, Spring- 
field and Worcester. 

3. It would be expected that the fellows in the program 
would usually specialize in government for their 
master's degree work. 

4. The program would provide good training in Journalism 
with a balanced study program in a regular department 
of the University. 

..x.,: <•■ -;-^c- 

5. The program is only partially modeled on the Nieman 
Fellowship being a regular graduate program for 
credit although permitting the student to select 
his major for the master's degree from among several 
possible courses of study. 

6. Approximately 20 students would be involved in the 
program initially each year. Each must meet the 
regular graduate school requirements for admission. 

7. Louis Lyons, alumnus and Director of the Nieman 
Fellowship, has been consulted at every stage of 
the development of this project proposal, 

8. While the newspapers employing the fellows would 
pay for the courses undertaken to earn the Diploma, 
the student himself would pay for the courses in- 
volved in earning the master's degree - that is the 
courses in his major. 



Communicat ions 
and Public 
Affairs Program 



;424 



COMMITTEE 



Ph.D. Program 
in Education 



Ed.D. Program 
in Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

9. This program is a beginning and could perhaps lay 
the foundation for a broader program of graduate 
study in the area of Journalism. 

After general discussion, the members of the committee 
agreed that the matter should be deferred to the next meeting of the 
committee at which Mr. Lyons, Professor Brogan and others might be 
invited to discuss the proposal in more detail. The committee is 
particularly interested in further discussion of such matters as 
(1) supervision of interns during their field work (2) greater 
specification of what this program might lead to in terms of addi- 
tional graduate study (3) possibility and desirability of broadening 
participation in the program to include more than the employees of 
the newspapers mentioned (4) steps which might be taken to improve 
qualitatively that portion of the program leading to the Diploma. 

The committee undertook the discussion of both the Ph.D. 
and Ed.D. programs in Education. The President reported to the 
committee that the University has a mandate to be the capstone of 
public higher education in the Commonwealth. Where educational 
needs exist, the University has an obligation to move ahead rapidly 
to provide for those needs. Education is one field in which there 
is a particularly acute need for a graduate degree program at the 
doctoral level. The School of Education at the University of Massa- 
chusetts has been developed to meet the needs of the Commonwealth, 
and it is in keeping with this policy and highly desirable that the 
School of Education move ahead with programs to meet the need for 
graduate study at the doctoral level in Education. In the course of 
general discussion, the question was raised if it would be possible 
to delay for as much as three years inauguration of a doctoral pro- 
gram (Ph.D. and/or Ed.D.) in Education. The President replied that 
this could be done. He pointed out that inauguration of the pro- 
gram, however, would precede by perhaps as much as three years the 
actual granting of the first degree. The committee was supplied 
with documentation both of the need in Massachusetts as expressed 
by educators in letters to the Dean of the Graduate School and also 
the general balance between the Ph.D. and Ed.D. degrees awarded by 
institutions of higher education in the United States. The 
committee agreed to defer a decision with respect to the Ph.D. and 
Ed.D. in Education to the next meeting. It was further agreed that 
Dean Purvis and Commissioner Kiernan should be present when the 
matter is taken up the next time. The chairman of the committee 
agreed to obtain from Commissioner Kiernan more detail regarding 
the questions and reservations he may have concerning these degree 
programs at the University at this time. 

The committee considered recommendation for approval of 
new courses recommended by the Graduate Council of the University. 
Upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 



COMMITTEE 



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I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend approval by the Board of the 

new graduate courses in Business Administra- 
tion: Accounting 201, 202, 203, 204, 205 
and Business Administration 207 and 208; in 
Physics 203, 204; in Sociology 263 as set 
forth in Document FPS 63-03. 

Provost Woods ide presented for consideration of the 
committee recommendation of the Faculty Senate to substitute "four 
years" for "six years" in the final clause of item 2 of the current 
statement of sabbatical leave policy (University of Massachusetts 
Sabbatical Leave Policy revised June 14, 1962) so that it shall 
read - "and who, upon returning from sabbatical leave shall have at 
least four years to serve before compulsory retirement". Provost 
Woodside explained the background of the recommendation. In the 
course of discussion by the committee, a number of questions were 
raised with respect to overall sabbatical leave policy at the Uni- 
versity. After general discussion, it was agreed that recommenda- 
tions for sabbatical leave policy changes should be referred to the 
Board only after a more thorough statement of policy recommendations 
from the administration are presented to the committee. Accordingly 
the committee agreed to defer to a subsequent meeting the con- 
sideration of sabbatical leave policy change recommendations. 

The committee turned its attention to a discussion of its 
responsibility with respect to its request by the Board for a study 
of the problems of retaining and recruiting top faculty and other 
educational problems of the University. In the course of general 
discussion, several points were made including: 

1. The committee may wish additional information 
regarding both the internal clearance procedures 
in the matter of personnel recruitment and also 
a re -examination of the degree of delegation of 
personnel appointment authority from the Board 
to the administration of the University. It was 
suggested that an outgrowth of the discussions 
of the committee with the Deans and faculty of 
the University might well be the development of 
a statement of educational policy at the Univer- 
sity. 

2. The Provost reported that the Schools and Colleges 
had developed statements with respect to personnel 
procedures and qualifications, and the committee 
might wish to receive these statements. The 
Provost agreed to make these available to the 
committee. 



2425 



New Graduate 
Courses 



Sabbatical 

Leave 

Requirement 



Study of 
Problems of 
Retaining & 
Recruiting 
Faculty 



2426 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



3. The committee agreed that as the next step it 
should meet with Deans of the various Schools 
and discuss with them their special problems. 
The committee requested the President and 
Provost to devise appropriate agenda for these 
meetings. 

The meeting adjourned at 4:30 p.m. 




f Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF JOINT EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE ON ATHLETIC 
COUNCIL AND TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON ATHLETICS 

May 16, 1963, 6:00 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Provost Woodside, Treasurer Johnson, 

Secretary Ryan, Dean McGuirk, Trustees 
Crowley, Croce, Brown, Troy, Athletic 
Council Executive Committee Members: 
Winn, Johnston, Levine, Richason, 
Building Authority Member Gordon and 
Attorney Broadhurst 

Trustee Crowley, Chairman of the Committee on Athletics, 
presided. The meeting began with a statement by Dean McGuirk re- 
garding the status of present outdoor athletic and physical educa- 
tion facilities. The current construction plans for the administra- 
tion building require an alternate site for the football facility 
for the 1964 season. Use of present Alumni Field for construction 
purposes requires relocation of seven facilities: the varsity foot- 
ball facility, the freshman and varsity football practice field, 
freshman and varsity baseball diamonds, freshman and varsity track, 
Stockbridge athletic field, intramural field, and physical education 
instructional areas. 

After general discussion by Dean McGuirk, Treasurer Johnso|i 
reported that all land to the highway 116 bypass has been acquired 
except for two parcels in the southeast corner which is in process 
of being acquired. All land needed for the football facilities are 
now in the hands of the University of Massachusetts. The contract 
has been awarded to Gordon Ainsworth & Associates to design 
facilities for grading, drainage, turf and other matters. 
Ainsworth will also develop plot 2. In the course of planning, it 
has been assumed that state funds would be used to develop the site. 
Construction of the facility itself would be on a self -liquidating 
basis through a devise such as the Building Authority. Drives and 
roads, utility and other matters will be provided through normal 
state appropriations. 

Mr. Gordon, President of the Associate Alumni and a 
member of the Building Authority traced the chronology of develop- 
ments with respect to the football facility itself. 

On July 4, 1962, the Building Authority received its first 
notice from the Board of Trustees with a request to construct a 
football facility. 

On July 5, 1962, representatives of the Building Authority 
and Sasaki, Walker & Associates met in Dean Belluschi's office to 
discuss in general the Sports Facility. At this time Dean Belluschi 
expressed a slight preference for concrete construction rather than 
steel or any other form, but he did not rule out steel construction. 



2427 



Sports 
Facility 



2428 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On July 6, 1962, the architectural sub -commit tee of the 
Building Authority (Mr. Gordon, Miss Schuck, Mr. Beauregard) re- 
ported to President Lederle on the results of the meeting with Dean 
Belluschi and the others. 

On July 20, 1962, meeting in Dean Belluschi 1 s office in- 
cluding the architectural sub-committee of the Building Authority, 
Treasurer Johnson and President Lederle discussed the Sports 
Facility and the procedure to select architects and engineers. 

On July 24, 1962, Dean Belluschi informed Miss Schuck by 
letter of his recommendations regarding engineers and architects as 
prospective candidates for the Sports Facility selection. Sub- 
sequent to this letter, the architectural sub-committee of the 
Building Authority settled on four of the recommendations received 
from Dean Belluschi for interview purposes. 

On August 3, 1962, the list of four interviewees was 
compiled from Belluschi' s recommendations. 

On November 12, 1962, the Building Authority received from 
the University of Massachusetts a revision of its specifications 
and program for the Sports Facility. 

On November 13, 1962, the architectural sub-committee of 
the Building Authority plus Mr. Williams interviewed several 
prospective engineers for the project, including representatives of 
Weidlinger and Salvadori, Sevrud-Elstad-Krueger, and Mr. Amisano of 
Toombs, Amisano & Wells. 

On November 18, 1962, Dean Belluschi had an opportunity to 
talk with the architect Mr. Nervi regarding the possibility of his 
taking on the construction of the University of Massachusetts Sports 
Facility. 

On December 8, 1962, Nervi informed Dean Belluschi that 
it was impossible for him to take on the job. On this day the 
architects of the sub-committee of the Building Authority met with 
Mr. Weidlinger of Weidlinger & Salvadori to discuss the project and 
to discuss possible architects. At this time they were informed of 
Dean Belluschi 1 s recommendation of Horacio Caminos as a possible 
architect. 

On January 1, 1963, the architectural sub-committee of the 
Building Authority was ready to act with respect to contracting. 
At every stage in this negotiation Sasaki, Walker & Associates were 
consulted of progress being made. In fact, most of the meetings 
were held in the office of Sasaki, Walker & Associates. 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On January 21, 1963, Williams and the architects of sub- 
committee of the Building Authority met and selected Weidlinger & 
Salvadori to be the engineer and drafted their list of architects 
in order of priority choice: I. M. Pei, Gordon Bunschaft, Raymond 
& Rado. At this point it was decided that a mandatory legislation 
was required in order to proceed. This was related to the 
financing question which Mr. Gordon discussed. Mr. Gordon did re- 
port that from the point at which final engineer and architect se- 
lections are made, it would take approximately 33 weeks to design 
the project and 12 months to construct it. 

On April 15, 1963, the Building Authority considered the 
question of finance. 

Attorney Broadhurst reported on the problem of financing 
the Sports Facility. He pointed out that if the Authority is to 
build a stadium on borrowed money, it must show that revenue of the 
facility will provide repayment of capital, interest, financing 
fees and maintenance charges as well as accumulate a reserve which 
is required of funds guaranteed by the Commonwealth. He said that 
Treasurer Johnson had prepared and given to the Building Authority 
a statement of student fees and tentative admission receipts. The 
bond counsel considers admission receipts to be too speculative to 
be included in a repayment scheme. 

On the basis of discussion with engineers and architects, 
construction cost of the facility is estimated at one million 
dollars. Annual payment to include debt service, maintenance, in- 
surance, trustee fees and other expenses will amount to approxi- 
mately $50,000. This means that on the basis of a $5.00 fee, a 
10,000 student enrollment would be required to assure the annual 
payment. In the opinion of bond counsel, the football stadium must 
be made part of a larger project with more overall revenue potential 
in order to be financially sound. At the moment, this apparently 
means merging the stadium project with the southwest quadrangle 
dormitory project thus bringing the total of that project to over 
10 million dollars. The present borrowing authority of the Board is 
20 million dollars, and present commitments by the Board against 
that 20 million dollars would raise the overall total to over 20 
million dollars if the southwest quadrangle plus statium were to be 
merged and financed under present borrowing authority. 

The conclusion is that the legislation needs amendment 
both to increase the total borrowing authority of the Building 
Authority and to make certain changes in the other aspects of the 
Authority legislation. The Governor has been apprised of the 
situation, is sympathetic to the problem and will send a special 
message to the Legislature. According to Attorney Broadhurst, the 
Ways and Means Committee is not unanimously in favor of the pro- 
posed amendatory legislation. How long it will take to work out the 
changes, if it can be done, is not known. Both Mr. Gordon and 
Mr. Broadhurst expect that action xd.ll be taken before the end of 



2429 



30 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

June. Even if the legislation is amended, it will still be 
necessary to plan the financing of the project very carefully if it 
is to become a reality. In the opinion of Mr. Broadhurst, there is 
no hope of constructing the football facility through the Building 
Authority, at least as a separate project, unless the cost is re- 
duced below one million dollars or unless the student fee is raised 
materially, perhaps to $10.00. 

Mr. Gordon reported that the cost has been estimated at a 
million dollars because Dean Belluschi and four out of the five 
engineers and architects interviewed said that that much is needed 
if a creditable job is to be done. In the course of his negotiations 
the Building Authority has considered that any substantial planning 
had to follow the acquisition of land and amendment of the legisla- 
tion. Steps have now been taken to acquire the land but the legis- 
lation yet has to be amended. If financing can be worked out and if 
the schedule anticipated by Mr. Gordon is achieved, the football 
facility should be able to be ready for the 1965 season. Under the 
new legislation, the plan is to have all dining commons financed 
under one arrangement with revenues from the operations going into a 
single fund. Another arrangement will be set up for dormitories, 
stadium, student union, etc. Existing dormitories could be included 
in this arrangement with the revenues becoming available in a central 
fund for use for maintenance and other purposes. 

Treasurer Johnson said there appeared to be an assumption 
on the part of the Building Authority that the southwest quadrangle 
will be able to pay for itself on a self-liquidating basis and still 
permit payment of amortization costs on the football stadium. 
Since this requires making a rather substantial "profit" on housing 
accommodations, can the Building Authority be certain that such 
financing is possible? Further, would it be possible to delay part 
of the southwest quadrangle project, namely the Dining Commons, in 
order to bring the overall cost estimates for the stadium and the 
dormitories within the present bonding limits of the Authority. 
This would permit proceeding immediately on the stadium and not re- 
quire waiting for legislation. In the course of general discussion, 
Attorney Broadhurst agreed to prepare cost figures on a per student 
fee basis and other bases assuming an estimated construction cost 
of one million dollars for the stadium and a 20 months 1 period of 
construction. 



The meeting adjourned at 11:00 p.m. 




icretary, Board of T 
Secretary, Athletic C( 



stees and 
ncil 



COMMITTEE 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND PROGRAM 

OF STUDY 

May 28, 1963, 11:15 a.m., Parker House, Boston 



PRESENT: President Lecierle, Trustees Schuck, 

Plimpton, Crowley, Kiernan, Secretary 
Ryan, Provost Woods ide, Deans Moore, 
Purvis, Dr. Brogan and Mr. Louis Lyons 



The first item discussed by the committee was the proposal 
for a program for advanced study in Communications and Public 
Affairs. The chairman invited Mr. Lyons to comment on the program. 
In answering several inquiries from committee members, Mr, Lyons 
made several points, as the following indicates: 

1. The proposed program for the University would involve 
beginners in a Journalistic career while the Nieman 
Fellowship was intended for mature people who had 
already established themselves in a journalistic 
career. 

2. In the course of his discussion, Mr. Lyons said that 

he thought that the support of the newspapers was vital 
for the success of the program and he was pleased to 
note that the newspapers of the area had already Indi- 
cated general support of the proposal. 

3. The reading program and the seminar as outlined in the 
proposal were good in the opinion of Mr. Lyons. 

4. The program as proposed can hardly miss steering good 
people into newspaper work according to Mr. Lyons. 
However, the University can expect some "leakage" of 
participants in the program who will not continue long 
enough to finish the master's degree. 

5. In response to a question as to whether the program was 
"class A" and "best that the University can do at the 
present time", Mr. Lyons said that the program compares 
favorably with efforts with which he is familiar at 
other institutions. The proposed program is experi- 
mental, therefore it will be evolutionary. The 
question was asked whether a summer workshop would 
suffice to obtain the same results that this program 
would. It -was further inquired whether the program 
could be organized as an adult education program and 
achieve the same objectives. With respect to a 
summer workshop, different people would be involved. 
A summer workshop would attract more or less seasoned 
journalists from the area who may or may not be able 
to qualify normally for admission to the University 



2431 



Journalistic 
Writing and 
Public Affairs 



:432 



COMMITTEE 



Ph.D. & Ed.D. 
Programs in 
Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

credit programs and furthermore it would not be 
University of Massachusetts students. The pro- 
spective candidates for this program would be Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts students and, therefore, 
would satisfy the requirements for admission to 
Graduate School at the University. After general 
discussion and upon motion being duly made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of program for advanced study in Journalism 
entitled "Journalistic Writing and Public 
Affairs", as set forth in Document 63-100. 

The committee explored the question of whether time was 
propitious at the University for inauguration of programs for the 
Ph.D. and Ed.D. in Education. Dean Purvis of the School of Educa- 
tion was invited into the meeting and responded to request for in- 
formation from several committee members. In the course of 
discussion, several points were made: 

1. The School of Education had moved to the certificate 
program a year ago which could be described as a 
transitional point between the master's program and 
a doctorate program. Letters requesting work at the 
doctorate level had been received from school ad- 
ministrators all over Massachusetts, particularly 
the western part of the state. Twenty- five or thirty 
school administrators in Massachusetts had been asked 
to express their opinion whether a need existed for 

a program at the doctorate level at the University in 
Education. Furthermore, it has been the practice at 
the University upon receipt of an inquiry about a pro- 
gram at the doctorate level to request from the in- 
quirer a letter expressing his opinion regarding the 
need for a program at the University. 

2. It was pointed out that CAGS (Certificate of Advanced 
Graduate Study) has already provided the course work 
which would be required for a program at the doctorate 
level. Establishing the doctoral program provides a 
seventh year of preparation which would be primarily 

a research year. In other words, moving to the 
doctorate means expanding the program to provide for 
dissertation preparation. 

3. With new additions to staff for September, 1963, the 
faculty of the School of Education will be composed 
of ten persons holding the Ph.D. in Education and 
nine persons holding the Ed.D. in Education. 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



2433 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

4, Even if the Board approves the establishment of the 
program, it may be two or three years or more before 
the first degree is actually granted. 

5. The School of Education at the University of Massa- 
chusetts has an exceptionally good program at the 
undergraduate and graduate levels. It is based on 

the policy that the undergraduate students, for example, 
have extensive requirements for preparation in the 
College of Arts and Sciences. The students preparing 
for teaching in secondary schools must take 90% of 
their work in the College of Arts and Sciences and 
students preparing for work in the elementary school 
must earn 90 of their 120 credits from courses in 
the College of Arts and Sciences. 

After general discussion and upon motion being duly made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of the doctoral program leading to the Ed.D. 
degree in Education. 

The committee discussed the undergraduate curriculum 
changes recommended as set forth in Document 63-101. After general 
discussion and upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of the undergraduate courses as 
set forth in Document 63-101 which is 
attached to and made part of these minutes. 

The meeting adjourned at 2:15 p.m. 



Undergraduate 
Courses 




Secretary, Board of Trustees 



2434 



COMMITTEE 



Building 

Authority 

Projects 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 

June 18, 1963, 10:30 a.m., Student Union, Amherst, Mass. 

PRESENT : Trustees Haigis, Brown, Schuck, 
Thompson, President Lederle, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Ryan, Architect Hugh Stubbins 

The Chairman opened the meeting and introduced Architect 
Hugh Stubbins to discuss progress on the Dining Commons. Mr. 
Stubbins discussed the floor plans for the dining hall and generally 
reviewed features and designs of the building. It is his plan to be 
able to go to bid on the building in the first week of July 1963. 
Therefore, it is antipated that the Board of Trustees will be asked 
to approve the plans and a management and services agreement at the 
meeting July 2, 1963. Mr. Stubbins reviewed several questions which 
had been raised in a memorandum to him by Dean Field. In each case 
he pointed out the provisions which had been made to resolve the 
questions to the satisfaction of the University. 

A general point of inquiry was made regarding the use of 
mechanical disposals rather than garbage collection for dining hall 
operations. A number of factors were reviewed including the re- 
sultant load on the sewer system, the requirement for large amounts 
of water which the University must purchase, alternate costs of the 
two systems and other factors. After general discussion, the con- 
sensus of the committee was that the question should be reconsidered 
for all future dining hall construction on campus. 

Mr. Stubbins raised question of how to approach the bidding 
process and the review of final plans with the University ad- 
ministration so as to proceed as expeditiously as possible with the 
building. He inquired whether the review by the rdministrative 
officers of the University could be made during the first two weeks 
of the bidding period in order to "telescope" the processes of re- 
viewing and bidding and thus expedite action. It was agreed that 
this would be a satisfactory method of procedure on the part of the 
University. It is anticipated that the dining hall will be completec 
by the fall of 1964. It is intended to serve students residing in 
the southeast corner of the campus. Its capacity will accommodate 
approximately 2500 students or perhaps a few hundred more. Although 
the student resident population of the southeast portion of the 
campus is three to four thousand, most of the students who dine in 
fraternity and sorority houses reside in the southeast corner of the 
campus, and thus will not need to make use of the new dining hall. 
After general discussion and upon motion being duly made and seconded 
it was unanimously 



COMMITTEE 



the Bureau quotes one figure 
the construction. A second 
out was that Massachusetts 
the members of firms doing 



2435 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
acceptance of the plans, for the dining 
hall as presented by Architect Stubbins 
subject to review by the various officers 
of the administration. 

Architect Stubbins, although without a formal contract 
pending the new Building Authority legislation, reported that he is 
well along with preparation of working drawings for the first unit 
of the southwest dormitory project. A February 1964 date for going 
to bid on the project is realistic, and Stubbins expects to meet 
that date. 

At the request of the Chairman, Treasurer Johnson re- 
ported on the Fine Arts Building. Hinoru Yamasaki xdio had been 

rarded the project by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
was originally reluctant to accept the project. With the help of 
Dean Belluschi and others, Yamasaki was induced to accept the 
project subject to working out arrangements for an adequate fee and 
ample time to perform the job considering his heavy schedule. Sub- 
sequently communication with the Bureau of Building Construction 
raised some question about the fee for Yamasaki. Part of the mis- 
understanding was due to the fact that 
for design and another for supervising 
minor problem that has now been worked 
requires registration of a majority of 

business in the state, and only Yamasaki was registered in Massa- 
chusetts from his firm. Yamasaki has now agreed to contract as a 
person thus removing this problem. Yamasaki will visit the campus 
on June 27, 1963 to discuss further the nature of the project and 
the terms of the agreement. Another matter affecting the entire 
consideration is that the program for the building resulting from 
discussion with faculty members of departments expecting to be 
housed in the building exceeds the budget for the building 
($2,500,000). All these factors - requirement of an adequate fee 
for Yamasaki, program requirements calling for a building cost in 
excess of the original figure, and others - suggest the advisability 
of considering combining the Fine Arts Building project with another 
project on the capital plan of the University for construction of a 
music building and auditorium. Many of the facilities of both the 
Fine Arts Building and an auditorium are similar. Substantial sav- 
ings in construction could be realized by combining the two projects 
into one thus avoiding duplication of spaces such as lobbies, 
storage, stages, etc. It was the general consensus of members of 
the committee that the officers of the University might discuss 
Minoru Yamasaki and Dean Belluschi when they come to campus June 
27th the possibility of a combined project. After general 
discussion and upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend the project combining the 
Fine Arts and Music Building including 
the. auditorium into a single project to 
be designed by Minoru Yamasaki, 



Dining 
Commons 



Future 
Projects 



State 
Projects 



Fine Arts 
& Music 
Building 



2436 



Business 

Administration 

Auditorium 



COMMITTEE 



Science 
Center - 
fourth 
section 



Other 
Projects 



Land 
Acquisition 



Grandonico 
property 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson reported to the committee that a con- 
tract in the amount of $234,422.00 for construction of a 500-seat 
auditorium in connection with the School of Business Administration 
Building (on the southeast side of the building) had been awarded 
to Aquadro & Cerruti. The primary use will be as a lecture hall. 

It was reported to the committee that the fourth section 
of Morrill Science Center was out to bid. It is imperative that 
contract be let by June 30, 1963 in order to prevent lapse of 
Federal grants to be used to finance part of the project. A number 
of factors had complicated the planning and design of this fourth 
section. The most serious was the fact that the architect died the 
day before the bids went out. It is a very complicated scientific 
building. There are many unresolved details which ca n be worked out 
using change order procedure during construction. It will be 
necessary to have a supervising architect during construction. The 
Bureau of Building Construction will be glad to receive recommenda- 
tions from the Board of Trustees for persons to be selected to 
supervise the project. There was a discussion of possible 
recommendations. After general discussion and upon motion being 
duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that Buerkel & Company, Inc. be 
recommended to Commissioner Waldron 
for selection as supervising engineer 
for the Morrill Science Hall - fourth 
section project. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the report by Stone & 
Webster on steam and electric distribution needs had been completed. 
He will make these available to members of the committee. It was 
also reported that bids on the Food Technology Building will be 
opened on July 12, 1963. On June 21, 1963, bids will be let on the 
new engineering building, project U-59-6, contract 1. 

Treasurer Johnson reported to the committee an offer from 
Mr. Grandonico to settle on payment for his property which had been 
taken by the Board by eminent domain proceedings. Mr. Grandonico' s 
offer is on file with Judge Blassberg. Judge Blassberg, counsel for 
the Board in these land talcing matters, was not present but advised 
that as an attorney he could justify accepting this price as a 
settlement. After general discussion and upon motion being duly 
made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : That in the matter of the Grandonico offer 
of settlement, the Board should adhere to 
its policy establishing a ceiling of 10% 
above highest independent evaluation for 
settlement on land taking actions. Members 
of the committee expressed a desire that 
Judge Blassberg be present at the Board 
meeting July 2, 1963 if further discussion 
is desired. 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson reported to the Board that it was de- 
sirable to take a piece of property belonging to Katherine L. Wojnar 

raisals have been obtained on the property. After general 
discussion and upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the property of Katherine L. Wojnar be taken 
by the University by eminent domain. 

The Board considered the desirability of improving the 
approaches to the University on lands now owned by the University. 
This may involve removal or razing of certain buildings now lo- 
cated on that property. After general discussion and upon motion 
being duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of site development by the Uni- 
versity and authorizing the Treasurer of 
the University to remove by competitive 
sale or otherwise buildings located on 
North Pleasant Street on land now owned 
by the University between the University 
Apartments and Hills dormitory or to 
raze them, whichever is deemed in the 
best interest of the Commonwealth. 

Members of the committee inspected the Cold Storage 
Building and discussed a number of matters with Mr. Hugill, Director 
of Physical Plant. Upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acceptance of the Cold Storage Building, 
Project U-58-6 as completed. 

The Chairman of the committee requested the Secretary to 
send to the members of the Board copies of the proposed terms and 
conditions of occupancy of University housing. Action will be re- 
quested from the Board at the July 2 meeting. 



2437 



Wojnar 
property 



Site 
Improvements 



2:30 p.m, 



There being no further business, the meeting adjourned at 




Inspection 

for 

Acceptance 

of Cold 

Storage 

Building 



2438 



COMMITTEE 



Gunness, 
Robert C. 
gift 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

June 26, 1963, 12:00 Noon, Parker House, Boston 

Chairman Healey presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Healey, Puraphret, President Lederle, 
Treasurer Johnson, Business Manager Grady and 
Herman Pike, Investment Counsel. 

Mr. Pike presented the report of Standish, Ayer & McKay, 
Inc., investment counsel, on the Endowment Fund portfolio. Due to 
several bonds having beer called, there was uninvested cash of 
$28,933.12. Treasurer Johnson indicated Robert C. Gunness* class of 
1932, had presented the Trustees with 50 shares of common stock of 
the Standard Oil Company of Indiana for $1,841.62. Since the market 
value of the stock is $3,037.50 this constitutes an unrestricted 
gift of $1, 195.88. On recommendation of counsel, it was 

VOTED : To purchase at market price the 50 shares of 
common stock of The Standard Oil Company of 
Indiana for an investment in the Endowment 
Fund and to authorize payment to Robert C. 
Gunness at $1,841.62 and to place the 
unrestricted gift of $1, 195.88 in the Uni- 
versity Fund. 

Mr. Pike offered alternative recommendations for other 
investments. After discussion it was 

VOTED : To buy 20,000 American Telephone and Telegraph 
debentures 4 3/8, 5 1/59. 

VOTED : To invest any remaining cash balances in U. S. 
Treasury 4's, 2/15/80. 

The status of the operating fund was reviewed. The pro- 
jections for the current year have worked out well. It appears 
that at the low point for trust fund cash for the year on August 
15th there will be about $1,883,670.00 drawing interest in savings 
banks, instant interest accounts in commercial banks and in treasury 
notes and bills. Treasurer Johnson distributed a cash projection 
of the operating fund for the next fiscal year. Mr. Pike will 
recommend investments. The Committee reviewed depositories for the 
operating fund. On recommendation of Trustee Healey, it was 

VOTED : To withdraw $50,000.00 from the Charlestown 
Savings Bank thereby closing the account and 
to deposit it in the Provident Institution 
for Savings, Boston. 

Trustee Healey will designate other depositories for other 
transfers in furtherance of the policy of decentralizing deposits 
in savings banks. 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Treasurer reported on the proposal from Boit, Dalton & 
Church to increase and broaden the coverage of the fidelity bond on 
all employees of the University. It was decided that each member of 
the Committee would study the proposal further and that action would 
be taken at the August meeting of the Trustees. 

The Treasurer stated that the cash variance of the tellers 
in the Treasurer's Office for fiscal 1963 was an overage of $5.38. 
It was 

VOTED; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
cash variance overage in the amount of $5.38 
as of June 30, 1963 be written off as a credit 
to the Trust Fund Interest account. 

The Committee reviewed the disbursements made by the 
President from the amount authorized from unrestricted trust funds 
in preparation for recommending additional funds for the President's 
use for fiscal 1964. 

It was 

VOTED; To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 

following uses of Trust Fund interest for the 
fiscal year starting July 1, 1963: 



1. 

2. 

3. 



It was 



Scholarships $15,000.00 

Matching Grant- Outstanding 500.00 

Teacher Award 
University Fund for Presi- 
dent's Discretionary Fund 5,000.00 



VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees pay- 
ment of legal services for the drafting of 
tenure policies and other matters in an 
amount of $1,875.00 to Ely, Bartlett, 
Brown & Proctor to be paid from the Trust 
Fund Interest Account. 

The Committee considered briefly the proposal that 
originated with the Associate Alumni that the University support an 
Alumni fund raiser program. Since the Alumni do not have the funds 
to get such a program started, the President recommended using 
$10,000 from Trust Fund Interest to employ a fund raiser and meet 
other expenses of such an office to start a program with the 
Associate Alumni. This should soon bring in funds that would 
support the University's programs. The Committee decided to discuss 
this further and to present their recommendation to the August meet- 
ing of the Trustees. 

The Committee deferred action of agenda items 7f and 7g 
until its next meeting. 



2439 



Trust Fund 

Interest 

Account 



Trust Fund 

Interest 

Account 



Trust Fund 

Interest 

Account 



Alumni Fund 
Raiser 



Trust Fund 

Interest 

Account 



; 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees a 

transfer of $10,000.00 in the 1963 budget 
from the Student Union Service Fund to the 
Student Union General Fund for the purchase 
of equipment. 

The Treasure: reported on word received from Murray D. 
Lincoln, class of 1914, that he was receiving inquiries about the 
65 acres of land he has given the Trustees northeast of Columbus, 
Ohio. Mr. Lincoln plans to convey another 35 acres to the Trustees. 
Offers are being made up to $3,000.00 an acre but in Mr. Lincoln's 
opinion it will soon be bringing substantially more. The Committee 
decided to take no action at this time. 



The meeting adjourned at 3:00 p.m. 




Secretary, pro tern 




COMMITTEE 



I 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
August 1, 1963, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : President Lederle, Trustees Healey, 
Brett, Emerson, Fox, Pumphret, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Ryan, 
Business Manager Grady 



The committee considered the matter of a fidelity bond 
for University personnel. This had earlier been considered by the 
committee. A report was made by Treasurer Johnson regarding the 
comparative costs for blanket coverage from various firms from whom 
quotations had been received. These firms included: 

Fidelity and Deposit Company of Maryland 
Seaboard Surety Company of New York 
Insurance Company of North America 
Federal Insurance Company 

After general discussion and upon motion being duly made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees a 
comprehensive plan of blanket fidelity 
bond covering all employees be obtained 
in the amount of $250,000 at a premium 
for the first three years of $3,393.00 
from the Fidelity and Deposit Company of 
Maryland through Boit, Dal ton and Church 
of Boston. 

The committee considered the need for automobile liability 
insurance coverage for University employees. In the course of 
general discussion, it was pointed out that there are already 
statutory limits on the amount of insurance to be carried by towns 
and counties. It was suggested that it may be wise to consider 
these limitations on other governmental agencies in establishing 
University limits. It was agreed, in the course of discussion, 
that insurance should cover all employees driving any University- 
owned vehicle on official business. Upon motion being duly made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To instruct the Treasurer to obtain cost 
quotations for automobile liability In- 
surance providing various limits of 
coverage. 

There was general discussion of the need for increased 
activity by the Associate Alumni in the matter of raising funds for 
general University use from Alumni donors. There was also a 



2441 



Fidelity 
Bond 



Automobile 

Liability 

Insurance 

Coverage for 

University 

Employees 



Support for 
Alumni Fund 
Raiser 



Z k 






COMMITTEE 



Savings Bank 
Accounts 

Athletic 
Council & 
Student 
Union 



Research and 
other Grant 
Overhead 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

discussion of the appropriate role to be played in fund solicitation 
of this kind by the University, the Associate Alumni and the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Foundation. After general discussion and 
upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To approve appointment of an ad hoc 
Trustee Development Committee to in- 
vestigate the needs of the University 
for increased alumni and other contri- 
butions of funds, to discuss with the 
Associate Alumni and the University of 
Massachusetts Foundation their respective 
roles in fund solicitation of this kind, 
and to report back to the committee its 
findings. 

.■ > 
The general policy of the Trustees has been to provide 
a pooling of reserve funds in savings bank accounts. Treasurer 
Johnson brought to the attention of the committee the desire of the 
Athletic Council and the Student Union to be permitted to segregate 
reserves in their accounts into separate savings bank accounts which 
would accrue interest. In the case of the Athletic Council, this is 
desired to permit building a reserve fund which would support the on- 
going athletic program over the first several years of the operation 
of the new athletic facility in order to permit use of a larger 
amount of the student athletic fee during that period to provide for 
amortization of the cost of the facility. This would have the result 
on the one hand of providing fiscal soundness of the financing plan 
of the athletic facility and on the other hand of assuring con- 
tinuity and adequacy of support for the athletic program itself. 
The desire of the Student Union is based, also, on its anticipated 
building requirements. After general discussion and upon motion 
being duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To approve establishment of savings bank 
accounts for reserve funds for Athletic 
Trust Fund and Student Union Reserve Funds. 

Treasurer Johnson reviewed the policy of the Board of 
Trustees with respect to the use of sums of money accruing to the 
University as overhead provided for research and other grants and 
contracts. After general discussion and upon motion being duly made 
and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
in addition to the standing vote of the 
Trustees to use overhead earned on research 
and other grants and contracts for the 
furtherance of the research of the Univer- 
sity, additional authorization is hereby 
given to use up to one-third of such over- 
head each year for maintenance, repairs, 
alterations and other project costs in 
support of the work of the academic depart- 
ments. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Information was presented to the committee regarding tax 
sheltered annuity benefits which Federal tax legislation makes 
available to persons in the employ of the University of Massachu- 
setts and which recent State legislation permits the University to 
implement. There was general discussion by the committee of the 
matter and the consensus of the committee was to defer further 
action until the next meeting of the committee. There being no 
further business, the meeting adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 



2443 



Tax 

Sheltered 

Annuity 




etary, Board of Tr\ 



2444 



COMMITTEE 



Undergraduate 
Curriculum 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY 

AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

August 23, 1963, 10:30 a.m., President's Office 

PRESENT : Chairman Schuck, Trustees Crowley, 

Haigis, Plimpton, President Lederle, 
Provost Woods ide, Dr. Redfern 
(secretary pro tem). 

A quorum being present, the Chairman called the meeting 
to order at 10:38 a.m. 

The First item of business was Item I of the Agenda, in- 
cluding attachment 64-005, dealing with course changes involving 
proposed additions, deletions and re-naming of selected courses. 

The Provost explained that the largest segment of the 
Item involved proposals for the Speech Department. Careful 
attention was given to the number of credits proposed. Also it was 
pointed out that the apparent emphasis upon techniques was somewhat 
misleading. Currently 18 credits are available in technique courses 
actually the new program would total only 22 credits. The plan is 
to move into academic theatre on a pre-professional rather than 
amateur level, although precautions have been taken to preserve the 
traditional amateur productions on campus. 

There was discussion as to the various forms of coopera- 
tion, in drama, between the Four Colleges. It v/as brought out that 
all institutions conduct excellent work in drama and related visual 
arts, with cooperation being most extensive in staging of pro- 
ductions. 

Additional discussion concerned the relative emphasis, in 
the proposed program, between production training and creative 
work, especially playwriting. It was pointed out that University 
resources in playwriting have not yet been fully explored, but that 
this undoubtedly would be the next step proposed in the area of 
academic theatre work. It was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : That Item 1, 64-005 (A-C) , dealing with 
course revisions in Forestry, Economics, 
Speech, Chemical Engineering and Electrical 
Engineering be recommended for approval by 
the Board of Trustees. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, and upon request of 
the President, Professor Mary Macdonald of the School of Nursing 
appeared before the committee to elaborate upon the proposed 
changes in the curriculum of that School. 



•3H 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Miss Macdonald pointed out that the School was forced to 
recommend the proposed changes due to: (1) limitations in clinical 
facilities in the Springfield area and the need to provide 
staggered courses to teach effectively the required numbers of 
trainees; (2) desire to use to best advantage the 10 clinical facult|y 
members; (3) the need to improve the program content by relating 
nursing to child as well as adult, and thus, obtaining a sharing of 
experience in care throughout the life span of patients; (4) ability 
to provide team teaching techniques in selected cases; (5) desire 
to relate community and preventive nursing to hospital and remedial 
nursing responsibilities; (6) advisability of shifting nursing 
emphasis from separate disease treatment approach to the total 
nursing facilities, approach, in line with the National Nursing 
League suggestions; and (7) the move to place nursing students in 
residence on campus, which while complicating coordination with 
hospital clinical training, provides improved University resources 
for the Nursing program. 

Additional pertinent facts brought out included: the re- 
quired hours of training in the School was well above minimum 
standards; the exceptional records students achieved on state 
examinations (1963 mean score was 601 for the class, with 350 the 
standard score of the State) ; the low faculty- student ratio required 
in this type of professional training (clinically, 1-10, approach- 
ing 1-1 in maternity cases); the increasing number of nursing pro- 
grams also moving away from the segregated disease approach; and 
the low rate of attrition in the Nursing School student body. It 
was moved, seconded and 



VOTED : That Item I, 64-005 (D) dealing with pro- 
posed changes in the Nursing program be 
recommended for approval by the Board of 
Trustees. 

The Committee then considered Agenda Item II, 64-006, 
proposing changes in certain graduate course offerings. The Provost 
explained that the Chemistry course reflects largely the work of the 
Polymer Institute, while those proposed in Engineering were designed 
to keep subject matter training up-to-date in that field. The pro- 
posals in Microbiology come from the work of the new head of that 
department and from a desire to strengthen previous gaps in this 
disciplinary training. Of the courses proposed in Psychology, a 
number are to be offered only alternately or every third year. 

In response to a point raised by the Chairman, the Provost 
stated that the proposed Sociology of Education has the approval of 
the School of Education, although it is not being offered jointly; 
education majors could take it for credit. The President added 
that this course would constitute a step in the direction desired 
for the University, namely, development of research and study in the 
area of student culture, learning and motivation. The University 
should be seeking to develop greater insight and knowledge into 
educational problems, particularly for the benefit of graduate 



2445 



2446 



COMMITTEE 

Graduate 
Curriculum 



Master of 
Fine Arts 



Ph.D. in 

Civil 

Engineering 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

students, many of whom will enter college teaching careers. It was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That Agenda Item II, Sec. II of 64-006 

dealing with graduate curriculum actions 
be recommended for approval by the Board 
of Trustees. 

The Committee took up Agenda Item III, 64-007, a proposal 
for the Master of Arts in Fine Arts. The Chairman inquired as to 
the brevity of the printed proposal and indicated a desire for 
additional data. The Provost stated that additional information 
will be made available prior to the Board meeting. 

In response to a question, the Provost explained that 
there would be one special committee for the Master's Degree in Fine 
Arts, but in addition, there would be the usual individual guidance 
committee for each candidate in the program. It was noted that 
although an advanced degree is no assurance of brilliance in fine 
arts, it was becoming more necessary for those artists who desired 
teaching positions. It was suggested that the Committee on Faculty 
and Program of Study should take up consideration of creativity and 
the role of the University in promoting and nuturing this ability. 
It was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED ; That Agenda Item III, 64-007, proposing 
a Master of Fine Arts degree program be 
recommended for approval by the Board 
of Trustees. 

The proposal for the Ph.D. in Civil Engineering, Agenda 
Item IV, 64-008, was then considered. The Provost noted that Civil 
Engineering is one of the outstanding departments in the Engineering 
School, with an exceptionally well-qualified head and a talented 
young staff. The Department has a commendable record of producing 
good master's candidates. The proposed program would not require 
many additional courses, and the new courses required would 
emphasize research techniques and methodology. In response to an 
inquiry, the Provost mentioned that the proposed program would in- 
volve a cooperative approach with Geology. 

The President stated that the program would not likely de- 
tract from the production of "working" engineers, but would broaden 
the traditional solid engineering program of the School. The Chair- 
man noted that "working" engineers would also be produced by the 
growing state technical institutes, but only the University can pro- 
vide a public source of engineering teachers, some of whom will be 
required to staff the technical institutes. The President felt the 
program would also accelerate the upgrading of the Civil Engineering 
staff and that with improved salaries this could more readily be 
accomplished. It was moved, seconded, and 



COMMITTEE 



2447 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED ; That Agenda Item IV, 64-008, regarding 
the proposal to establish the Ph.D. in 
Civil Engineering be recommended for 
approval by the Board of Trustees 

Agenda Item V, 64-009, proposal for Master of Arts in 
Statistics was then discussed. The Provost pointed out this step 
was long overdue, and the University was now staffed to a degree thajt 
made this feasible. The program was not proposed for location in 
the Mathematics Department because, if it were, the focus would be 
on derivation of formulae. The desired program is broader, in- 
cluding applied techniques as well as derivations. It was noted 
that the organizational problem of statistical training is always a 
difficult one, with no universally satisfactory solutions known. 
At this stage the inter-departmental committee approach appears most 
useful, particularly in view of the fact that emerging patterns in 
Applied Mathematics and in Computer Science work make it desirable 
not to freeze an organizational pattern prematurely. Individual 
professional statistical courses, as Economic statistics and 
Psychology statistics, would still be offered in the respective de- 
partments, but basic and general statistics at the advanced level 
would be in the jurisdiction of the proposed program. It was moved, 
seconded, and 

VOTED : That Agenda Item V, 64-009, proposing the 

Master of Arts in Statistics be recommended 
for approval by the Board of Trustees. 

The President informed the Committee of the pending 
resignation of the University Secretary, Dr. John W. Ryan. He asked 
the Committee for advice and suggestions as to the future role, 
functions, and responsibilities of the position of University 
Secretary. He noted that the present scope of the position could 
logically and effectively be separated into two full-time positions, 
that of Secretary to the Board and its committees, and that of 
Assistant to the President. The present role appeared to be an 
accretion of duties over the years, plus a reflection of an 
incumbent's particular talents and abilities. For the latter 
reasons, the duties of the position had extended considerably under 
Dr. Ryan, but it was not assured that this could be done 
effectively under his replacement. It was suggested that Dr. Ryan 
might, prior to leaving, be willing to give his evaluation and 
recommendations on this matter. 

The Chairman raised the issue of what could be the role 
and function of the Committee on Faculty and Program of Study it- 
self. One suggestion was that the Committee could, in addition to 
its regular duties, focus on the program, plans and accomplishments 
of the various schools and colleges in order, over time, to gain a 
greater insight in depth into the principles and philosophies 
governing these units of the University. The Chairman suggested 
that what may be needed is a long-term educational policy committee 
which this Committee might well become. Another idea was to 



Master of 
Arts in 
Statistics 



2448 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

operate as a joint Trustee-Faculty committee in the area of educa- 
tional policy and planning. A still further concept was the creation 
of sub-committees to explore intensively various areas of Committee 
responsibility and to report and recommend thereon. 

The President informed the Committee that with the National 
Mathematics meetings coming the end of August, it was necessary to 
tell the Mathematics Department whether it would be possible, in 
seeking a head of the department, to be able to offer $18,000 if 
necessary. A year's search at a lesser figure has proved no person 
is available. It was brought out that at a neighboring institution 
the matter of salary did not require Trustee action, although this 
was not a public institution. The Chairman noted that this focused, 
also, on the appropriate role of the Committee in regard to Univer- 
sity appointments. The Committee then discussed whether it has, or 
should have, Board authority to work with the President in fast- 
moving developments and, if necessary, to authorize him in the name 
of the Board, to act when the situation requires prompt action, 
subject to subsequent Board approval. 

The hope was expressed by some members of the Committee 
that the pending by-law revision would clarify Committee responsi- 
bilities and authority, and make for an administratively expeditious 
and workable procedure. 



There being no further business, the meeting adjourned at 



2:05 p.m. 




Leo F. iRedi^rn 
Secretary pro tem. 



I 



:OMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
September 4, 1963, 10:30 a.m., President's Office 



PRESENT : President Lederle, Chairman Haig is, 
Trustees Brown and Thompson, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Ryan. 
Present during part of the meeting 
were Messrs. Shakalis, Plant and 
White of Stone & Webster, and 
Mr. Hugill, Mr. Barber and Judge 
Blassberg 

The Chairman opened the meeting with Item II on the agenda 
concerning recommendation of the Board for selection of architects. 
Treasurer Johnson reviewed for the committee the status of projects 
at the University as set forth in Document 64-010. He informed the 
members of the committee that a model of the campus plan and exist- 
ing structures was being prepared in the office of Sasaki, Walker & 
Associates. After general discussion, the consensus among the 
committee was that on completion of the model of the campus 
structures in the Sasaki, Walker & Associates offices, the committee 
should meet in those offices and at that time review plans, sketches 
and models from the architects for the several projects listed in 
Document 64-010. 

The committee considered Project 8064-27, Central Storage 
Building, and the recommendation of an architect with their plans. 
Treasurer Johnson presented to the committee preliminary recommenda- 
tions from Dean Belluschi. In the course of general discussion, 
the committee considered the likelihood that the Central Storage 
facility would be constructed immediately adjacent to and probably 
connecting with the present Maintenance Building. The Maintenance 
Building was designed by Mr. Henry J. Tessier. After general 
discussion and upon motion being duly made and seconded, it 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the following architects be recommended to 
the Commission on Administration & Finance 
for preparing plans for the Central Storage 
Building, in the order listed: 

1. Henry J. Tessier - Springfield 

2. Goody & Clancy - Boston 

3. Pierce & Pierce - Boston 

The committee reviewed the entire list of projects and 
architects in Document 64-010, After general discussion and upon 
motion being duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 



2449 



Review of 
Architects 
and Status 
of Work 



Central 
Storage 
Building - 

Recommendat ion 
of Architect 



Reaffirmation 
of Archi- 
tectural 
Re commendat ions 



■1 



:450 



COMMITTEE 



Power Plant 
U63-7 - 
Study of 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Board reaffirm the recommendation of 
architects as set forth in Document 64-010, 
and that the President be authorized to in- 
form Commissioner Waldron by letter of this 
action. 

The committee considered the report prepared by the Stone 
& Webster Engineering Corporation of the Power Plant including 
electric power generation, type of fuel, and steam distribution at 
the University of Massachusetts. After general discussion and upon 
motion being duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the report prepared by Stone & Webster 
Engineering Corporation be accepted in 
principle. 

Representatives of the Stone & Webster Engineering Corporaj- 
tion, Mr. Plant, Mr. Shakalis and Mr. White, discussed the report, 
its findings and their recommendations, in response to the questions 
of the members of the committee. In the course of general 
discussion, the following points were made: 



1. Steam heat on campus is presently provided by 
use of a low pressure system. Future require- 
ments of the University indicate a change to 

a high pressure system, in part, is necessary. 

2. Continuous changes in technology as well as 
in the size of the University and consequent 
demand for electric power suggests that the 
status of equipment must be continuously re- 
viewed. Careful study by Stone & Webster 

of present facilities indicates that no 
gross errors have been made in the past but 
changes in equipment may be indicated as 
time goes on. It is possible, for example, 
to increase the use of equipment such as: 

a. Use of generators to produce 
more of the electric power 
needed on the campus. 

b. Use of steam in warm weather 
months for air conditioning 
equipment. 

3. At present, the fuel used to produce steam and 
electric power on campus is coal. This is 
satisfactory. Certain market economies might 
be obtained in the future if additional 
facilities could be added to the University 
Power Plant equipment and were fueled by oil. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After the discussion had been concluded and the repre- 
sentatives from Stone 6s Webster had departed from the meeting, the 
members of the committee discussed the report and several of the 
recommendations. After general discussion and upon motion being 
duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED; To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that Stone & Webster Engineering Corpora- 
tion be recommended for selection for 
future electric, steam and power plant 
i design work at the University of 
Massachusetts. 

Judge Blassberg presented several land acquisition matters 
to the committee for their discussion and consideration. First, 
Judge Blassberg reported to the committee that Julius Grandonico 
had offered to settle his claim for compensation for property taken 
by eminent domain by the University. Judge Blassberg reported to 
the committee on a third appraisal of the property. Judge Blassberg 
recommended acceptance of the settlement at a figure on file in the 
Treasurer's Office, After general discussion of the matter, the 
committee was unable to agree on a recommendation and it was there- 
fore moved and seconded and unanimously 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they purchase or take by eminent domain in 
fee, the property of Michael W. Dziuba and 
Mary A. Dziuba situate at Hillside Avenue 
in Amherst, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, 
and more particularly described as Parcel 6, 
Page 11-A of the Town Atlas, Town of Amherst, 
and that the purchase price for said property 
be Twelve Thousand Five Hundred ($12,500.00) 
dollars. 

Judge Blassberg reported that Charles Palmer has offered 
to settle purchase price for his property at $13,750. Since this 
amount is within the limits of the independent appraisals of the 
value of that property, Judge Blassberg recommended that the offer 
be accepted. After general discussion and upon motion being duly 
made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they purchase or take by eminent domain in 
fee, the property of Charles Palmer situate 
at Hillside Avenue in Amherst, Hampshire 
County, Massachusetts, and more particularly 
described as Parcel 8, Page 11-A of the Town 
Atlas, Town of Amherst, and that the purchase 
price for said property be Thirteen Thousand 
Seven Hundred Fifty ($13,750.00) dollars. 



2451 



Recommendat ions 
of Stone 6c 
Webster for 
future electri- 
cal, steam & 
power design 
work 



Dziuba 
Property - 
settlement 
offer 



Palmer 
Property 



2452 



COMMITTEE 



Terms and 
Conditions of 
Occupancy of 

Univers ity 

Housing 



Holdsworth 
Hall - 
acceptance of 



Dormitory 

Construction 

Progress 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



In the course of general discussion, members of the 
committee expressed concern at the possibility that some, properties 
taken by eminent domain might continue to be occupied and/or used 
by former owners for some period of time without payment of rent 
or without any other specific agreement with the University by 
which the Commonwealth could be compensated. After general 
discussion, consensus among the. members was that a policy statement 
should be prepared by Treasurer Johnson with the advice of Judge 
Blassberg regarding the conditions under which property taken by 
eminent domain must be vacated or might continue to be occupied and 
used. The policy statement will be referred to the consideration 
of the committee at a later meeting. 

The committee considered the terms and conditions of 
occupancy of faculty and staff housing (63-087) and married student 
housing (63-088). After general discussion and upon motion being 
duly made and seconded, it x;as unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the terms and conditions 
of occupancy of faculty and staff housing 
as set forth in Document 63-087 and terms 
and conditions of occupancy of married 
student housing as set forth in Document 
63-088. 

Members of the committee adjourned to Holdsworth Hall and 
inspected the premises. After a thorough tour of the building, 
during which the members of the committee received the assistance 
of Mr. Hugill and Mr. Arnold Rhodes and other staff members of the 
University, it was moved, seconded and unanimously , 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

the acceptance of the Natural Resources 
Building (Holdsworth Hall), Project 
U-59-2, as completed. 

Members of the committee generally discussed the progress 
being made on dormitory construction. The present stage of con- 
struction and state of construction activity caused members of the 
committee to express doubt as to whether the dormitory project be- 
hind the President's House would be completed for use in the fall 
of 1964. Consensus of feeling among the members of the committee 
was that everything within the power of the committee should be done 
to facilitate the work on the project in order to complete the 
facility for use in fall of 1964. 



5:00 p.m. 



There being no further business, the meeting adjourned at 




John 
Secretary 



tnTwT 
, Bos 



\ 



Ryan 
oard of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
October 15, 1963, 4:00 p.m., Parker House, Boston 



PRESENT : President Lederle, Trustees Healey, 
Fox, Pumphret, Treasurer Johnson, 
Acting Secretary Redfern 

The committee discussion of the tax sheltered annuity 
program, authorized by recent state legislation, focused mainly on 
two points: (l) Should such a program be made available to staff 
members of the University; and (2) What should be the conditions 
of participation including the advisability of a blanket contract 
on a bid basis versus individual selection of insurance contracts? 
It was pointed out that according to insurance experts, changes in 
existing contracts would likely be limited to one annual date. 
After general discussion and upon motion being duly made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

approve the principle of University staff 
participation in authorized tax sheltered 
annuity programs and that the Board re- 
quest the administration to refer details 
on procedure to the Finance Committee for 
final approval. 

In response to requests by University staff members, 
particularly those carrying students on authorized field trips and 
other official business, the committee discussed a letter received 
from Mr. Collins Graham of Boit, Dalton and Church of Boston 
setting forth bids and conditions they had received in response to 
an inquiry regarding motor vehicle insurance coverage for Uni- 
versity automotive equipment. Mr. Pumphret stated that he will 
check on the policy of the State Rating Bureau in regard to the 
possibility of extending credit for bodily injuries coverage. A 
question was raised as to the self-insuring policy of -the Common- 
wealth. It was brought out that a deductible policy would save 
money for the University, but might cause problems of respective 
jurisdiction between "primary" and "excess" insurers. After genera 
discussion, it was agreed that further study would be desirable, 
particularly in regard to the possibility of deductible types of 
coverages on the theory that the State has, in effect, primary 
coverage on the basis of $10,000 - $20,000 authorized State 
obligation through the Attorney-General's Office. 

The Treasurer distributed to committee members a report 
on "Classifications, Sources and Uses of Funds for the Fiscal Year 
1962-63". The Treasurer pointed out that this report presents in- 
formation upon the various trust funds and research grants re- 
ceived and disbursed by the University. It was noted that all 
these accounts, as well as the general State appropriations for the 



2453 



Tax 

Sheltered 

Annuity 

Program 



Automobile 

Liability 

Insurance 

Coverage for 

University 

Employees 



Trust Fund 
Operation 



2454 



COMMITTEE 



Unrestricted 
Trust Fund 



Research and 
other Grant 
Overhead 



Authorization 
to Associate 
Treasurer for 
Official 
Endorsements 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



University, are annually audited by the State Auditors and funds 
received from the Federal Government are, in addition, audited "by 
Federal representatives. There was committee discussion to the 
effect that there be maintained a balanced portfolio of savings 
accounts, including the drawing down on variable interest accounts 
as may be required to achieve the purpose of the balanced portfolio, 
The committee agreed to look further into the details of the re- 
quirements for maintaining a balanced savings account portfolio. 
After general discussion and upon motion being duly made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : That the treasury bills coming due in 
October 1963 be put into variable in- 
terest accounts for the time being. 

Upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that $1,000 be allotted from the Un- 
restricted Endowment Income to the 
President for special needs. 

The committee further suggested that a summary of the re- 
port of the Treasurer on "Classification, Sources and Uses of Funds 
for Fiscal Year 1962-63" (Document number 64-017) be prepared and 
distributed by the Chairman of the Finance Committee to the Board 
of Trustees. 

The President and Treasurer described the operation and 
utilization of research grant overhead funds. It was pointed out 
that in connection with prior vote of the Board of Trustees such 
funds were allocated to support of broad programs of research at 
the University and to related works. The Treasurer distributed a 
proposed budget for research trust funds for fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1964. After general discussion and upon motion being duly 
made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of the proposed budget for re- 
search trust fund for fiscal year 1964. 

Upon recommendation of the President, it was duly moved, 
seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
authorize Robert H. Brand, Associate 
Treasurer of the University of Massachusetts, 
as directed by the Treasurer, or in his 
absence, to sign or endorse in the name of 
the University of Massachusetts or the 
Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts such official documents and 



COMMITTEE 



2455 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



vouchers, including checks, drafts, certifi- 
cates of deposit and withdrawal orders, as 
require the signature of the financial 
officer of the University provided that all 
checks, drafts, certificates of deposit and 
withdrawal orders in an amount of $10,000 
or more shall require the additional 
signature of either the Treasurer or the 
Controller except fund transfers between 
accounts in the First National Bank of 
Amherst. 

The Treasurer called to the attention of the committee 
the fact that as a result of a recent stock split by Commonwealth 
Edison Company, the University had an opportunity, in connection 
with its holdings of stock in said company, to purchase fractional 
shares 'under the new terms. Upon motion being duly made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to purchase the 
fractional shares of Commonwealth Edison 
as made available to the University as a 
result of its holding shares in said 
company in its investment portfolios. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 6:15 p.m. 



Purchase of 
Fractional 
Shares of 
Holdings 




Leo F. 
Acting Secretary, Board of Trustees 



2456 



COMMITTEE 



Master 
Plan 



Campus 
Pond 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

November 14, 1963, 10:30 a.m., Office of Sasaki 
Walker & Associates, Watertown 



Chairman Haigis presiding 



PRESENT : Trustee Haigis, President Lederle, 
Trustees Schuck, Brett, Thompson, 
Brown, Treasurer Johnson, Acting 
Secretary Redfern, Dean Belluschi 
and from the Sasaki Walker firm: 
Richard Galehouse, Stewart Dawson, 
Wayne Womack and Paul Gardescu 

The Chairman opened the meeting "before a large three- 
dimensional model of the campus which reflected the current develop- 
ment of campus master planning. He introduced Mr. Galehouse, 
project director, who explained the underlying purpose of the model 
and also described the wall photographs and traffic circulation 
maps displayed for the committee. He pointed out that although the 
basic scheme has remained constant for having pedestrian traffic at 
the center of the campus and vehicle traffic running in relatively 
high speed circumferential roads, periodic modifications have been 
made to meet changes in master plan site locations and for the pur- 
pose of improved traffic flow and vehicle control. Mr. Dawson then 
explained the proposed road system and service access points laid 
out in the model. He pointed out that the proposed main approach 
to the campus (southwest end) provides a symbolic entrance to the 
University campus. The proposed mall does not encourage any one 
building as a symbol of the University, but provides a sense of 
spacial relationships as an identification of the University. The 
focal point of the campus spacial relationship should be the campus 
pond which ideally should be enlarged. The center of the campus is 
knit together with a system of pedestrian walks. The design of the 
campus would still allow for extended vehicle penetration into the 
campus for emergency use or for service vehicles or for students 
bringing or taking away personal possessions in the dormitories. 
This penetration is accomplished by a system of loops into the 
center of the campus from the circumferential roads and, if de- 
sired, by use of certain central pedestrian malls during specific 
periods of time or for emergencies. 

In response to a question, Dean Belluschi recommended 
handling the campus pond in such a fashion as to capitalize upon 
it as an aesthetic asset of irreplaceable value. He acknowledged 
that there may be some problems in connection with maintaining the 
pond but felt that these were very minor compared to the visual and 
emotional value of such a central landscape feature. It was moved, 
seconded and unanimously 






rOMMJTTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



, VOTED : To approve in principle the campus plan 
as expressed in the model and related 
maps, with appreciation for the work 
which has been put into the planning 
and design by the Master Planning Council 
and by Sasaki Walker and Associates. 

Dean Belluschi pointed out that the present design, which 
was shown in model form, is the result of several trial and error 
approaches to find the appropriate aesthetic and functional design 
required for the new Administration Building, The new design is, 
in his opinion, an imaginative and relevant solution. It has 
-several unique features, including the use of inner courts and ex- 
ternally an earthen ramp approach. In addition, it is well sited, 
and for economy uses cast and cast-in-place construction. 

Architectural preliminary design plans for the Machmer 
Hall addition were shown to the committee. It was pointed out that 
the tower structure would be so designed as to allow for subsequent 
addition of floors as desired in an economical fashion. The large 
lecture hall wing is one of the major needs of those departments 
presently utilizing the facilities of Machmer Hall, The pre- 
liminary plans were turned over to Dean Belluschi for study and 
analysis . 

Preliminary plans were displayed for phase 1 of the 
Southwest Dormitory Project which includes several high-rise dorms, 
low-rise dorms, and dining facility. These plans were also turned 
over to Dean Belluschi for study and analysis. 

The Treasurer reported that Mr, Yamasaki had declined the 
architect's contract for designing the Fine Arts Center. The 
Treasurer stated that when he was notified of the declination he 
had immediately contacted Yamasaki Associates on November 1st re- 
questing them to reconsider the matter, He reported that they in- 
formed him subsequently, that they had reconsidered the question 
at an evening staff conference at which Mr. Yamasaki was present 
and that their decision to decline remained unchanged. The matter 
of Yamasaki 's interest in the project was reviewed, including 
discussion of his visit last June when he apparently showed in- 
terest in the project, particularly in view of the agreement to 
add the auditorium and related facilities to the project. 

The disagreement between the Commonwealth and Yamasaki 
over the form of the agreement, including the procedure used by 
Yamasaki of a model and review process of design was discussed. 
Mr. Chase of the Bureau of Building Construction had orally agreed 
to go along on this approach within the limitations of statutory 
authority. It was also noted that Yamasaki ?ranted a 9j>% fee, which 
is a national standard rate for facilities of artistic design. 
The state had informally agreed to this. Then it was agreed that 
October 1st was to be the date for signing of the contract. The 
Commonwealth did not take action on October 1st because, although 
Mr. Chase had worked since August, when the informal agreement had 



2457 



Administration 
Building 



Machmer Hall 
Addition 

preliminary 
plans 



Southwest 
Quadrangle 



Fine Arts 
Center 



2458 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

been worked up with Yamasaki, to get the Commissioner of Ad- 
ministration to approve the contract, he was unable to do so within 
the deadline period. On October 1st Yamasaki' s office called to 
say that other commitments were being pressed upon them. On 
September 24th and October 4th letters were sent to the 
Commissioner on Administration urging his prompt approval of the 
arrangements (see Document 64-032 ). 

However, Commissioner Waldron apparently did not approve 
until October 16th, which was too late to meet the deadline set by 
Yamasaki 's office. The letter sent by Mr. Chase offering contract 
approval did not reach Yamasaki in time before his other commit- 
ments came into force, compelling him to decline the contract with 
the Commonwealth. 

It was pointed out that the news of Yamasaki' s refusal to 
sign the contract came as a shock to some of the Trustees. The 
question was raised as to whether or not there might be a chance 
to salvage the situation, because it was a great achievement for 
the University to have had the opportunity to get Yamasaki to design 
the Fine Arts Center, and the opportunity should not be passed by 
if there is any possibility existing that it would still be possible 
to make such an arrangement. 

In view of the apparent finality of Yamasaki 's refusal, 
some Trustees felt that other outstanding architects should be con- 
tacted and persuaded to take on this project. It was pointed out 
that Dean Belluschi in his letter to the Treasurer of November 5, 
1963, had suggested that the firm of Eero Saarinen & Associates 
would admirably fill the requirement of excellence expected in the 
design of the Fine Arts Center. The Treasurer submitted to the 
committee the two names suggested by the Head of the Art Depart- 
ment. After general discussion as to appropriate procedures for 
the committee to follow in this situation, it was moved, seconded 
and 

VOTED : That the name of Eero Saarinen & Associates 
be submitted, as first choice for architects 
for the Fine Arts Center project, subject 
to the provision that said firm be contacted 
to determine their interest in and commitment 
to the challenge, and their availability for 
designing this project; and further provided 
that Saarinen & Associates will replace the 
name of Yamasaki on the list submitted to the 
Commission on Administration & Finance, said 
list containing the name of I. M. Pei & 
Associates as number 2 recommendation and 
the name of Harry Weese as number 3 
recommendation. 



i 



i 



i 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Treasurer reported that the Western Massachusetts 
Electric Company has proposed they be given an opportunity to pro- 
vide electric heating for new buildings on the campus. The 
Company believes that the cost will be competitive with other 
means of heating and that further it will avoid future need of 
approximately $5,000,000 for a steam plant expansion. The Company 
is especially interested in providing electric heating for the 
southwest dormitory project and have offered to pay for redesign- 
ing of said dormitories to incorporate electric heating. The 
committee felt that before decision could be made on this matter, 
further study would be required and that the Western Massachusetts 
Electric Company, if interested in pursuing the matter of future 
electric heating, be asked to submit a study which included a 
proof of comparative cost estimates and a statement as to what, if 
any, long-term guarantees could be provided on rate payments. If 
such a study were submitted, the committee believed that it should 
be referred to Stone & Webster for review and analysis. It was 
agreed that this matter should not be allowed to cause any delay 
in the progress of the southwest dormitory project. 

The Treasurer submitted a "Report on Land Acquisition, 
November 1, 1963" (Document 64-033). This document set forth the 
legal authorizations and subsequent actions taken for acquisition 
of land from 1957 to November, 1963. It set forth the statutory 
appropriations, the property acquired, and the list of appraisers 
and the legal counsel used including fees paid for services rendered 
in connection with land acquisition. 

The question was raised as to whether or not University 
property acquisitions are registered in the land court. The 
Treasurer pointed out that acquisitions have been filed in the 
County Registry of Deeds and that no registration in land court 
has occurred because the appropriate outside dimensions of the 
property to be registered in land court have remained in a state 
of flux. He promised to look into this and see if it would be 
possible to determine when an overall registration in the land 
court ought to be done on property acquired by the University. 
After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To accept the "Report on Land Acquisition 
dated November 1, 1963" and to refer it 
to the Board. 

The Chairman thanked the Treasurer's Office for the de- 
tailed work of preparing this explanatory report. The committee 
expressed a desire to have entered on the agenda of the Board of 
Trustees a statement with supporting documentation, to accompany 
the Report on Land Acquisition, in regard to delays which have 
been caused by the state government in regard to the process of 
land acquisition, architects* appointments, and contract awards 
for University campus development. It was moved, seconded and 



2459 



Western 
Massachusetts 
Electric 
Company 

heating for 
New Buildings 



Land 
Acquisition 

Report on 



2460 



COMMITTEE 



Kentfield 
Property 

Correction as 
per meeting of 
Nov. 22, 1963: 

The Treasurer re- 
ported that the 
owners have re- 
quested a Pro 
Tanto payment as 
provided "by law. 



Palmer 
Property 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : That the "Report on Land Acquisition" 
to be referred to the Board, be 
accompanied by a statement with 
supporting document in regard to de- 
lays caused by the state government 
on land acquisitions and architects' 
appointments connected with University 
projects . 

The Frederick J. Kentfield, et.al. property on Amity 
Street, Hadley, consists of approximately 40 acres and has been 
appraised by two appraisers each rendering a $20,000 appraisal. 



3BfcdB»fo^*te£mdEi^ 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : That if a request for a Pro Tanto payment 
be made and if approved by the Board of 
Trustees, sixty (60) percent of the 
average of all appraised values made be 
paid on property being purchased or 
taken by the University. 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board that the re- 
quest from Emerson S. Searle represent- 
ing Frederick J. Kentfield, Helen M. 
Kentfield and James F. Kentfield for a 
Pro Tanto payment on their land situate 
in Hadley, Massachusetts taken by 
eminent domain by the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts by order 
dated April 16, 1963 be approved and , 
that a payment be made of Twelve Thousand 
($12,000.00) Dollars which is sixty (60) 
percent of the average of the appraised 
valuations . 

After general discussion, including review of the policy 
of not authorizing higher than 10$ above the average of the two 
highest appraisals made on any piece of property, it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : In accordance with Chapter 705, Acts of 
1962, Item 8063-19, authorizing the 
Trustees of the University to acquire 
certain lands with the buildings thereon, 
for the development of the University, by 
purchase or by eminent domain under 
Chapter 79 of the General Laws, and the 
authority granted therein, independent 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



appraisals of the value of the land 
and buildings having been made by 
qualified disinterested appraisers, 
and filed with Kenneth W. Johnson, 
Treasurer, on motion duly made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board that the 
Treasurer is authorized to offer 
Charles Palmer the sum of $13,200 
for the purchase of the property of 
said Palmer situate at Hillside 
Avenue in Amherst, Hampshire County, 
Massachusetts, and more particularly 
described as Parcel 8, Page 11-A of 
the Town Atlas, Town of Amherst, or 
if this is not agreeable to the owner, 
to proceed with eminent domain pro- 
ceedings for title in fee to secure 
said property for necessary purposes 
of the University and of the Common- 
wealth. 

After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : In accordance with Chapter 705, Acts 

of 1962, Item 8063-19, authorizing the 
Trustees of the University to acquire 
certain lands with the buildings there- 
on, for the development of the Uni- 
versity, by purchase or by eminent 
domain under Chapter 79 of the General 
Laws, and the authority granted therein, 
independent appraisals of the value of 
the land and buildings having been made 
by qualified disinterested appraisers, 
and filed with Kenneth W. Johnson, 
Treasurer, on motion duly made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees of the 
University purchase or take by eminent 
domain in fee, the property of Arthur 
F. Taylor and Freda H. Taylor situate 
at North Pleasant Street in Amherst, 
Hampshire County, Massachusetts and more 
particularly described as Parcel 4, Page 
8-A of the Town Atlas, Town of Amherst, 
and that the purchase price for said 
property be Twenty Thousand ($20,000,00) 
Dollars and that the conveyance be sub- 
ject to the conditions and agreements as 
set out in the option for the purchase of 
the said property signed by the said 
Arthur F. and Freda H. Taylor. 



2461 



Taylor 
Property 



2462 



COMMITTEE 



Malinowski 
Property 



Tudryn 
Property 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : In accordance with Chapter 705, Acts of 
1962, Item 8063-19, authorizing the 
Trustees of the University to acquire 
certain lands with the buildings thereon, 
for the development of the University, by 
purchase or by eminent domain under 
Chapter 79 of the General Laws, and the 
authority granted therein, independent 
appraisals of the value of the land and 
buildings having been made by qualified 
disinterested appraisers, and filed with 
Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer, on motion 
duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees of the Uni- 
versity purchase or take by eminent domain 
in fee, the property of Helen E. Malinowski 
situate at Sunset Avenue in Amherst, 
Hampshire County, Massachusetts and more 
particularly described as Parcel 9, Page 
11-A of the Town Atlas, Town of Amherst, 
and that the purchase price for said 
property be Sixteen Thousand Seven Hundred 
Twenty ($16,720.00) Dollars and that the 
conveyance be subject to the condition 
that the owner have the option (non- 
assignable) to occupy said premises until 
April 1, 1965. 

After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : In accordance with Chapter 648, Acts of 
196,3, Item 8064-30, authorizing the 
Trustees of the University to acquire 
certain lands with the buildings thereon, 
for the development of the University, by 
purchase or by eminent domain under 
Chapter 79 of the General Laws, and the 
authority granted therein, independent 
appraisals of the value of the land and 
buildings having been made by qualified 
disinterested appraisers, and filed with 
Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer, on motion 
duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 



k 



I 



t 



I 



COMMITTEE 



1 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees of the 
University purchase or take by eminent 
domain in fee, the property of Joseph 
L. and Anneliese Tudryn situate on the 
northerly side of Amity Street in 
Amherst, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, 
containing 9.63577 acres more or less 
and being a portion of the premises 
described in deed recorded in Book 1161, 
Page 4-22, Hampshire Registry of Deeds and 
more particularly described on a "Plan of 
Land in Amherst, Massachusetts to be 
acquired by the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts for the use of the Trustees of 
the University of Massachusetts", dated 
November 6, 196 3, Gordon E. Ains worth & 
Associates, Registered Land Surveyors; 
and that the price for said property be 
Twelve Thousand ($12,000.00) Dollars; 
and that the conveyance be subject to the 
conditions and agreements as set out in 
the option for the purchase of the said 
property signed by said Joseph L. and 
Anneliese Tudryn. 

The committee took up agenda item number 6 in regard to 
policies on naming of University Schools, Colleges and buildings. 
In line with the standixg policy of the Board, it was reaffirmed 
that no personal names are to be assigned to Schools or Colleges 
of the University of Massachusetts. 

After general discussion, including acknowledgment of 
the great contributions which had been made to the development of 
the University by the late Senator Ralph C, Mahar, it was moved, 
seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the large Auditorium of the School 
of Business Administration be named the 
Ralph C. Mahar Auditorium. 

After general discussion, including a review of the Uni- 
versity functions in the area of natural resources, it was moved, 
seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the new Natural Resources Building 
be named the Holdsworth Natural Resources 
Center. 

Policy in Regard to Naming Buildings After Living Persons 

After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 



2463 



Naming of 
New Buildings 



Business 

Administration 

Building 



Ralph C. 

Mahar 

Auditorium 



Holdsworth 
Natural 
Resources 
Center 



2464 



Naming of 
Buildings 



COMMITTEE 



Cold 

Storage 

Building 

Additions 
to Existing 
Buildings 



Amendments 
to Traffic 
Rules and 
Regulations 



Letter of 
Appreciation 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : That it is hereby declared to be the 
policy of the Board of Trustees not 
to name University buildings after 
living persons who are or formerly 
have been members of the University 
faculty, staff, or administration. 

After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Eoard of Trustees 
that the new Cold Storage Building be 
named the Cold Storage Building. 

The committee agreed that new additions to existing build- 
ings now coming on the line shall be known by the same name as the 
building to which they are attached; these additions include the 
addition to the Physics Building, the fourth section of the Morrill 
Science Center, and the Food Technology addition to Chenoweth 
Laboratory. 

The Treasurer distributed copies of a proposed amendment 
to the University Traffic Rules and Regulations (Document 63-081) . 
The Treasurer pointed out that the new section on Registration Fees 
would be required according to information received from the Campus 
Security Force. In addition, a revision of Article VTII - 
Penalities - is being proposed in response to the request of the 
Clerk of the District Court for Hampshire County. After general 
discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the Traffic Rules and Regulations, 
approved by the Trustees to become 
effective on April 15, 1963, be amended 
according to Document 64-034. 

Trustees Haigis and Thompson wished to be recorded as 
abstaining from the vote until they had had opportunity for further 
study of the proposed amendments. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To direct the Acting Secretary to send 
a letter to Sasaki Walker & Associates 
expressing the thanks and appreciation 
of the committee for the hospitality 
and courtesies which had been extended 
to them. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned at 



3:43 p.m. 



Leo F. Redfern 
Acting Secretary, Board of Trustees 






i 



I 



COMMITTEE 



J 



2465 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

November 15, 1963, 11:00 a.m., President's Office 



PRESENT : Trustee Schuck, President Lederle, 
Trustees Crowley, Haigis and 
Plimpton, Provost Woodside, Acting 
Secretary Redfern and for portions 
of the meeting Treasurer Johnson 
and Dean of Arts and Sciences 
Hunsberger 

A quorum being present, the Chairman called the meeting 
to order at 11:00 a.m.. 

The President explained how it would be better to utilize 
the time of the person who, in the past, has been serving part-time 
as Secretary of the Board and part-time as an Assistant to the 
President. The recent past secretaries have been highly capable 
and able men, but with strong academic backgrounds they have not 
been entirely satisfied with the fragmented role which they have 
had to play in the position of Secretary. At the same time he noted 
that the area of University communications now requires strong 
leadership for program development and management purposes. This 
area is becoming increasingly important as the University continues 
to grow rapidly and to become a greater factor in the public higher 
educational system. Therefore, the President suggested that a 
rational and effective combination of needs would be to have a Uni- 
versity Secretary who also could serve as a qualified Director of 
Communications or University Relations. Such a position would re- 
quire a person qualified in communications media, knowledgeable of 
academic work and programs, and one who possesses administrative and 
public relations abilities of a higher order. Such a person could 
serve a critically needed function by thinking in terms of de- 
veloping a professional level program of communications, and 
organizing and coordinating presently scattered University efforts 
in this field. The President noted that if, in the future, the 
responsibilities in the communications area grew, as they well may, 
then appropriate action could then be taken to consider a separation 
of positions for the dual functions of Secretary and Director of 
Communications or of University Relations that are involved. It was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the committee approve in principle the 
concept of combining the position of Uni- 
versity Secretary and Director of Communica- 
tions or University Relations as suggested 
by the President and that the Committee 
Chairman inform the Board of Trustees of the 
procedure contemplated and of the level of 
salary needed to recruit an outstanding 
person. 



Secretary 
of the 
University 

Role and 
Resnonsibilitie 



Undergraduate 

Curriculum 

Changes 



COMMITTEE 



Waiver of 
Tuition in 
Speech 
Pathology & 
Audio logy- 



Endowed 
Chair in 
Food Science 
& Technology 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



After general discussion of the undergraduate curriculum 
changes recommended in Document 64-028, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the committee recommend to the Board 
of Trustees approval of the undergraduate 
curriculum changes as propas ed in Document 
64-028. 

The proposal for a waiver of tuition in Speech Pathology 
and Audiology for Advanced Students (Document 64-023) was discussed 
The Provost pointed out that similar waivers are presently offered 
in such areas as Speech Therapy and Nursing. The present estimate 
of the number that may be involved in the recommended proposal is 
four. The Provost noted that one limitation against any extensive 
acceptance of this opportunity arises from the fact that most of 
those who would be involved are located in hospitals some distance 
from the campus. After general discussion, it was moved, seconded 
and 

VOTED : That the committee recommend to the Board 
of Trustees approval of the request for 
Waiver of Tuition in Speech Pathology and 
Audiology for Advanced Students as con- 
tained in Document 64-023. 

The President called the attention of the committee to the 
proposal being made for sponsorship of a Chair in Food Science and 
Technology (Document 64-025). He noted that the University has had 
many years of cordial and cooperative relations with the sponsors of 
the proposed Chair, the Glass Container Manufacturers Institute. He 
mentioned that the University of Maine, for example, has entered in- 
to similar term-sponsored chairs as a means of encouraging outside 
support for distinguished teachers and researchers. The President 
felt that this type of approach holds considerable promise of in- 
creasing opportunities to solicit donations and gifts in support of 
the University's educational and research programs. He noted that 
in the specific proposal, the potential sponsors have indicated a 
firm intent to continue long-range support, but as a trade associa- 
tion they cannot make a legal commitment beyond five years. This 
approach will enrich the University both in terms of prestige and 
salary funds to aid the research and teaching efforts of our 
faculty. Under this or any similar program the Trustees would, of 
course, make all appointments and personnel actions affecting 
endowed chairs, although the President would, as a matter of 
courtesy, keep the donors informed as to actions being taken by the 
Trustees in regard to the chairs supported by the donors. After 
general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the committee refer the proposal for 
an Endowed Chair in Food Science and 
Technology as contained in Document 64-025 
to the Board of Trustees with the recommenda- 
tion for approval. 



. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The President stated that the administration has, along 
with the Committee on Faculty and Program of Study, consulted 
legal counsel as to proper interpretation of the salary increase 
act (Chapter 775, Acts of 1963), and on the basis of this advice 
and on the recommendation of the Deans, the proposed policies were 
being recommended to the committee. 

The Treasurer explained that Chapter 775 is an extremely 
complicated statute, but according to legal advice and information 
received from responsible state government officials, including 
the drafter of the statute, the intent as to professional staff is 
more clear than may be evident from the exact wording of the Act. 

Prior to autonomy, the University operated under the 
General Salary Schedule and for certain teaching personnel under 
the so-called "E" schedule (which contained rates $351 per year 
lower than those for the comparable job group and step positions in 
the General Salary Schedule). The basic principle to bear in mind 
is that in the state government everyone must be allocated to a 
salary schedule. Under autonomy the Trustees have the right to 
allocate professional personnel to a salary schedule. Last 
November the Trustees, acting under autonomy powers and within 
available funds, moved some personnel from the "E" schedule to the 
General Salary Schedule as required by the Autonomy Act (Section 
14, Chapter 64S, Acts of 1962). At the same time Trustee personnel 
action taken under autonomy made all professional staff members, 
who were affected by actions taken last fall or subsequently, 
"autonomous" whether or not they had been previously on the General 
Salary Schedule or on the "E" schedule. Currently, therefore, 
approximately 51$ of University professional staff are autonomous. 
About 60$ of University professional staff are on the General 
Salary Schedule (either through autonomy actions taken by the 
Trustees or through having been on the General Salary Schedule pre- 
viously and having had no subsequent Trustee autonomy action taken 
in connection with their position) . 

The salary increase act (Chapter 775) gives across-the- 
board 10$ salary increases and in addition, provides 10$ of a 
total professional staff payroll for distribution as merit in- 
creases under Trustee determination. In order for the Trustees to 
uphold to the fullest extent possible their autonomy powers, the 
administration is recommending that the Trustees take action grant- 
ing the basic 10$ as well as any future actions which may be re- 
quired in regard to merit increases for the additional 10$ avail- 
able. The administration has prepared a vote which accomplishes 
this step in regard to autonomous professional staff members re- 
ceiving a basic 10$ salary increase retroactive to July 1, 1963 
(but for persons on academic year appointments said increase to be 
retroactive to September 1, 1963, the date of the period of 
contractural services) . 



2467 



= 



Proposed 

Policies 

Regarding 

Salary 

Increases 



2468 



COMMITTEE 



Emergency 

Salary 

Adjustments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



As to those members of the professional staff not 
"autonomous", Chapter 775 may automatically reallocate these 
people. However, in order to uphold to the fullest extent their 
autonomy powers, it would be desirable as a matter of record for 
the Trustees also to vote such reallocations. Those professional 
staff members who are "non- autonomous" on the General Salary 
Schedule will thus move to a new General Salary Schedule 
established by Chapter 775; those "non-autonomous" professional 
staff members remaining on an "E" Schedule will move to a new "E" 
Schedule provided by Chapter 775. At a subsequent time it will be 
desirable for the Trustees to take action placing all professional 
staff members of the University on the same General Salary Schedule. 
The administration intends, in the not too distant future, to pre- 
pare recommendations that will, at the appropriate time, bring all 
staff members onto the new General Salary Schedule. After further 
discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That, in order to adopt, approve, confirm 
and ratify the changes in salaries and 
salary ranges effected by Chapter 775 of 
the Acts of 1963 as to those members of 
the professional staff of the University 
whose salaries have heretofore been changed 
or fixed by the Board of Trustees acting 
under and pursuant to Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 75, as amended, particularly 
Section 14 thereof, the salary and salary 
range of each such member of said pro- 
fessional staff be and it hereby is declared 
to be the amount and the range of amounts 
contained in the General Salary Schedule, 
as inserted by Section 1 of said Chapter 775 
in paragraph (l) of Section 46 of Chapter 30 
of said General Laws, which replace the 
respective amount and range of amounts, con- 
tained in the General Salary Schedule struck 
out by said Section 1, which constituted the 
salary and salary range of such member as 
heretofore so changed or fixed by the Board 
of Trustees, said change of salary and 
salary range being effective as of July 1, 
1963. (Taken under Section 9 of Chapter 
775, Acts of 1963) 

The President called attention to item 4 of his con- 
fidential memorandum which had been distributed to committee 
members. He recommended that the committee ratify prior commit- 
ments which had been made with the knowledge of the Board. The pro- 
posed action would grant the basic 10$ salary increase given to all 
professional staff members on their former salaries and then would 
ratify the various amounts of commitments which had been made to 
retain these key members of the faculty. The Chairman requested 
that the annual salaries be added as a new column to the classifica- 
tion listing of the commitments being recommended. After general 



COMMITTEE 



I 



2469 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

discussion, and upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That, pursuant to undertakings heretofore 
given to certain members of the pro- 
fessional staff of the University on the 
basis of which said members have been 
performing services for the University 
since September^, 1963, said undertakings 
having been given with the knowledge of 
the Board of Trustees but with respect to 
which recorded action by the Board of 
Trustees has been deferred pending enact- 
ment of Chapter 775 of the Acts of 1963, 
the classification, title, salary and 
salary range of the following named members 
of the professional staff of the University 
are hereby approved, authorized, confirmed 
and ratified, effective September 2, 1963, 
under and pursuant to Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 75, as amended, particularly 
Section 14 thereof, namely: 

Classification 









Weekly 










Salary 


Annual 




Salary Range 


Effect. 


Salary 


Name 


Title Minimum 


Maximum 


9=2^1 


2-?-62 


Azpeitia,A.F. 


Prof.U.M. $179.30 


$364.25 


$238.45 


$12,399.40 


Beth, L. P. 


Hd.Dept.(Ac-U)? 199.10 


364.25 


260.45 


13,543.40 


Driver, E.D. 


Assoc .Prof , U.M. 151. 55 


280.25 


238.45 


12,399.40 


Duckert,A.R. 


Asst. Prof.U.M. 132.00 


239.95 


173.10 


9,001.20 


Elkins,A, 


Asst. Prof.U.M. 132.00 


239.95 


169.15 


8,795.80 


Epstein, S. 


Prof.U.M. 179.30 


364.25 


250.55 


13,028.60 


Gagnon,P,W. 


Asst. Prof.U.M. 132.00 


239.95 


187.30 


9,739.60 


Gentile, A. 


Assoc. Prof.U.M. 151. 55 


280.25 


219.30 


11,403.60 


Gordon,M.M. 


Prof.U.M. 179.30 


364.25 


257.15 


13,371.80 


Greenfield, S, 


Assoc. Prof .U.M. 151. 55 


280.25 


202.70 


10,540.40 


Heller, P. 


Com. Prof .U.M. 179.30 


364.25 


283.55 


14,744.60 


Marcus , J . 


Prof.U.M. 179.30 


364,25 


229.10 


11,913.20 


Niedzielski,H. 


Inst.U.M. 114.70 


202.70 


143.60 


7,467.20 


Park, P. 


Asst. Prof.U.M. 132.00 


239.95 


173.10 


9,001.20 


Pippert,R.R. 


Assoc .Prof .U.M. 151. 55 


280.25 


214.30 


11,143.60 


Sussman, Leila Assoc. Prof .U.M, 151, 55 


280.25 


210.40 


10,940.80 


Teichner,W, 


Prof.(^ time)# 179.30 


364.25 


131.17 


6,820.84 


Whitney, L.F, 


Assoc . Prof . " A"#179 . 30 


306.65 


214.30* 


11, 143. 60 


Wilkinson, T.O. 


Assoc ^Prof.U.M. 151. 55 


280.25 


235.50 


12,246.00 



* Effective 9-29-63 



# U.M. 



2 



COMMITTEE 

Salary 
Increases 
for Non- 
Autonomous 
Personnel on 
General 
Salary- 
Schedule 



Salary- 
Increases for 
Demonstration 
Teachers 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



In order to affirm the authority and powers of the Board 
of Trustees of the University und r .^ "hauter 648, Acts of 1962, it 
was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That pursuant to Section 5 of Chapter 775 
of the Acts of 1963, those members of the 
professional staff of the University, 

hose salaries arc allocated to the Genera"! 
Salary Schedule not having heretofore been 
changed or fixed by the Board of Trustees 
acting under and pursuant to Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 75, as amended, are 
hereby reallocated to the sanr job ^roup 
and step in the new General Salary Schedu" 
established by Section 1 of Chapter 775 , 
Acts of 1963, said change of salary and 
salary range being effective as of July 1, 
1963. (Above wordin approved by the Uni- 
versity Legal Counsel) 

In order to affirm the powers and authority of the Uni- 
versity Board of Trustees, under Chapter 648, Acts of 1962, it was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That pursuant to Section 6 of Chapter 775 
of the Acts of 1963, those members of the 
professional staff of the University, whose 
salaries are allocated to the so-called "E" 
schedule, not having heretofore been changed 
or fixed by the Board of Trustees acting 
under and pursuant to Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 75, as amended, are hereby re- 
allocated to the same job group and step in 
the next "E" Salary Schedule established by 
Section 6 of Chapter 775, Acts of 1963, said 
change of salary and salary range being 
effective as of July 1, 1963, for appointments 
on an annual basis and as of September 1, 1963, 
for appointments on a ten months basis. (Above 
wording approved by the University Legal 
Counsel) 

It was pointed out that Section 9 of Chapter 775 requires 
that the Demonstration Teachers employed by the University be 
granted a basic 10$ salary increase. The committee, therefore, upon 
motion being duly made and seconded 

VOTED: That pursuant to Section 9 of Chapter 775 
of the Acts of 1963, an increase of 10$ in 
the rate of payment to the Demonstration 
Teachers in the Mark's Meadow School is 
authorized effective September 1, 1963, 
payable from subsidiary account -03 funds. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The above motion is necessary in order to authorize 
University payments for such services from 03 funds. 

The Treasurer noted that the proposed recommendation for 
salary increases to the pullorum disease testers was not required 
by Chapter 775, but could be taken by the Trustees acting under 
autonomy povrers. Such action vrould affect four or five continuing 
employees of the University who are engaged in carrying out control 
service functions. The proposal is being made as an equity action 
in order that all employees, whether they are appointed or con- 
tinuing employees, be treated equitably in terms of salary personne 
actions. Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the rate of compensation for services 
performed by pullorum disease testers is 
increased by 10^ effective November 25, 
1963, payable from subsidiary account -03 
funds. 

The above vote is necessary to authorize payments from 
subsidiary account 03 funds. 

The Treasurer noted that Trust Fund employees are a 
special group of University employees supported by revolving-type 
(Trust) funds, including Boarding Halls, Student Union and Health 
Services. The President noted that although at one time there had 
been a disparity between salaries of this group and other Univer- 
sity employees (advantageous to the Trust Fund employees) this 
divsparity has been gradually removed over time. The University has 
now reached a point where salaries are comparable for given 
positions, In order to maintain this comparability and for basic 
equity purposes, these employees are being proposed for the basic 
salary adjustment granted to other staff members. In order to 
identify the continuing Trust Fund employees (as distinct from 
temporary employees in Trust Fund operations) reference is made in 
the proposed vote to positions listed in the Operating Budget for 
Fiscal Year 1964 and the Operating Budget - Trust Funds for Fiscal 
1964. as a means of properly identifying these employees. This 
action v/ould be one the Trustees could take under autonomy powers. 
Upon motion being duly made and seconded, the committee 

VOTED; Each person not otherwise receiving a 

salary increase under authority of Chapter 
775 of the Acts of 1963 and paid from 
trust funds who is in a position listed in 
the Operating Budget for Fiscal Year 1964 
and the Operating Budgets - Trust Funds for 
Fiscal Year 1964 as approved by the Trustees 
on July 2, 1963 or as subsequently added to 
by authority of the Trustees or the Presi- 
dent shall receive a 10$ increase in salary 
as of July 1, 1963 for persons on annual 
appointment or September 1, 1963 for persons 
on academic-year appointment, said increase 
to be paid from the appropriate trust fund. 



2471 



Salary 

Increases for 
Pullorum 
Disease 
Testers 



Salary 

Increases for 
Trust Fund 
Fmployees 



1472 



COMMITTEE 



Classifica- 
tion of 
Position 
Titles 



Policy 
Guidelines 
for Merit 
Salary 
Increases 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The above votes complete all necessary actions to grant 
a basic 10$ salary increase to members of the University staff. 
Henceforth personnel actions taken in regard to Chapter 775 will be 
on a merit basis and under complete Trustee autonomy authority. 
(It may be that decisions will be made in the state government as 
to certain positions being classified as of April 1, 1964 as pro- 
fessional according to the Federal Dictionary of Occupational List- 
ings. If any members of the University staff are to be affected by 
such reclassifications, the Trustees will be notified.) It is 
anticipated that in the future merit increases will be effective 
February 1, 196/+ and all professional staff will be classified into 
the new General Salary Schedule if they are not already thereon, 
and thereby become "autonomous" employees. 

The President called attention to the proposed Classi- 
fication of Titles (Document 64-026) . He stated that this is an 
opening up of salary ranges for the academic ranks in order to move 
them toward a more realistic salary structure. Because of Chapter 
775, this desirable new classification is now possible. The mini- 
mums listed are up 10$ from the former minimum.? and the top of the 
ranges are up 30^ from the former maximums. This, of course, does 
not necessarily mean that all or any faculty members will be 
immediately placed at maximums; any increases granted must be in- 
dividually recommended on the basis of meritorious service and 
according to the procedures adopted by the Trustees in regard to 
professional personnel policies (Document 63-050). 

After motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the classification of Position 

Titles effective on and after November 22, 
1963, as shown in Document 6-4-026 are 
recommended to the Board of Trustees for 
approval. 

The President stated that merit salary increases 
authorized under Chapter 775, to be effective February 1, 1964, 
should be based upon policy guidelines which will improve the basic 
salary structure for the University staff and vail best meet the 
competitive needs of the academic market place. After general 
discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; That the committee recommend to the Board 
of Trustees that thepoliey for allocating 
merit increases effective February 1, 1964, 
shall be: 

a. Highest priority is to be placed on the 
upper two academic ranks. 

b. Recommended salaries are to be adjusted 
to the new General Salary Schedule. 



II 



COMMITTEE 



! 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



c. Due consideration shall be given to those 
persons promoted "by the Board of Trustees 
on June 8, 1963, without salary increase 
at that time. 

d. Commonwealth Professor titles are titles 
of distinction, but do not automatically 
imply higher salaries than those of full 
professors . 

The President mentioned that there axe a number of 
critical backlog items requiring committee consideration, including 
the handling of the merit portions of the pending salary increases, 
the recommendations for those previously receiving dry promotions, 
and a possible nominee for University Secretary. He, therefore, 
suggested it would be highly desirable to hold another committee 
meeting prior to the December Board meeting. The committee agreed 
that if it were possible for the next full Board meeting to take 
place either December 18, 19 or 20, it "would then be possible for 
the committee to meet December 11 at 3:30 p.m. in the President's 
0^-Pice at the University. The Acting Secretary was instructed to 
explore the possibilities for adjusting the meeting schedules 
according to these suggested dates. 

Dean Moyer Hunsberger, College of Arts and Sciences, was 
invited to the meeting to explain the staffing situation in the 
Mathematics Department. The Dean pointed out that there is as 
pressing a need for academic planning as there is for physical 
planning and that at the University the physical planning has, in 
his opinion, been much more highly developed than the academic 
planning. In order to focus upon the Mathematics Department 
problems, it is necessary to have in mind a five-year prospective. 
To achieve this, Arts and Sciences has evaluated the development of 
three good departments of the University during a past five-year 
period. They found the following results: 



2473 



Departments of Psychology, 
Chemistry and Zoology 



1955-61 


Rate of 


5-year Plan 


(Ave.) 


Growth 


Math. 1963-68 


Enrollment 


1.62 


1,49 


Number of Faculty 


1.87 


1.74 


Average Faculty Salary 


1.35 


1.67 


Total Faculty Salary 


2.52 


' 2.90 


Total Costs 


2.94 


2.79 



The problem of seeking a new head for the Mathematics 
Department has created, the Dean said, a need to look at the future 
of this department. The present status of the department is low, 
yet Mathematics is as crucial to sciences as English is to the 
Social Sciences and Humanities. Both are "languages" that are basic 



— 



Next Meeting 
of Faculty 
& Program of 
Study 
Committee 



Mathematics 
Department 
Staffing 
Problems 



2474 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

tools of the intellect. For large areas of University instruction 
to progress, Mathematics must be developed more strongly. However, 
the supply of competent mathematicians is extremely limited and the 
market, therefore, is very high. Good ones, in addition to command- 
ing respectable salaries, desire to know that an institution has a 
firm commitment to the concept ofhaving a strong Mathematics De- 
partment. To highlight the problem of the shortage in 
mathematicians the Dean presented the following table showing the 
comparison of production of chemists compared to mathematicians. 

Comparative Output of Chemists & Mathematicians 
(United States) 



Ph.D.'s Granted in I960 



Chemistry 
10/ f 8 



Mathematics 
303 



An additional table showed the increased tightness of the 
market for mathematicians: 



Degrees of Mathematics Faculty 
(U.S. Universities & Colleges) 

1953 
% of new college Math. Teachers with Ph.D.'s 34% 
% of new college Math. Teachers with less than 

masters 8^ 

(from survey of Am. Math. Society) 



1258 
20$ 



The Dean then distributed materials on a Five- Year De- 
velopment Plan for Mathematics ( 1963-64 to 1968-69), Document 
64-035. The Dean discussed this five-year plan which proposed to 
place some emphasis upon increasing the number of Mathematics 
faculty members, the average faculty salary in Mathematics, and the 
total cost of the Mathematics Department during the next five years. 
The Dean pointed out that not only would this be necessary in order 
to properly handle increased enrollments and to develop a strong 
undergraduate program and a doctoral program of high quality but 
further, such a plan would not be devoting any more (or even as 
much) resources to the Mathematics Department than had been granted 
to the Departments of Psychology, Chemistry and Zoology in the 
previous past period. 

The Chairman thanked the Dean for an excellent presentation 
of information of the type strongly desired by the Trustees. She 
raised the question, however, as to how the proposed Mathematics 
Department plan fits into the total University budgets and long- 
range planning for all academic areas of the institution. The 
President stated that as a basic rule, Deans must operate within 
their allocated budgets and building up one department vis-a-vis 
any others must be done within available resources. He noted that 
hard and fast long-range commitments may not be feasible or de- 
sirable in situations of dynamic change. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman requested the President to ask the Provost 
to prepare a position paper on the future of the Mathematics De- 
partment for consideration at a future meeting of the committee. 
She expressed appreciation to the Dean for the informed presenta- 
tion and expressed the hope that similar presentations for other 
areas of University instruction could be made to the committee from 
time to time, The committee was favorably impressed by the plan 
for the Mathematics Department and expressed hope that the Dean 
would move toward such objectives as set forth in the plan, during ■ 
the coming years. 

The President stated that the University has a strong de- 
sire to obtain a top flight Dean of Engineering in order to move 
the Engineering School forward to new dimensions of instruction, 
research and service. He presented a memorandum to the committee 
which showed the existing patterns of salaries for Engineering 
Deans- in various representative institutions in the country. He 
noted that the dimensions of the national salary picture for Engi- 
neering Deans would require a comparable top flight salary for a 
Dean of our Engineering School that would revolve around $20,000 
and up. The search, by a qualified committee, for such a Dean in- 
volves both present staff and outside possibilities. 

The committee requested the Chairman to refer the matter 
to the Board of Trustees. 

The President called the committee's attention to item 6 
of his confidential memorandum regarding the Trustee request for a 
list of major appointments that would be referred to the Committee 
on Faculty and Program of Study prior to recommendation of the 
President to the Board. The list cited the Provost, Treasurer, 
Secretary, academic Deans (Dean of the Medical School in the 
future), and the Dean of Students. The President stated that these 
were the major policy positions in the University, 

There was committee discussion on the role of Trustees 
and Trustee committees in personnel policies and academic programs. 
It was agreed that one function of the Trustees is to analyze, in 
detail, selected general conditions and procedures with a view 
toward improving policies and general procedures. As an example, 
it was cited that an analysis of educational training and degrees 
of new appointments to the University staff could be made for 
Trustee information. After general discussion, it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : To -forward the report of the President 
in regard to major appointments to the 
Board of Trustees for their consideration. 

There being no further business, the committee adjourned 
at 4:38 p.m. 




Leo F. 
Acting Secretary, Board of Trustees 



2475 



Critical 

Engineering 

Salaries 



Major 
Appointments 



;476 



COMMITTEE 



Tenure 
Policy 



Nepotism 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

December 11, 1963, 3:30 p.m., President's Office, Campus 



PRESENT : Chairman Schuck, President Lederle, Trustees 
Crowley, Haigis, Plimpton, Provost Woodside, 
Acting Secretary Redfern 

A quorum being present, the Chairman called the meeting 
to order at 3:4-0 p.m. 

In regard to agenda item 1, the President explained that 
a faculty committee has been working with the University legal 
counsel to draft a tenure policy proposal to submit to the Faculty 
Senate. The Senate considered a preliminary draft on December 5 
and referred the draft back to the faculty committee with sug- 
gestions in regard to certain details. In the near future, 
Senate action should be completed and the proposal forwarded to 
the President, who will submit a recommendation on tenure policy 
to the Faculty and Program of Study Committee for their considera- 
tion and referral to the Board. He noted that the proposal in its 
present form follows the general principles and procedures of the 
recommended policy of the American Association of University Pro- 
fessors, except for requirements needed to conform with Massa- 
chusetts 1 statutes or for differences required by University of 
Massachusetts' conditions. In response to a question, he indicated 
that such a policy if and when adopted would not be retroactive 
except for those members hired under autonomy actions. 

The committee then discussed Document 64-037 in regard to 
Tenure and Nepotism. The President explained that there is a grow- 
ing difficulty in hiring only one member of a husband and wife 
family where both family members may be professionally qualified 
for collegiate teaching. A basic problem is to avoid to the 
greatest extent the hiring of such teams within the same depart- 
ment, although exceptional circumstances, such as a Dr. and Madam 
Curie, might warrant special consideration should such a prospect 
develop. The President indicated that he may be required to exer- 
cise discretion when confronted with tenure proposals involving 
individuals in the same family so long as their appointments are in 
different departments. In view of the fact that we have a great 
need for qualified faculty, and the relative shortage in certain 
fields, it may be necessary to decide these cases on an individual 
basis in order to maintain the quality and continuation of certain 
University programs. 

It was the consensus of the committee that the President 
should use discretion in handling this type of situation. 



2477 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



At the request of the President, Dr. Redfern discussed 
the status of the work of a committee developing a proposal for 
, TTEE University activity in the area of Labor Relations and Labor 

Studies. He noted that this activity had been stimulated in part 
by a request from the Massachusetts State Council - AFL-CIO - in- 
quiring as to the interest of the University in expanding its 
programs and services in this area. Dr. Redfern indicated that the 
committee will meet with a representative committee of the State 
Labor Council in the near future and, hopefully, be able to report 
early in the new year. At the present time the University com- 
mittee envisages two basic approaches: 

(1) A program of extension-type services in the 
field of Labor Unions and Labor Relations 
established organizationally under a Center 
for Labor Relations; such a unit conducting 
off -campus short courses, institutes, and 
conferences as well as on-campus activities 
of a similar nature; 

(2) A relating together of current University 
course offerings, with the possible 
addition of a few selected core courses, 
to provide at the undergraduate level a 
field of concentration available to students 
majoring in a regular department of the Uni- 
versity but having a special interest in 
concentrating in Labor Relations; and also 
a possible Master of Science degree program 
in Labor Studies. The academic phases of the 
proposed program would be under an inter- 
disciplinary committee of faculty members 
while the extension-type activities would 
be under a director of Labor Relations and 
his staff who, hopefully, would hold through 
joint appointments academic rank in appro- 
priate related regular departments of the 
University. 

The committee discussed briefly some of the implications 
of such a proposed program, particularly in terms of extension of 
the University services and facilities. 

The President submitted his nomination for Secretary and 
Director of University Relations and indicated that he felt 
especially pleased that the University is able to attract a person 
of the experience and capability of the candidate. He indicated 
that at the salary recommended it would have been impossible to 
obtain this man on financial grounds alone, for his present 
employer was willing to match our offer and, in addition, a large 
state university on the West Coast had tendered an offer to the 
same individual substantially above what we were offering. However, 



Labor 

"Education 

Program 



University 
Secretary and 
Director of 
University 
Relations 



2478 



COMMITTEE 



Procedures 
for Seeking 
New Provost 



Personnel 
Actions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



because of the candidate's long interest in the University of Massa. 
chusetts and his commitment to the institution and the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, it had been possible tc obtain his agreement to 
accept this appointment if it were tendered to him. The President 
mentioned that he had been soliciting nominations for such a candi- 
date for an extended period of time including numerous discussions 
at national conferences. During the course of this search, Robert 
McCartney's name had continually been mentioned as an excellent 
choice if he could be attracted to the University of Massachusetts. 

After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the recommendation of Robert J. 
McCartney as University Secretary and Director 
of University Relations. 

The President informed the committee that he has appointee 
a distinguished faculty committee to work with him in the selection 
of candidates for the position of University Provost. The com- 
mittee members are: Professor John Blackmore, CHAIRMAN, Head of 
Department, Agricultural and Food Economics; Professor Ralph 
Pippert, School of Education; Associate Professor George Richason, 
Chemistry Department, and an alumnus of the University; Professor 
Robert Potash, History Department; Commonwealth Professor Charles 
Cox, Microbiology. The President further noted that several weeks 
ago faculty were requested to submit to the Acting Secretary names 
of any candidates they wish the committee to consider and that 
these names have now been turned over to the committee for their 
assessment and evaluation. In addition, of course, the committee 
will conduct a nation-wide search for the most qualified candidate 
available and will consider present staff members of the University 
in addition to those qualified persons called to the committee's 
attention who are now outside the University community. The 
recommendation for this appointment would, of course, be referred 
to the Faculty and Program of Study Committee. 

At the request of the President, the Provost called the 
committee's attention to a Dean's oversight in the emergency salary 
adjustments which had been voted by the Board of Trustees at its 
last meeting. After consideration of Document 64-04-0, it was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED: That, pursuant to undertakings heretofore given 
to certain staff members of the professional 
staff of the University on the basis of which 
said members have been performing services for 
the University since September 2, 1963, said 
undertakings having been given with the 
knowledge of the Board of Trustees but with 
respect to which recorded action by the Board 
of Trustees has been deferred pending enactment 
of Chapter 775 of the Acts of 1963, the 



I 



:OMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



classification, title, salary and salary 
range of the following named member of the 
professional staff of the University is 
hereby approved, authorized, confirmed and 
ratified, effective September 2, 1963, 
under and pursuant to Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 75, as amended, particularly 
Section 14 thereof, namely; 



Name 



Title 



Classification 



Salary Range 
Minimum Maximum 



Weekly 
Salary 
Effective 

9/M£ 



Annual 
Salary 



Singer, F.A. Prof.,U.M. $179.30 $364.25 $226.40 $11,772. 8C 



The President informed the committee that although it was 
the intention of the administration to keep the committee informed, 
to the greatest practical extent of plans and developments in the 
various academic units of the University, it was not intended that 
the Board be requested to vote upon such plans and programs. How- 
ever, he added, in the case of seeking a new head of the Mathematics 
Department, he had been informed by the Dean of Arts and Sciences 
and the Provost that a vote of the Board in regard to plans for 
that department is considered necessary in order to obtain the type 
of faculty desired for the department . He slated in response to 
inquiry from the committee that it is not his present intention to 
recommend this type of action for any other department in the 
college although he has requested the Provost to see that similar 
departmental plans are submitted for informational purposes only to 
the Faculty and Program of Study Committee as soon as such plans 
can be properly developed and evaluated. The Provost reported that 
these requests for five-year plans ?;ere made to the Deans some time 
ago. 

There was some discussion as to the difficulty of 
effectively integrating the work of a Mathematics Department into 
the total needs of a university or college. It was pointed out 
that in many institutions the Departments of Physics and Chemistry, 
and related fields, frequently need applied mathematical services 
?/hereas Mathematics Departments tend to build up theoretical 
strengths; this then forces the other departments to develop their 
own mathematical services within their own staffs, which may be 
qualified in varying degrees for mathematical instruction. The 
question was asked the President as to the relationship of the 
proposed Mathematics Department program to the total Arts and 
Sciences budget. The President responded there was no intention to 
increase the Arts and Sciences budget beyond what would be normally 
anticipated, merely due to approval of this plan for the Mathematics 
Department. The Dean Yfould be expected to develop the plan for 

this department, as well as to encourage the development of all 
departments of this college, within the resources he is allocated. 



2479 



Five-Year 
Plan for 
Mathematics 
Department 



2480 



COMMITTEE 



Proposed 

Humanities 
Interchange 



Other 
business 



Next 
Meeting 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board approve in 
principle the five-year plan for the 
Mathematics Department as contained in 
Document 64-035a. 

The President called the attention of the committee to 
Document 64-039 which contained some details in regard to pre- 
liminary exploration which is underway to develop a Humanities 
Interchange Program with Hokkaido University (Japan) . The President 
said that the tentative proposal has already been checked out Y/ith 
the United States State Department and they have indicated a favor- 
able attitude. He noted that the proposal would have a man-to-man 
exchange of qualified faculty between the University of Massa- 
chusetts and Hokkaido University. It will not, he said, involve 
state funds for our-of-state travel for under the proposal State 
Department funds would support this phase of the program. It was 
noted that this is an excellent means for promoting the continuation 
of a long standing association of the University of Massachusetts 
in the Far East and that such a relationship has proved of 
beneficial and constructive value to the University, the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, and the United States. 

It was the consensus of the committee to encourage the 
administration to proceed with further negotiations in regard to 
firming up the proposal. The Chairman of the committee agreed to 
inform the Board of Trustees of this proposed interchange program. 

The committee authorized the Acting Secretary, Leo 
Redfern, to send a letter on behalf of the Board to Mr. Marshall 0. 
Lanphear to be included in the testimonial portfolio being pre- 
sented to Mr. Lanphear on the occasion of his retirement after 4-2 
years of distinguished service to the University. The Chairman 
indicated an interest in having, at some future meeting of the com- 
mittee, a presentation by Dr. Field and other appropriate staff 
members on the residential college proposal. 

It was agreed that the date for the next committee meet- 
ing should be Tuesday, January 7, 1964, at 2:00 p.m. in the Presi- 
dent's Office on campus. There being no further business, the 
meeting adjourned at 5:16 p.m. 

/ Leo F. nectrern 
Acting Secretary, Board of Trustees 





I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MUTES OF MEETING OF TRIT^ EXECUTIVE oa<MTTFF 
n e^mber 16, 1963, 3:40 p.m., Parker House, Boston 



"32N£« A ^ting Chairman Healey, President 
Lederle, Trustees Brett, Crowley, 

Fox, Pumphret, Acting Secretary 
p sdfern 



The Acting Chairman convened the meeting at 3*40 p.m. 
and upon indicating the business of the meeting as being selection 
of honorary degree candidates, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED: That the committee go into executive 
session. 

At the conclusion of the executive session, the Chairman 
was instructed to report the results to the full Board at the 
December 20 meeting. 

At the request of the Chairman, the President 
temporarily left the room, After general discussion, it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board approval of 
the following motion: 

. Pursuant to Chapter 801, Acts of 1963, 
the Board of Trustees approves the 
salary of $27,500 annually for the 
President of the University of Massa- 
chusetts and, in accordance with said 
Act, such salary shall be retroactive 
to July 1, 1963. 

The President, upon his, return to the meeting, ex- 
plained that the administration was in the process of developing 
suggestions in regard to revision of the By-laws of the Board of 
Trustees. The committee requested the President to see if it 
would be possible to send a draft of such revision to the Executive 
Committee accompanied by an explanatory memorandum that would 
discuss the substantive section of the draft and would indicate 
recommended. changes from present policy and procedure. The Chair- 
man indicated that some indication of what other institutions had 
in this regard would be useful. It was also suggested that the 
draft be checked with the University's legal counsel. 



2481 



President's 
Salary 



By-Law 
Revision 



2482 



COMMITTEE 



Informal 
Report on 
Building 
Authority 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



There was brief discussion of the prono^al that electric 
h^at be considered in future building facilities. It was noted 
that this matter is under study by the Buildings and ^rounds 
Committee but was discv for the "information of the Executive 
Committee, including Mr, Pumphret of the Building Authority. 
Mr. Pumphret distributed ro^-f estimates for the University of 
Massachusetts Building Authority project 3 (fining Commons), -^or 
(sc ii+ " rwest phase I) dormitories and Sports Facility, and 5 (south- 
west area Dining '"'o^non^ Cor the information of the 
Committee, with the comment that he would request appropriate vo + 
at the Dec^her* ?0 ^oa^d meeting, T 'r. Pumphret added that " r ork on 
the dormitories on the hill were nor progressing satisfactorily 
^Toximately 40$ of the work is et ted as being complete). 

^here being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 5:?3 -n.m. 




9 ^ 
Acting °* n r^ 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



D 



2483 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
December 16, 1963, 5:38 p.m., Parker House, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Healey, President Lederle, 

Trustees Brett, Fox, Pumphret, Emerson, 
Treasurer Johnson, Acting Secretary 
Redfern, Mr. John M. Wood and 
Mr. Edward H. Ladd - both of 
Standish, Ayer & McKay 

The meeting was convened by the Chairman at 5:38 p.m. 

With the permission of the Chairman, Mr. Wood and Mr. Ladd 
distributed a table on college endowment fund figures which indi- 
cated the distribution of investment portfolios of selected New 
England and American Colleges and Universities. A discussion was 
held on the "Report on Endowment and Operating Funds of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts as of October 1, 1963". The basic 
recommendation of the investment counsel was to lighten holdings in 
utilities especially telephone, and to move into industrials as a 
means of balancing total holdings. The details of this recommenda- 
tion are shown on page 7 of the Report on Endowment. 

The Treasurer reported free cash on hand of slightly over 
$9,500. He also called the committee's attention to a request from 
Kappa Sigma fraternity to add to their present mortgage now held by 
the University. The committee felt, however, that they should 
adhere to Board policy of letting fraternity mortgages be 
terminated over time and not adding new investments in this type 
of holding. 

The Treasurer reported $3,04-1,399 in operating funds are 
now drawing interest. After general discussion, it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson: 



To sell; 



230 shares of American Tel. & Tel. 
200 shares of Niagara Mohawk 
300 shares of Pacific Gas & Electric 
100 shares of Paramount Pictures 
120 shares of So. N. E. Tel. 
75 shares of United Fruit 
210 shares of Virginia Electric & Power 



To buy: 



300 shares 
200 shares 
300 shares 

42 shares 
300 shares 

50 shares 
300 shares 



of American Metal Climax 

of Armco Steel 

of Clark Equipment 

of First National Boston 

of Goodyear Tire 

of Union Carbide 

of Warren (S.D.) 



Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 



■84 



COMMITTEE 



Tax 

Sheltered 
Annuities 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve the investment of $9,589.62 
of cash on hand and other surplus cash 
from security transactions in bonds as 
listed by Standish, Ayer & McKay and 
said selection to be made by the Uni- 
versity Treasurer in consultation with 
Standish, Ayer & McKay from the follow- 
ing list with preference to Consolidated 
Edison: 

Moody's Mkt. Yield to 1 

Rating Par Value Issue Price Value Income Maturity 

' U.S. Treasury 4's 98 7/8 $19,775 $800 4.15$ 
8/15/73 

American Tel. 2 3/4 91 1/2 9,150 
2/1/71 



Aaa 


$20,000 


Aaa 


10,000 


N.R. 


10,000 


Aa 


10,000 


Aa 


10,000 


N.R. 


10,000 



Commercial Cred. 

4i 10/1/74 
Consol. Edison 

4 5/8 12/1/93 
Pac.Gas & Elec. 

4i 6/1/96 
G.M.A.C. 4i 
11/1/85 



99 1/2 9,950 

102.046 15,307 

100 3/8 10,037 

100 10,000 



275 
425 

694 
450 
450 



4.31 

4.30 
4.50 
4.48 
4.50 



$75,000 



$74,219 $3,094 



The Treasurer reviewed previous consideration that had 
been given to tax sheltered annuities and he suggested that the 
procedure should allow the employee who desires to purchase such 
annuity contracts to be permitted to select the company of his 
choice provided these firms are authorized to conduct such business 
in Massachusetts. After general discussion, it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : That the Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts hereby declare that it is 
desirable, in the best interests of the 
University and of the Commonwealth, that 
the Board of Trustees of the University 
act under Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 15, Section 18A, as inserted by 
Chapter 466 of the Acts of 1963, in enter- 
ing into written agreements with such em- 
ployees at the University as may so desire 
to purchase individual annuity contracts 
for such employees as authorized by said 
Chapter 1BA and to make the premium pay- 
ments due under said annuity contracts 
so long as the individual employee con- 
tinues to be employed at the University, 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



y 



2485 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

provided, that the aggregate amount of 
premium payments made in any one year 
under all annuity contracts purchased 
for any employee shall not, when added 
to the "includible compensation", as de- 
fined in Section 403(h) of the Internal 
Revenue Code of 1954- and regulations 
thereunder as then in effect, paid to 
such employee in respect of such year, 
exceed the annual rate fixed by the 
Board of Trustees prior to the commence- 
ment of such year as the annual rate of 
compensation for the office or position 
occupied by the employee during such year, 
said annual rate to be adjusted in 
accordance with any promotions, transfers 
or changes occurring during such year; 

That such individual annuity contracts shall 
be purchased only from such insurers 
authorized to issue life insurance or annuity 
contracts in the Commonwealth as the employees 
for whom they are purchased may elect, pro- 
vided that, as to any employee or prospective 
employee at the University who has an annuity 
contract in force for at least ninety days 
prior to the execution of a written agreement 
hereunder with such employee or prospective 
employee, said agreement may provide that 
premium payments may be continued under such 
contract subsequent to the effective date of 
such agreement, without regard to whether or 
not such contract has been issued by an in- 
surer authorized to issue such contracts in 
the Commonwealth, but said agreement shall 
provide that any subsequent contract pur- 
chased thereunder shall be purchased only 
from such insurer authorized to issue life 
insurance or annuity contracts in the Common- 
wealth as the employee or prospective employee 
shall elect; 

That the rights of the employee under any 
individual annuity contract purchased for 
him hereunder shall be non-f orf eitable ; and 

That the Treasurer of the University of 
Massachusetts for the time being in office 
be and he hereby is authorized in the name 
and on behalf of the Board of Trustees of 
the University to enter into written agree- 
ments with employees at the University as 
authorized hereunder, to give such notices 



2486 



COMMITTEE 



University 

Vehicle 

Insurance 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



and make such certificates, in such form, 
as may be required by Section ISA and to 
take such other action and do such other 
things as to him may seem necessary or 
desirable to be done or taken to carry 
into effect the making of written agreements 
as hereby authorized, the purchase of in- 
dividual annuity contracts thereunder and 
the payment of premiums thereon. 

The Treasurer submitted copies of correspondence re- 
ceived from a number of insurance firms in regard to automobile in- 
surance coverage. In addition, he distributed copies of Sections 
3b and 3c of Chapter 12 of the General Laws of Massachusetts deal- 
ing with indemnification of state offices and settlement of certain 
claims against state employees. After general discussion, the 
committee requested that the Attorney General be solicited for his 
opinion on the following questions: 

1. What is the policy and what has been the policy 
of the Attorney General as to handling civil 
claims, specifically automobile accidents in- 
volving personal injury or property damage when 
one of the parties is a state employee? 

2. What is the policy and what has been the policy 
of the Attorney General as to handling civil 
suits, specifically automobile accidents in- 
volving personal injury or property damage when 
one of the parties is a state employee? 

3. What is the present policy of the Attorney 
General's office on such civil claims up to 
$10,000? 

4-. What is the present policy of the Attorney 
General's office on such civil suits up to 
$10,000? 

5. What is the present policy of the Attorney 
General's office on such civil claims of 
$10,000 and above? 

6. What is the present ^policy of the Attorney 
General's office on such civil suits of 
$10,000 and above? 

7. What is done by any branch of the government of 
the Commonwealth as to conducting investigation 
and report upon receipt of notification of an 
accident involving a state employee driving a 
vehicle owned by the Commonwealth? 



I 



:OMMITTEE 



I 



J 



8. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Would it be possible under existing statutes 
and regulations for the University of Massa- 
chusetts to purchase "excess coverage" in- 
surance for its motor vehicles? 



9. 



10. 



11. 



If it is permissible for the University of 
Massachusetts to purchase "excess coverage" 
insurance for its motor vehicles, would the 
Attorney General assume defense of cases 
covered by such insurance? 

Has every operator of a Commonwealth vehicle 
against whom a claim or a suit been filed 
been fully protected regardless of the amount 
involved? 

How many private bills have been introduced 
in the General Court to take care of claims 
or judgments against drivers of state-owned 
vehicles in the period 1952-1962 and what 
has been the disposition of bills so intro- 
duced? 



The Treasurer noted that among the subsidiary accounts 
in the state appropriation, certain adjustments are necessary to 
balance payments for personal services. At the same time there 
have been heavier expenditures than anticipated for transporting 
nursing students to affiliated hospitals. To remedy this 
situation and to place available funds within the appropriate sub- 
sidiary accounts where they are required, will necessitate a trans- 
fer between subsidiary accounts. After general discussion, it 
was moved, seconded and 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the transfers recorded in the 
attached Document 6/4-04-3 be authorized. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 7:45 p.m. 



2487 



Transfer 
of Funds 



Leo F. Redfern 
Acting Secretary 



2488 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COIvI/HTTEE 
December 20, 1963, 12:15 p.m., Sheraton-Plaza Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Acting Chairman Heale~ ; , President Lederle, 
Trustees Brett, Crowley (who arrived later 
in the meeting), Acting Secretary Redfern 

The Acting Chairman convened the meeting at 12:15 p.m. 
and upon indicating the "business of the meeting as being selection 
of honorary degree candidates, it v/as moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the committee go into executive session. 

At the conclusion of the executive session, the Chairman 
was instructed to report the results of the meeting to the full 
Board together with the report he had been previously instructed 
to make in regard to the Executive Committee meeting of 
December 16, 1963. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 12:35 p.m. 




Leo F. Kear$rn 
Acting Secretary 



:OMMITTEE 



2489 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

January 7, 1964, 2:00 p.m., President's Office 



PRESENT : Trustee Schuck, President Lederle, 
Trustees Haigis and Plimpton, 
Treasurer Johnson, Acting Secretary 
Redfern, Assistant to the Provost 
Venman, and Assistant Director, 
Office of Institutional Studies 
Raymond Castelpoggi 

A quorum being present, the Chairman called the meeting 
to order at 2:00 p.m. 

At the request of the President, Dr. Venman explained 
the objectives and purposes of the proposed curriculum changes in 
the Graduate School program. He noted that the proposed Business 
Administration courses were planned toward eventual development of 
the M.A. in Finance; the Chemistry course recognizes new develop- 
ments in this area; that the Romance Languages course would take 
advantage of the expertise of a new staff member in this field; 
and that the German course is an expansion in the present offering 
in this field and will be offered by a nationally distinguished 
scholar recently appointed in that department. He noted that the 
proposed courses would require no additional staff, were designed 
to meet an existing student demand, and were screened and approved 
by the Graduate Council. After general discussion, it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : That the committee recommend to the Board 
approval of the changes in the Graduate 
curriculum as set forth in memorandum 
dated January 3, 1964 from the Graduate 
Office to Dr. Redfern, Acting Secretary 
of the University. (Document 64-049) 

Dr. Robert Gage, Chairman, Department of Public Health, 
was invited into the meeting to provide information in regard to 
the proposed Medical Technology program. Dr. Gage explained the 
great existing need for Medical Technologists at the present time 
and outlined how the proposed three-plus-one program is designed 
to incorporate both a bachelors degree program and Medical 
Technology training (which includes hospital clinical experience) 
for preparing for the Medical Technology examination. He 
emphasized that the three-plus-one program would be a voluntary 
program for the students, and indications are that approximately 
50$ of students interested in this field would continue to follow 
the present system of four years' college education plus one year 
of hospital training. He noted that the year of hospital training 
required under the proposed program would also include weekly 



Graduate 
Curriculum 



Medical 

Technology 

Program 



2490 



COMMITTEE 



Unde rgradua te 
Curriculum 



Transfer 
Policy 



Salary 
Adjustments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

seminars on campus for those students involved in this program in 
order to continue their involvement in academic pursuits. After 
general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the committee recommend the Board 
approve the proposed three-plus-one 
program for training of Medical 
Technologists as contained in the 
memorandum from Dr. Gage to the Provost 
dated November 19, 1963. (Document 64-O44) 

Dr. Venman explained the proposed curricula changes at 
the undergraduate level and emphasized that these had been care- 
fully screened according to the policies of the University Course 
of Study Committee and recommended by the appropriate curriculum 
committee and appropriate Deans. After general discussion, it was 
the consensus of the committee that the proposal for Sociology 55 
be referred back for further information on course description, 
syllabus, and other information related thereto. With this excep- 
tion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the committee recommend to the 
Board approval of the undergraduate 
curriculum changes as contained in 
Document 64.-O44. 

The President stated that it would be highly desirable 
to provide for a clearly understood policy of equitable treatment 
for those members of the University staff who might move from a 
non- tenured position to a tenured position which they might hold. 
The proposed policy provides for a basic minimum salary that will 
protect the persons involved, although if warranted a larger salary 
may be approved in deserving cases. It was agreed that legal 
counsel should review the proposal and suggest any desirable changes 
in Y/ording. After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the committee recommend the Board 
approve the policy in regard to trans- 
fer from a position without tenure to 
a position in which tenure is vested 
(Document 64-O48, which has been reviewed 
by legal counsel.) 

The President explained that the recommended salary 
adjustments were in conformance with the policy guidelines approved 
by the Board of Trustees: that highest priority be placed upon 
improvement of the upper two academic ranks, that recommended 
salaries are to be adjusted to the new general salary schedule of 
the Commonwealth, that due consideration shall be given to persons 
promoted on June 8, 1963 without salary increase at that time, and 
that Commonwealth Professor titles will not automatically be cause 
for a salary differential. In addition, he noted that no 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

recommended increase exceeded 30% of current salary, with the ex- 
ception of three or four cases that had previously been approved 
by the Board under the emergency salary adjustments. There had 
been diligent effort by the administration to maintain to the 
maximum degree appropriate balance among the schools and colleges 
and among comparable positions in the University. He further 
noted that in order to provide appropriate differentiation of pro- 
fessional from non-professional staff that all professional staff 
had received at least a minimum of 12% increase (which included the 
basic 10% approved by the Board at the November 22 meeting); that 
no new appointees had received more than the basic 10% across-the- 
board increase on the grounds that they were not entitled to 
anticipate, as had existing state employees, merit consideration 
after such short period of service in the University. 

The President called attention to Document 64-O46 
"Classification of Position Titles". He pointed out that sound 
personnel policy is to establish ranges for various positions and 
that this proposal is designed to further accomplish this 
objective. After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the committee recommend the Board 
approve the Classification of Position 
Titles effective on or after February 1, 
1964 as contained in Document 64-O46. 

And, it was further 

VOTED : The Classification of Position Titles 
under the provisions of Chapter 648 of 
the Acts of 1962 shall be fixed in a 
weekly salary range from a minimum or 
fixed at a specific weekly salary rate 
which shall not be changed except by 
vote of the Board of Trustees and such 
classification shall not be designated 
by any job group number or grade. 

And, it was further 

VOTED : In accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 648 of the Acts of 1962 
position titles in the Professional 
Staff are classified in the weekly 
salary range or at a weekly salary 
rate specified after the title of 
position in Document 64-O46 subject 
to subsequently being amended, revised, 
added to or repealed by the Board of 
Trustees under the provisions of said 
Chapter 648. 



2491 



Classification 
of Position 
Titles 



■92 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Chairman then took up the proposed salary adjustments 
and asked for committee consideration. At the request of the 
President, Mr. Raymond Castelpoggi, OIS, described a statistical 
analysis of the effect of the proposed salary adjustments, in- 
cluding comparisons with AAUP standards and analysis by academic 
ranks within the various schools and colleges of the University. 
After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the committee recommend the 

Board approve the salary adjustments 
as recommended by the President. 

There being no further business, the committee adjourned 
at 4:48 P.m. 




Leo F. Red 
Acting Secretary 
Board of Trustees 



;OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
January 8, 1964, 4:30 p.m., Parker House, Boston 



PRESENT : Trustee Healey, President Lederle, 
Trustees Brett, Crowley, Fox, 
Pumphret, Treasurer Johnson, Act- 
ing Secretary Redfern, Business 
Manager Grady 

A quorum being present, the Acting Chairman called the 
meeting to order at 4:30 p.m. 

There was extended discussion of the need for the Uni- 
versity to respond to the public interest in year-round activities 
of institutions of higher learning and to stress the extent to 
which the University is presently involved in year-round operations 
as well as the numerous efforts underway to explore appropriate 
methods of achieving optimum utilization of University facilities. 

The committee suggested that there ought to be developed 
a series of policy statements or position papers setting forth in 
positive terms the objectives and accomplishments of the University 
said statements to be issued by the Board, as appropriate, to 
better inform the public and interested persons as to the obliga- 
tions, role, service activities and objectives of the University. 
One such policy statement could deal with the future of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts in the service of the Commonwealth and 
touch upon such areas as a Medical School of high standards, the 
optimum use of University facilities, the leadership role of the 
University in public education, and the demands facing public 
higher education and their meaning for the University of Massa- 
chusetts. It was suggested that the informational services of the 
University should be structured to meet three requirements: 
(l) routine releases and immediate responses; (2) features and 
background articles dealing in depth with University programs and 
objectives, and (3) anticipation of emergency situations whenever 
possible. 

The committee explored the question of extending Uni- 
versity services and regarded favorably the general principle of 
establishing units of the University in areas of demonstrated need. 

There was extended discussion of the proposed By-Laws. 
The committee decided to continue consideration of this matter 
over to its next meeting and the chairman requested that the Presi- 
dent provide the committee with copies of the present By-Laws and 
any available sets of comparable By-Laws in use at other public 
institutions , 



2493 



Year-Round 
Activities 



Policy 
Statements 



By-Laws 



c. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 6:16 p.m. 





o F. Redfern 
Acting Secretary 
Board of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



! 



2495 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



JOINT MEETING OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
AND THE COMMITTEE ON LEGISLATION 

January 8, 1964, 6:18 p.m., Parker House, Boston 



PRESENT ; Trustee Pumphret, President 
Lederle, Trustees Brett, 
Crowley, Fox, -Troy, Thompson, 
Treasurer Johnson, Acting 
Secretary Redfern, Business 
Manager Grady 



The meeting convened at 6:18 p.m. There was discussion 
of the potential pressures for new professional schools and 
similar demands being requested of the University. Mr. Grady re- 
ported on bills filed in the General Court which are related in 
some degree to the University. Dr. Redfern reported on the 
Federal Physical Facilities Aid Act and the committee agreed that 
a new state commission would be needed to properly reflect the 
diversity of Massachusetts higher educational system in connection 
with the administration of this act within the Commonwealth. 
Mr. Grady reported on the Civil Service bill that had been filed 
in regard to non-professional staff at the University. It was the 
position of the committee that civil service for non-professionals 
would not be as effective in meeting the needs of the University 
and its employees as the present system of recruitment and pro- 
motion now used that stresses merit and most qualified candidates. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 9:25 p.m. 





^TVx, 



Leo F. Redfei 
Acting Secretary 
Board of Trustees 



2496 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

January 15, 1964, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Trustee Haigis, President Lederle, 
Trustees Brown, Brett, Schuck, 
Treasurer Johnson, Acting Secretary 
Redfern, Dr. Venman, Judge Blassberg 

The Chairman opened the meeting "by noting that item 1 on 
the agenda dealt with land acquisitions. At the request of the 
Chairman, the Treasurer reported upon the status of recent land 
acquisition matters. He stated that the usual process in land 
acquisition has been to negotiate with the owners prior to recommend 
ing Trustee action. Recently a news report stated that the 
Attorney General has indicated that in eminent domain proceedings 
by state agencies, it is preferable that the land-taking authority 
first issue a firm offer of record prior to instituting proceedings. 
The Treasurer reported that in each case offers had been made by 
the land agent but that a number of votes had been prepared to 
place these on record in connection with properties owned by 
Do leva, Howe, Kentfield, Paresky and V/oynar. He noted that the 
Howe, Kentfield, Paresky, and V/oynar properties have asking prices 
that are considerably divergent from the price the University has 
been willing to offer based upon appraisals it has had made on the 
properties. In response to a question, the Treasurer indicated 
there are about a dozen or more land acquisitions, authorized by 
statute, that are still pending final actions. All land, however, 
that is essential for the Stadium site itself is already in hand, 
through purchase or eminent domain takings (settlement of some 
eminent domain parcels may require extended time for ultimate 
resolution) . 

The committee concluded that in connection with the pro 
posed vote, the Treasurer, with the advice of Judge Blassberg, 
Y/ould consult with the Attorney General as necessary to insure 
proper compliance with desired procedures. After general discussion 
it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To make a matter of record the purchase 
offers made to the parties below whose 
property was taken by eminent domain 
under Chapter 79 of the General Laws, 
such offers being consistent in each 
case with the independent appraisals 
of the value of the land and buildings 
made by qualified disinterested appraisers 
and filed with the Treasurer of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts: 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

John S. and Margaret Do leva 

Parcel 5, Page 11-C, Amherst Town Atlas, 
Amherst, Mass. $1,500. 

Emery G. and Edith M. Howe 

North side of Rocky Hill Road, Hadley 
$34,000 

Frederick J. Kentfield, et al 

North side of Rocky Hill Road, Hadley, Mass. 

$1^,000 
Pro tanto payment of $12,000., representing 
60% of the average of all appraised valuations, 
was authorized by the Board of Trustees on 
November 22, 1963. 

Paul and Ada Paresky 

Parcel 56, Page 11-A, Amherst Town Atlas, 
Amherst, Mass. $26,600 

Katherine L. Woynar 

Parcel 5, Page 11-A, Amherst Town Atlas, 
Amherst, Mass. $17,000 

It was further 

VOTED : That the Treasurer of the University of 
Massachusetts, in the name and on behalf 
of the Board of Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts, direct a letter to each 
of the aforementioned property owners re- 
affirming the said offers of payments. 

At the request of the University, Judge Blassberg had 
made a prompt taking of the property held in the name of Willard 
0. Seibert, Trustee, to insure University access that was required 
in order to consolidate property holdings at the south end of the 
campus. It was agreed to accept an offer of settlement for this 
land and it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To pay to Willard 0. Seibert, Trustee of 
Greenfield, Massachusetts, the sum of 
Fifteen Thousand ($15,000.00) dollars for 
his property situate in Amherst, Hampshire 
County, Massachusetts, and more particularly: 
described in a deed to Willard 0, Seibert, 
Trustee, by deed recorded in the Hampshire 
County Registry of Deeds, Book 1365, Page 61, 
and being the same premises which were taken 
by eminent domain proceedings by the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts for the use of the 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts. 
Taxes on the said premises for the year 1962 



2497 



Doleva 
Property 



Howe 
Property 



Kentfield 
Property 



Paresky 
Property 



Woynar 
Property 



Seibert 
Property 



98 



COMMITTEE 



Lutheran 
Church 



Southwest 
Quadrangle 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

are to be paid in full by the said Willard 
0. Seibert, Trustee. The aforesaid payment 
is in accordance with an offer of settle- 
ment made to the University of Massachusetts 
by Willard 0. Seibert, Trustee. 

The Treasurer stated that the Lutheran Church is willing 
to sell to the University the back portion of their property on 
North Pleasant Street. After general discussion, it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : In accordance with Chapter 705, Acts of 1962, 
Item 8063-19, authorizing the Trustees of the 
University to acquire certain lands with the 
buildings thereon, for the development of the 
University, by purchase or by eminent domain 
under Chapter 79 of the General Laws, and the 
authority granted therein, independent 
appraisals of the value of the land and build- 
ings having been made by qualified disinterested 
appraisers, and filed with Kenneth W. Johnson, 
Treasurer, on motion duly made and seconded, 
it was unanimously 

VOTED : That the Trustees of the University purchase 
or take by eminent domain in fee, the 
property of the Atlantic District of the 
Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod on behalf 
of Immanuel Lutheran Church, Amherst, situate 
at North Pleasant Street in Amherst, Hampshire 
County, Massachusetts, and more particularly 
described as the eastern 2.92 acres more or 
less of Parcel 71, Page 8-A of the Town Atlas, 
Town of Amherst, and that the purchase price 
for said proper ;ty to be Four Thousand One 
Hundred ($4,100.00) Dollars. 

(Mr. Brett left at 12:13 p.m. because of a prior 
commitment) 

The committee requested Judge Blassberg to prepare the 
necessary motions required for taking certain parcels of land re- 
quired to implement the master planning program. The Treasurer in- 
dicated that future necessary land acquisitions may include areas 
for the second and third developments of the pending southwest 
dormitory complex and certain sections to the north of the campus. 
Trustee Schuck asked if the Amherst Creamery was included in the 
land to be taken for the southwest dormitory complex and who owned 
it. The Treasurer stated that it was owned by Louis Foods and 
that it was located south and east of the area planned by Sasaki 
Walker & Associates for the dormitories, it being on the east side 
of Sunset Avenue. Land being acquired is on the west of Sunset 
Avenue running south on the street to the intersection of Fearing 
Street. This has always been the Sasaki plan. Treasurer Johnson 



f- 






L 



COMMITTEE 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



asked if the Trustees desired to increase the land acquisition 
area to include the Amherst Creamery but there being no interest 
expressed, no action was taken. 

At the request of the Chairman, the Treasurer reported 
that appropriate standards for establishing rental rates for 
apartments and houses owned by the University is under study. The 
plan is to develop a formula that will be comparable to that used 
by the Commonwealth for the purpose of equalizing rental rates. 
The Treasurer said that the Housing Director was working on this 
problem and as soon as his study is completed, the report with 
appropriate recommendations will be presented to the committee. 

(Mr. Thompson arrived at 12:24- p.m.) 

The Treasurer informed the Chairman and the committee 
that the Machmer addition plans had been reviewed and accepted 
with minor modifications by Dean Belluschi. A_fter general 
discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve the preliminary plans for the 
addition to Machmer Hall as presented 
subject to the modifications suggested 
by Dean Belluschi and by Sasaki Walker & 
Associates. 

■ It was noted that the windows on the forthcoming south- 
west dormitories should, according to Dean Belluschi 's recommenda- 
tion, be of anodized aluminum for aesthetic as well as low 
maintenance purposes (otherwise painted steel windows require ex- 
tensive maintenance, especially on a 22-story structure). High 
maintenance costs for windows was not contemplated by the Uni- 
versity in the agreement with the Building Authority for these 
dormitories. The Chairman suggested that the Treasurer turn over 
copies of the letter from Dean Belluschi on this matter to 
Mr. Pumphret and Miss Schuck for consideration by the Building 
Authority. 

The President said the administration plans to come to 
the next committee meeting with requests for the Building Authority 
to build dormitories and dining halls in the southwest complex for 
use in September 1966 and 1967. 

The date for the next meeting was set at Friday, 
January 31, 1964 at 11:00 a.m. in the President's Office, South 
College. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 12:30 p.m. 




Leo F. Rec 
Acting Secretary 



2499 



Rental 
Rates 



Machmer 
Hall 



2500 



COMMITTEE 



Western 
Massachusetts 
"Electric 
Company 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 

AND GROUNDS 

January 31, 1964, 11:00 a.m., President's Office, South College 



PRESENT : Trustee Haigis, President Lederle, 
Trustees Brown, Schuck, Treasurer 
Johnson, Acting Secretary Redfern, 
Mr. Hugill, Director of Physical 
Plant, and representatives of the 
Western Massachusetts Electric 
Company: Howard Cadwell, Kenneth 
Cuddeback, James Smith, Robert 
Barry and Hardy Prentice from 
General Electric Company 

The Chairman opened the meeting by asking Mr. Cadwell, 
President of Western Massachusetts Electric Company to discuss the 
company's proposal as to electric heating possibilities for Uni- 
versity facilities. Mr. Cadwell stated that with the rapid growth 
of the University, the Company had reviewed its policy on services 
to the University to see if such services and rates could be ex- 
panded and improved. The rate proposal which the company is will- 
ing to make is separate from the proposal which includes electric 
heating, although if heating were included, other types of potential 
economies for the University could be provided; for example, the 
Company would provide underground conduit and cable and a second 
sub-station that would make it unnecessary for the University to 
engage in additional capital outlays for certain utility purposes. 
He emphasized that the premise of the Company's proposal was that 
the Company would supply light, heat and power needs beyond the 
present capacity of the University steam plant system. 

Briefly, the proposal would envisage a rate at a monthly 
minimum of $13,500 that would include the first 750,000 KW hours. 
This would include in addition a day rate of 1.5 cents M hours 
above the 750,000 KW minimum and a night rate (from 10:00 p.m. 
until 8:00 a.m.) of 0.7 cents per KW hour. Their engineers esti- 
mate this would give the University an average electric heat rate 
of 1,2 cents per KW hour. Mr. Cadwell added that it was his 
personal opinion the rate would actually come closer to 1.1 cents 
per KW hour particularly if hot water storage were possible that 
would allow heating of water at the 0.7 cent night rate. 

Mr. Smith pointed out the Company now serves the Uni- 
versity with two lines to the campus. If the Southwest complex were 
served by the Company, Western Massachusetts would extend the 
necessary cables to the buildings, with plans to complete a campus 
loop underground in future years. About 1966, the Company would 
build a sub-station near the Tillson Farm with a capacity of 
100,000 KVA. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Cadwell said the Company would be willing to 
furnish 13 KVA service to (and including transformers within) 
buildings with the University responsibility that of handling low 
voltage branches for an optional annual $2.50 per KVA rating of 
transformers. He pointed out the rate of growth in electric heat- 
ing in western Massachusetts which has grown from 100 yearly in- 
stallations in 1957 to 800 annual installations in 1963, or a 
total of 2,278 dwellings with electric heating in 1963. Over 350 
installations of commercial heating have been made by the Company. 
Mr. Cadwell cited the general advantages of electric heating and 
the special advantages of this form of heat to the University, 
such as elimination of need for new boiler plant facilities. He 
noted that the proposed rates as well as existing rates are always 
subject to the decisions and determinations of the Massachusetts 
State Public Utilities Commission, which could order changes in 
rates to avoid "discriminatory rates among customers of utilities", 
even though the Western Massachusetts Company would be willing, 
within this reservation, to give a ten-year guaranteed rate. 

Mr. Hugill stated that Stone & Webster, consultants, 
could have a preliminary report on comparative costs within a week 
or so after the bids had been received on the high-rise dormitories 
and in time for consideration before awarding bids. The Chairman, 
thanked the utility representatives for their illuminating pre- 
sentation and accepted kits of materials which the Company had 
prepared for the information of the committee and other Trustees. 

Item 9 on the agenda was taken up and there was extended 
discussion of the need for a policy framework for the Trustees in 
the naming of buildings at the University. The committee suggested 
that the University Office of Institutional Studies check on 
whether or not other institutions have set policies in this regard. 

Item 2 of the agenda was taken under consideration and 
the President mentioned his fruitful discussions with the Chairman 
of the Building Authority and stated that procedures for liaison 
and exchange of information had been clarified, including a firm 
invitation to the President to attend Building Authority meetings 
and to receive minutes of the meetings and thus be in a position 
of constructively keeping the Board of Trustees informed as to 
matters warranting Trustee consideration. The President said he 
was convinced beyond any doubt that a spirit of mutual cooperation 
and assistance exists among all parties concerned with this im- 
portant phase of University development. The Buildings and Grounds 
Committee felt this approach would be an eminently suitable 
arrangement . 

The Chairman then moved to item 3 on the agenda and at 
the request of the Chairman, the Treasurer distributed copies of a 
formal request that should be made by the Board to the Building 
Authority to initiate the second group phase of the Southwest com- 
plex (2 dormitories and a dining hall facility) . The Treasurer 



2501 



Naming of 
Buildings 



U of M 

Building 

Authority 



Southwest 
Quadrangle 

2nd phase 



2 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

noted that the second group phase of the project would be on a 
tight schedule and the Trustees should be prepared to act with 
all prudent dispatch. The Chairman asked when the Trustees ought 
to be prepared to consider the third group phase of this project 
and the Treasurer stated this would not be required for approximate]^ 
a year and that this would still allow adequate lead time. Trustee 
Schuck agreed to find out what the Building Authority would con- 
sider most useful in regard to a desirable timetable for the third 
group phase of the Southwest project. After general discussion, it 
was moved, seconded and 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 



Whereas The Authority is authorized by 
Chapter 773, as amended by Chapter 684., 
Acts of 1963, of the Acts of I960, among 
other things, to construct, equip and 
furnish dormitories, dining commons and 
other buildings and structure? for the 
use of the University, its students and 
other persons, organizations and associa- 
tions referred to in Section 3 of said 
Chapter 773, as amended, upon written re- 
quest made by authority of the Trustees; 
Nov/, Therefore 

Be It Resolved That John W. Lederle, presi- 
dent of the University, be and he hereby 
is authorized in the name and on behalf of 
the Trustees to make a written request of 
the Authority that the Authority plan, con- 
struct, equip and furnish buildings to 
house approximately 800 students to be 
ready for occupancy not later than September 
1, 1966, buildings to house approximately 
900 students to be ready for occupancy not 
later than September 1, 1967, and buildings 
to provide dining facilities for approximately 
850 persons in seats at one time to be ready 
for use not later than September 1, 1967, 
each of said buildings to be for the use of 
the University, its students and other per- 
sons, organizations and associations referred 
to in Section 3 of said Chapter 773, as 
amended, and to repair, maintain and operate 
said buildings and to construct, install, 
maintain and repair approaches thereto, drive- 
ways, walkways, parking areas and other inci- 
dental facilities, and to do planting and 
landscaping, necessary or appropriate in the 
determination of the Authority, as approved 
in writing by the president or by such other 
officer or officers of the University or of 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



the Trustees as may hereafter he authorized 
hy the Trustees or by the Executive Committee 
thereof so to act, for said building or 
buildings. These buildings are to be located 
in the southwest dormitory area as shown on 
the Master Plan developed by Sasaki, Walker 
& Associates and the studies for the complex 
as developed by Hugh Stubbins & Associates. 
Site planning shall be coordinated with 
Sasaki, Walker & Associates and design shall 
be coordinated with Pietro Belluschi. 

The Chairman brought item 4, the Stadium site, before 
the meeting. The Treasurer noted the extreme difficulties in 
properly coordinating the timetable between the Building Authority 
Stadium project and the state authorized site development work for 
this area of the campus. This includes laying down of the foot- 
ball field proper. Sasaki, Walker & Associates have been pro- 
viding some of this coordination. The state has wanted Gordon 
Ainsworth & Associates to be able to complete his portion of the 
program on the site development which, naturally, is itself con- 
tingent on the developments of plans for the Stadium structure. 
It is the present hope that work on the Stadium structure would be 
able to commence August 1964, But before Paul Weidlinger, the 
structural engineer, can start operations, the site itself must be 
cleared, drained and provided with working approach roads. 

The Treasurer distributed a tentative work schedule that 
provided a suggested timetable for coordination of the site 
preparation phase of the total project (Document A) . Daily ex- 
pediting will be required to achieve such a tight schedule. 
Sasaki, Walker & Associates have offered to coordinate the site 
development phase with the structure phase of the project. A 
letter just received from Sasaki, Walker & Associates points out 
(with the aid of supplemental drawings) certain desired changes in 
the preliminary site plan, including the desirability of some 
movement of the practice fields to the north, enlargement of the 
"pad" on which this Stadium structure will rest, movement of the 
Statium to the south and west, and relocation of drain channels 
and approach road from the east side of the Stadium, 

There was extended discussion on the point that it is 
important to keep the total project moving forward in a satis- 
factory fashion and to the effect that no changes should be made 
without full information and approval by all those concerned with 
the total project. Subsequently, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the preliminary site plans submitted 

by Gordon Ainsworth & Associates are condi- 
tionally approved, subject to necessary 
modifications and to Board approval, with 
the provision that the modifications by 
Sasaki, Walker & Associates will be subject 
to the approval of Gordon Bunshaft, Paul 
Weidlinger, and Gordon Ainsworth. 



2503 



stadium 
site 



2504 



COMMITTEE 



Poultry 
Plant - 
Preliminary 
Plans 



Rental 
Rates 



French 
Property 



Holmes 
Property 



Belchertown 
Horticultural 
Research 
Center 

Rewa 
Property 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Chairman brought item 5, preliminary plans for the 
Poultry Plant Buildings, before the committee. At his request, the 
Treasurer exhibited sketches and drawing of the proposed Poultry 
Plant facilities. He noted that the project would cost approxi- 
mately $350,000 and that this would be equivalent to a unit cost of 
about $10 per square foot. After general discussion, it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED: To recommend that the Board approve the 
preliminary plans for the Poultry Plant 
Buildings. 

As to the establishment of rental fees in University 
housing units other than dormitories, the Treasurer reported, at 
the request of the Chairman, that his staff is still engaged in 
this study and hopes to report a formula in the not too distant 
future. However, the Treasurer added, there were certain pressing 
situations which ought to receive immediate action pending the 
establishment of a formal system of rental fees. One of these was 
the French House, so-called, which prior to acquisition by the 
University had a rental of $45 per month without utilities for the 
first floor apartment. After general discussion, it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : That the committee recommend the Board 

approve a rental of the French House, so- 
called, of $45.00 per month without utili- 
ties for the first floor apartment, 
retroactive to the date of University 
acquisition, and subject to subsequent 
adoption by the Board of a standard 
rental formula. 

The Treasurer called to the attention of the committee a 
similar situation in regard to the Holmes house, so-called. After 
general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the committee recommend the Board 

approve a rental of $110 per month without 
utilities for the Holmes house, so-called, 
subject to subsequent adoption by the 
Board of a standard rental formula. 

The committee briefly considered and held over for furthei 
study the matter of rentals in regard to the Belchertown Horti- 
cultural Research Center and the Rewa. House in South Deerfield, as 
well as the matter of equalizing apartment rentals for house- 
mothers on campus. Although no action ?/as taken upon the latter 
matter, the consensus of the committee was to prefer, as a matter 
of principle, to hold the rentals at the present rates. 



/?&cccateiit A 



MASS,. STATE PROJECT 1160- 2 CONTRACT #2 
REPLACEMENT OF MAIN PHYSICAL EDUCATION FIELD 



The following ie a schedule on placing the above work und»r 
Contract which ia ^QtaibU If no delays develop. A realistic cat but* 
would allow four weeks slippage In this ee.hadwie uo to contract ©ward 
dates 



Jan 



17/64 



Jan. 27/64 
Jan. 31/64 
Feb. 

Feb, 
Feb. 28 
March 6 
March 15 
March 27/64 
April 17/64 
May 1/64 
May 15/64 
May 25/64 
25/64 



7/64 
21/64 
/64 
/64 

3 64 



Architect completed preliminary plans and delivered 

fchess to B.B.C 

Preliminary plana received for review by U, of M» 

Prelijainary pla roved end returned to B„B„C 

B„B»Cc returns Preliminary plans to architect . ::.*oved, 

Archc. complete* f plans and returns them tc B.B.C. 

Uo of M, recej.: Lnal plans froa B.B.C, 

U. of M approves final plan© and returns the© to B.,B.C s 

B*B Co approves final plana . 

B„B,C, advertise© contract (3 weeks) 

B«BcC, opens bldSc 

BoB C«, awards contract . 

B„B„C,. issues notice to proceed. 

Contractor starts work 5 

Stadium area of contract is usable „ 



I 



1/27/64 



\ 











2505 




UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 




1 




The Chairman stated there was no business in connection 




1. 




with land acquisition matters at this time. 




COMMITTEE 


Prior to inspecting the Frank L. Boyden building, the 
committee took up under item 10, the following subjects: 






A. The Treasurer stated that preliminary plans 


Administration 




were ready for the Administration Building 


Building - 




and that the architects were preparing a 


Preliminary 




model of the structure. Dean Belluschi 


Plans 




would review the plans. It was agreed that 






a meeting of the Buildings and Grounds 






Committee should be held on February 11 






prior to the full Board meeting and that 






this item, preliminary plans for the 






Administration Building, be placed as 






#1 item at the Board meeting. 






B. The committee was informed that the Pare sky 


Pare sky 




property was still unresolved. The 


Property 




committee was of the firm opinion that in- 






asmuch as the property had been taken under 






appropriate procedures, including the re- 




| 


ceipt of three qualified appraisals, no 
further appraisals would be necessary. 




J 


The committee then moved to the Frank L. Boyden Building 


Frank L. 




and were conducted on a tour of the facilities by the Dean of the 


Boyden 




School of Physical Education, Warren McGuirk. At the conclusion 


Building 




of the inspection, the committee moved, seconded and 






VOTED: To recommend that the Board approve . 






subject to the contractors fulfilling 






the "punch list", the acceptance of 






the new Physical Education Building 






as the Frank L. Boyden Building, 






The meeting T/as adjourned at 4:3# p.m. 






0^^ 


— " /i/) 






ifeo F. Redfern 




J 


Acting Secretary 





■»c 



COMMITTEE 



Administration 
Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND 

GROUNDS 

February 11, 1964, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Trustees Haigis, Brown, -chuck 
(who arrive^ at 12:10 from a 
meeting of the Building Authority), 
Treasurer Johnson, Acting Secretary 
Redfern and representatives from 
the firm of Campbell and Aldrich: 
Larry Nulty, Ralph Harris and Axel 
Kaufmann. 

^ 1 _ The Chairman opened the meeting by stating that the onlv 
item on the agenda was the preliminary design plans for the lo 
spective Philip F. Whitmore Administration luildi^.^e Usurer 
introduced the representatives from Campbell 8, AMch I Ua 
noted that Dean Belluschi and Sasa *!*er & Associates h.Irtily 
approve the new Administration Building da i as shovm by thf 
scale model presented at the meeting. Mr. Nulty distributed a 
brochure of the design plans which include i e inflation floor 
layout,, sectional drawings, and utility blueprint" He pointed out 
the ramp leading to the second level which is a student entrance 
to provide easy access to those offices visited frequently by stu- 
dents Attention was called to the first (ground) floor that con! 
tains heavy material and large volume service functions, such as 
computers. The offices in the inner part of the building wUl be 
open to a courtyard to provide improved lighting and a sense of 
openness. The basic exterior is of concrete that will contain a 
warm^tan-color tone similar to the new Earth Science building at 

•h + v P ere Was general discussion as to site and appearance 

WvTTE ° f /!f iCh haVe been aPpr ° Ved * *«* BeUusch? and ' 
nro^H ^ eP + & As ? oc j ates - The Treasurer pointed out that the 
proposed structure included, within budgetary allowances, the ex- 
pressed needs of future users. The earthen bank surrounding th* 
building will be approximately seven feet and could be covered with 
ground cover rather than grass to avoid maintenance prob^ml? 

+h* ™~-n packing a quorum, no vote was taken by the committee on 
the preliminary plans. 

at 12-35 ^ ere belng n ° further busine ss, the meeting adjourned 





Leo F. Redfern 
Acting Secretary 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
February 11, 1964, 12:20 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: Trustee Boyden, President lederle, 
Trustees Healey, Crowley, Pumphret, 
Acting Secretary Redfern 



A quorum "being present, the Chairman called the meeting 
to order and upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the 

purpose of discussing honorary degrees. 

Upon leaving executive session, there being no further 
business, the meeting was adjourned at 12:45 p.m. 




f. (Jjf^o^ 



Leo F. Redfern 
Acting Secretary 



2507 



2508 



COMMITTEE 



Undergraduate 
Curriculum 



Ph.D. in 
Chemical 
Engineering 



Status of 
Labor 
Relations 
Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AM) PROGRAM OF STUDY 

February 28, 1964, 2:15 p.m., President's Office 



PRESENT : Trustee Schuck, President Lederle, 
Trustees Crowley, Plimpton, Acting 
Secretary Redfern, Dr. Venman 

A quorum being present, the Chairman called the meeting 
to order at 2:15 p.m. 

At the request of the President, Dr. Venman described the 
procedures for initiating, reviewing, and recommending undergraduate 
course changes to the Committee on Faculty and Program of Study. 
In connection with the proposed courses in Forestry, there was 
discussion on the leading role which the University plays in the 
area of wood utilization and plywood development. It was pointed 
out that some of the foremost experts in this area of wood 
utilization are on the University staff. Dr. Venman also pointed 
out that the proposed Sociology 55 course was an undergraduate 
counterpart of an existing graduate course in Sociology. After 
general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the committee recommend to the Board 
approval of the changes in the under- 
graduate curriculum as set forth in 
Document 64-051. 

The proposal for a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering was 
taken up and the President noted the strength of the department's 
staff which has substantial research orientation and, an 
especially encouraging sign, a relatively youthful average age. 
After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board approve the 

Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering recommended 
in Document 64-052. 

The President explained the background of George Meany's 
speech at the University Centennial Convocation in which he ex- 
pressed the need for greater activities on the part of educational 
institutions in the field of Labor Relations and Labor Research. 
The President stated that he had received a letter from Mr. William 
Belanger, President of the Massachusetts State Labor Council 
AFL-CIO, requesting that the University explore possible areas of 
service in this field. The President appointed a committee to 
study the feasibility of this proposal; said committee composed of 
Assistant Dean Conlon (School of Business Administration), Professor 
Bruce Morris (Acting Head, Economics), Professor J. Henry Korson 
(Head, Department of Sociology), and Dr. Leo F. Redfern (Acting 
Secretary), Chairman. 



t 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



At the request of the President, Dr. Redfern described 
the work of the University committee which proposed, in a pre- 
liminary fashion, a Labor Relations and Research Program in four 
major dimensions: (1) organization of existing undergraduate 
courses in such fashion as to allow for a "concentration" by stu- 
dents majoring in relevant disciplines at the University, but de- 
siring a concentrated field of study in Labor Relations to supple- 
ment their major field; (2) a tentative proposal of a master's 
degree program in Labor Relations based largely on an inter- 
disciplinary approach, supplemented by establishment of a se- 
lective number of new courses required to provide a balanced pro- 
gram in depth, and operating under a Director of Labor Relations 
Education and the Graduate School; (3) an extension service offer- 
ing on-campus and off-campus short courses, institutes and work- 
shops oriented to the needs of labor groups throughout the 
Commonwealth; and (4) an extensive research program, including 
interdisciplinary studies, on problems of labor and labor organiza- 
tion. 



2509 



The University committee met with a committee of the Stat 
AFL-CIO Labor Council that included Mr. Belanger; James Loughlin, 
Secretary- Treasurer; Richard O'Keefe and John Callahan, Executive 
Vice Presidents; Francis Lavigne, Director of the Education De- 
partment of the State Council; and Larry Rogin, Director of Educa- 
tion at the National AFL-CIO Office from Washington. The labor 
representatives were very favorably disposed to the preliminary 
program as presented. They acknowledged that the t?rc» academic 
phases of the total program were solely University responsibilities, 
but were pleased that these were being contemplated. They were 
particularly interested in the extension service program and 
offered many constructive suggestions as to the types of courses 
and institutes which would meet the expressed needs of the labor 
movement. They were especially pleased that the contemplated pro- 
gram would be focused on labor relations and labor research and 
not be involved with industrial relations. The University 
committee had pointed out its feeling that any program in business 
and industrial relations would more properly be under the juris- 
diction of the School of Business Administration or some other unit 
focused particularly upon industrial relations and personnel 
management . 

The President stated that he would be interested in the 
reaction of Board members to this proposal and that comments of 
the Board could provide useful guidelines. For that reason he de- 
sired that there be some Board discussion, even if on an informal 
basis, at the next meeting of the full Board. 

The President called the attention of the committee to 
the fact that the old Standard Practice Instruction manual stated 
that the President shall make faculty appointments below the rank 
of Professor with confirmation by the Board of such appointments. 






Faculty 

Hiring 

Policy 



It/ 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The President mentioned that it is now necessary to operate very 
quickly in making offers and firming up commitments to obtain the 
best possible candidates for our rather large staffing requirements. 
It would be most desirable, under such demanding circumstances, if 
the President had the opportunity to offer firm appointments sub- 
ject to confirmation by the Board. Under such a procedure the 
President emphasized that tenure appointments would always be for- 
warded to the Board prior to final commitment. However, for 
attracting candidates for faculty positions up through Department 
Head, the President would be greatly aided if he had the authority 
to engage subject to Board confirmation. He pointed out that his 
Deans were also under heavy pressure in this same regard and that 
should he, the President, be authorized to make these firm commit- 
ments a policy would be set up whereby a portion of such authority 
could be delegated to the Deans to make firm commitments at the 
lower ranks in order to resolve some of the critical situations that 
are presently causing a "bind" in personnel recruitment procedures. 

The President further noted that recruiting is one of the 
toughest problems the University currently faces. In academic life 
today apparently the instructor rank is in danger of disappearing, 
especially for Ph.D. trained candidates/ In today's academic 
market, one usually finds that available good men have three to 
four alternate offers pending and there is a pressing need for 
being able to make firm offers in order to prevail against this 
type of competition. He added that another complicating factor, one 
the University hopes to meet at least in modest measure, is that 
faculty engaged in research frequently require special equipment or 
facilities, in addition to going salary rates, as inducements to 
come to the University. The Trustees present agreed that the 
President should confer with University legal counsel and procure 
a draft of a by-law authorizing engagement of academic personnel, 
subject to Trustee confirmation, through the rank of Head of De- 
partment . 



ment) 



(Trustee Plimpton left at 3:34 P.m. for a prior commit- 



There was considerable discussion of the adequacy of the 
presentation of personnel action data. The President stated that 
the Secretary to the Board should explore some method of setting up 
a system of studying and analyzing faculty turn-over including per- 
haps a procedure for exit interviews. It also was noted that there 
is a need for an annual review of departmental and school staffing 
patterns, including analysis of types and levels of new appoint- 
ments, promotions, resignations, and related information. It was 
felt that some system providing for a post-audit review by the 
Faculty and Program of Study Committee (and by the Board as a whole 
if desired) would be one feasible answer to buttress a delegation 
of authority to the President to make firm commitments and appoint- 
ments to the staff. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Chairman noted that a similar type of problem exists 
in regard to Trustee evaluation of curriculum and that there is an 
apparent need for an audit program of courses of study or for a 
general assessment in evaluating proposals for curriculum changes. 
Such information might deal with workloads, student demand levels, 
budgetary implications, and place of proposed changes in the total 
curriculum of the University. It was agreed that a desirable first 
step might be to have the Assistant to the Provost distribute to 
the Faculty and Program of Study Committee materials submitted in 
support of new course proposals. 

The President distributed copies of a preliminary draft 
of a policy for tenure. The President stated this proposal is now 
being considered by the Faculty Senate and as soon as the Senate 
has recommended and advised on the policy, he will submit a pro- 
posal on this matter to the Trustees. 

The Chairman asked if any plans were being developed for 
long-range academic program planning. The President stated that 
the problem is to better synthesize our capital outlay plans with 
the academic planning going on among the "line" units (departments, 
schools and University). This type of planning would be a 
coordinative function, in which the Provost would play a major 
role, but to which a full-time person might have to be assigned in 
order to gather and sift the material and to present it in a form 
suitable for decisions by appropriate University officials. 

Dr. William Field, Dean of Students, was introduced to 
the committee. Dean Field explained the status of the residential 
college concept. He noted that the problem involved one of 
optimizing faculty-student relations in view of the dynamic growth 
of the University community. This rapid growth has given rise to 
problems of student isolation in a relatively large institution 
and has led to the consideration of an idea of establishing sub- 
units within the University based upon residence halls. Such 
units by having selected faculty members living in (at the halls) 
would promote better student-faculty rapport, would provide a 
sense of relatedness to an easily identifiable unit within the 
University, and would include social, cultural and educational in- 
fluences. A committee has been appointed by the President to de- 
velop an initial proposal that would implement this basic concept. 

The committee had agreed that a program might be de- 
veloped on campus in stages, commencing with new units in the 
dormitories now under construction on the Hill at the eastern side 
of the campus. A senior faculty person would reside as head of 
residence in such units and a younger faculty couple would be se- 
lected to serve as assistant head of residence. This staff would 
recruit non-resident faculty members to affiliate with a living 
unit and to participate from time to time in social and cultural 
programs of these units. The Dean estimated that the total ad- 
ministrative cost of such a program for the four residence halls 
that might be engaged in the first phase of the program would only 



2511 



Report on 
Residential 
College 
Idea 



2512 



COMMITTEE 



Report by 
Dean of 
Admissions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

be approximately $8,000 to $10,000 above the regular staffing ex- 
penses required in operating the dormitories on the old basis. 

Dean Field stated that there was a possibility that some 
sections of courses might even meet in the hall lounges and 
utilize these facilities for instructional purposes. A committee 
would be established to review continuously the development and re- 
sults of this program. It was estimated that about 1300 students 
would be involved in the first stage. 

The Chairman noted that the vitality of the faculty se- 
lected in the first stage was an important consideration and that 
proper selection would be more crucial than the numbers involved 
initially. It was also felt that a judicious development and 
stimulation of cultural activities is a critical factor in the 
success of such a residential college approach. 

Dean Field stated that a University committee has worked 
closely with the Building Authority Committee and their consultants 
in the development, design and decor of the new units on the Hill 
and that substantial progress has been made in this respect. 

The Chairman thanked Dean Field for the informative re- 
port and requested that Dean Tunis come into the meeting for the 
purpose of discussing admissions policies. 

Dean Tunis informed the committee that the University is 
scheduled to take in 2600 freshmen for the fall of 1964, consisting 
of 1250 women and 1350 men. Next year the plan is to aim for a 
50-50 ratio between men and women for the entering class. 
Originally the Admissions Office had planned to offer acceptances 
to 4900 applicants with a view to filling the 2600 available places, 
but the rate of acceptances had been running sufficiently high that 
it will not be possible to offer acceptances to this many candi- 
dates. Applications, said the Dean, are now over 10,000, not in- 
cluding the bulk of the transfer applications which are scheduled 
to come in later in the spring. The Dean distributed a table which 
is attached to these minutes providing Admission Office statistics 
as of February 13, 1964. 

In order to aid students to make plans as far in advance 
as possible, the Dean stated that the Admissions Office had already 
sent out 500 declinations to those who would obviously not be 
qualified for acceptance next fall at the University. He exhibited 
to the committee a data processing run-off having 17,000 referred 
records which are being processed by Admissions. 

One bright ray in the admissions picture at the moment, 
said theDean, is that scholarship money is now available in 
reasonable amounts so that for the first time the University can 
approach its goal of offering some degree of assistance to all 
needy, qualified freshmen. For this coming fall, the Dean stated 
that about $96,000 would be available for freshman scholarship 



COMMITTEE 



2513 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



assistance and that these awards would be made on a basis of the 
College Scholarship Service computations of need plus scholastic 
standing of the candidates. He noted that the average award to 
freshman women is $375. 

The President mentioned the University's plan to develop 
a program for culturally bereft youngsters by seeking out suitable 
prospects at the junior grade level of high school and trying to 
stimulate in these students a motivation for higher education in- 
cluding the bringing of them to the campus for a summer and then 
follow-up contacts during the senior year in high school to 
encourage them to aspire toward and achieve a record to warrant 
college-level training. Another proposed program, said the Presi- 
dent, would involve an attempt to attract students from minority 
groups, especially from the Negro community, to enter the Uni- 
versity with particular encouragement to enter certain fields of 
study which have hitherto been neglected by such groups, such as 
Business Administration training. 

Dean Tunis added in regard to student needs that wherever 
possible the University attempts to meet these needs by a combina- 
tion of scholarship grants and loans. In response to a question 
from the Chairman, the Dean stated that the University has a 
faculty Scholarship Committee that is organized into sub-committees 
which focus on specific areas for scholarship awards (e.g., 
freshmen, professional schools, etc.). The Scholarship Committee 
develops policies and guidelines that enable the Admissions Office 
and the Office of Student Placement and Financial Aid to carry out 
the administrative procedures. He also noted that the Board of 
Admissions and Records sets the policies on admission standards. 

The Chairman requested Dr. Venman to compile at a sub- 
sequent date a report on the committees of the University and the 
University Senate, and their duties. Dean Tunis promised to pro- 
vide the committee with data on College Entrance Board scores and 
other relevant information as contained in the Registrar's annual 
report. 

In regard to transfer students, the Dean pointed out 
that applications tend to peak the first week in March and that 
the Admissions Office will be deciding the bulk of these cases in 
May and June. These applications are handled primarily by 
Mr. Cadigan who has had experience in the Community College, system. 
Particular attention will be paid to the Community College problem 
of successfully transferring students to the University and that 
to accomplish this, Mr. Cadigan will be visiting every Community 
College in the Commonwealth and interviewing as many interested 
candidates as possible during this tour. This year, the Dean 
added, they are allowing 300 transfer places in the entering group. 
He stated that there are some articulation problems in handling 
transfer students but that these are worked out in conferences 
with the Community Colleges. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



In response to a question, the President stated that it 
is the aim of the University to accept up to % of exceptionally 
we 11- qualified out-of-state candidates as authorized by vote of 
the Board of Trustees. Dean Tunis mentioned that a number of these 
out-of-state candidates include children of alumni and that in 
addition, there is no general scholarship aid available for out-of- 
state students at the University. The Chairman thanked Dean Tunis 
for an excellent presentation and discussion. She expressed the 
desire that at future meetings, the committee might occasionally 
hold luncheon meetings with faculty members to provide for informal 
discussion and exchange of views. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 5:36 p.m. 




Leo F. fteorern 
Acting Secretary 



i 



Asmssizm office aramcs ~ FEBRaam: 13. i<x* 



JKGLt 

Women 



* Last year's (2/13/63) applications totaled 5797 
Incx-ease in applications over last ysar « 48 a S# 





JtafrftCsfitffiJS 


3S&& 


4014 


441 


4455 


7404 


1224 


8628 



Una 667 56 723 

Wowm -&S2 132 2UQ 

1616 227 1843 



* last yearns (2/13/63) acceptances totaled 2&|£ 



- 17,600 (includes applications, interviews, 
College Boards) . 



I 






COMMITTEE 



«0 ID 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMfflTTEE 
March 11, 1964, 12:00 M., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Trustee Boyden, President Lederle, 
Trustees Crowley, Pumphret, Fox, 
Treasurer Johnson, Dr. Venman 



A quorum being present the meeting was called to order 
at 12:15 p.m. by Chairman Boyden. 

After discussion on the course of development of the 
Medical School, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the Executive Committee recommends 
to the Board of Trustees that the ad hoc 
Screening Committee originally charged 
with finding a Dean for the Medical School 
serve as an^d hoc Committee of the Board 
of Trustees on the Medical School. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:45 p.m. 




QfiiA- 



mti», 



William C. Venman 

Acting Secretary, pro tem 



I 



Attest: Leo F. Redfern 

Acting Secretary 



2516 



COMMITTEE 



Labor 

Education 

Program 



Provost 
Position 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

April 9, 1964, 12 Noon, Dukes Room, Student Union, Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Schuck, President Lederle, 
Trustees Crowley, Haigis, Troy, 
Secretary Redfern, Dr. Venman, 
Professors Conlon, Korson and Morris. 
(Trustee Plimpton arrived at 2:06 p.m.) 

A quorum being present, the Chairman called the meeting 
to order at 12:12 p.m. 

At the request of the Chairman, the President introduced 
the faculty members of the ad hoc Committee on Labor Education: 
Professors Conlon, Korson and Morris. There was considerable 
discussion of the Labor Education Committee's proposal for the 
establishment of a program of labor studies and education at the 
University. Special attention was focused upon the labor program 
approach as compared to the labor-management joint approach. It was 
pointed out that while some institutions use one approach, and others 
utilize the other, testimony from labor leaders shows a strong 
preference for a separate program for labor. The Labor Education 
Committee members were unanimous in recommending the separate pro- 
gram approach and indicated that it was unlikely that organized 
labor would be willing to provide support in gaining legislative 
authorization and appropriations for a joint program. It was 
further noted that the School of Business is planning an extensive 
program for business and industry, including executive development 
training programs and the School of Engineering has proposed an 
Engineering Liaison Service to assist business firms. In view of 
these plans by other units of the University, it was felt that the 
joint approach in labor programs would have little advantage and 
considerable disadvantage compared to the separate labor program. 

The Chairman expressed appreciation to the faculty 
committee members for their contribution in clarifying the issues 
and recommendations. After further discussion, it was moved, 
seconded and 



VOTED: 



\ 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the program for labor educa- 
tion as contained in the Report of the 
ad hoc Committee on Labor Education. 



The President introduced the candidate for the position of 
Provost, Dr. Osv/ald Tippo. (Trustee Plimpton arrived at the meeting! 
At the request of the Chairman, Dr. Tippo discussed some of the 
major objectives and principles which he felt important in the 
growth and development of a state university dedicated to the 
standard of excellence in research, teaching and public service. 



! 



COMMITTEE 



2517 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Chairman thanked Dr. Tippo for his joining the committee for 
this discussion. 

(Mr. Broadhurst was invited into the meeting) 

The Chairman then moved to the agenda item concerning the 
proposed policy on academic freedom and tenure. The President ex- 
plained that he was recommending this policy which had been care- 
fully developed and discussed by a special faculty committee, 
approved by the Faculty Senate, and reviewed by legal counsel. 
Basically, said the President, the proposed policy follows the 
principles and procedures recommended by the Association of 
American University Professors. 

Mr. Broadhurst called attention to the fact that under 
the proposal, tenure possibilities for non-academic professional st&ff 
would be confined to the positions of Staff Assistant, Staff 
Associate, Staff Administrator and Staff Physician. Tenure would 
not be granted to non-academic professional members except in these 
categories and only by vote of the Trustees. Likewise, tenure for 
academic personnel would not be automatic, but granted only by 
vote of the Board. Under the proposal, a faculty member eligible 
for tenure must take the initiative to insure that his case is re- 
ceiving consideration. This provision will avoid any member 
"backing-in M to tenure through inadvertency. To qualify for 
tenure, a candidate must have six years of experience at an 
accredited institution, three of which must be with the University 
of Massachusetts. For special cases, the President may recommend 
tenure within a shorter period of time. He noted the importance 
to a university of having reasonably specific policy and rules on 
tenure. Procedures are provided for an orderly system of review 
and appeal, with ultimate authority to decide issues in dispute 
residing in the Board of Trustees. All rules and procedures con- 
form to Trustee statutory powers and authority. 

The President expressed the opinion that the proposed 
policy was one of the best of which he has knowledge, and that its 
adoption by the Trustees would constitute a major improvement in 
University personnel policies. 



Tenure 
Policy 



3:05 p.m.) 



(Trustee Haigis departed for prior appointment at 



After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of that portion of the Resolu- 
tion on Academic Freedom and the Policy 
on Tenure Rules and Regulations, as con- 
tained in Document 64.-O6I, that pertains 
to academic personnel. l 






2518 



COMMITTEE 



Appointment 
Policy 



Undergraduate 
Curriculum 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was thereupon moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; That further study be undertaken of 

employment conditions for non-academic 
professional staff with a view toward 
an early report to the committee for 
purpose of additional consideration. 

The President reviewed once more the difficulties in re- 
cruiting without the flexibility of being able to make firm offers 
to qualified faculty candidates for vacant positions on the Uni- 
versity staff. The policy being recommended, which had been re- 
viewed by legal counsel, would greatly aid in alleviating much of 
the competitive pressures that are presently restricting our 
ability to successfully recruit new staff members. All appoint- 
ments made under this policy would, of course, be submitted to 
the Trustees for confirmation. 

It was moved, seconded and 

VOTED: To add to positions authorized to be 
filled by appointment of the Presi- 
dent (as contained in Document 64-062) 
the positions of "athletic coaching 
personnel". 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED: To recommend Board approval of the pro- 
posed policy, as amended, on Faculty 
Appointments as contained in Document 
64-062. 

(Mr. Broadhurst left at 3:37 p.m.) 

At the request of the President, Dr. Venman explained the 
objectives of the proposed changes in the undergraduate curriculum. 
He noted that the proposed major in Park Administration was de- 
signed to build a four-year program on the solid base of the present 
two-year program and that this proposal has received the endorse- 
ment of related professional and business groups. The Air Science 
proposal follows the current nation-wide revision underway in AIR 
ROTC programs that will emphasize space problems. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend the Board approve the 

changes in the undergraduate curriculum 
as set forth in Document 64-058. 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The President presented the Graduate Council recommenda- 
tion relative to changes and additions in the Graduate School 
curriculum. The President mentioned especially the public need 
for strengthening our resources in the School of Education and 
stated he was pleased with the proposals from Education that are 
designed to meet these needs with a high-level program, including 
further development of the doctoral program. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board approve the 
curriculum changes and additions in the 
graduate program as contained in 
Document 64-060. 

The Chairman asked for information concerning the pro- 
posal for Graduate and Student Loans. At the request of the Presi- 
dent, Dr. Venman explained that the recommended policy would 
remedy certain hardship cases that occasionally develop because of 
delays experienced by students in receiving payments due them by 
the Federal government and other sources, under grant and fellow- 
ship awards. The proposal would provide for temporary, short-term 
interest free loans to tide these students over until they began 
to receive the moneys due them. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend Board approval of the grant- 
ing of short-term non- interest loans to 
graduate and foreign students and, further, 
that the appropriate officers of the Uni- N 
versity be authorized to transfer $5,000.00 
from the Trust Fund Interest Account to 
establish said loan fund. 

There was discussion of Dean Moore's memorandum relative 
to the Four-College Cooperative Ph.D. to the effect that the Uni- 
versity should hold the same position toward the Four-College de- 
gree as held by the other colleges; namely, the parallel degree 
approach allowing the University to offer its own Ph.D. in any 
field it desires. It was the consensus of the committee that this 
position was reasonable and in consonance with University objective^. 

There was discussion of the Provost's position and the 
recommendation for appointment of Dr. Tippo to that position. 
After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend Board approval of the appoint- 
ment of Dr. Oswald Tippo as Provost of the 
University of Massachusetts. 

There being no further businesnp the-meeting adjourned 

Leo F. Redfern 
Acting Secretary 



2519 



Graduate 
Curriculum 



Student 
Loans 



Four 

College 

Ph.D. 



■ 



Provost 
Position 



.- _... - 



COMMITTEE 



Capital 

Outlay 

Program 



Pare sky 
Property 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS MD GROUNDS 
April 10, 1964, 10:00 a.m., President's Office, U of M 



PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle, 
Trustees Emerson, Schuck, Treasurer 
Johnson, Acting Secretary Redfern 

At the request of the Chairman, the Treasurer discussed 
the proposed capital outlay program. He stated that more than a 
year had been devoted by the Master Planning Council to reviewing 
and updating the recommendations of each School and College in the 
ten-year capital outlay program. The Council is composed of faculty 
and administrators. Copies of the proposed capital outlay program, 
as approved by the President, for fiscal 1965 were distributed. 
Review of the former capital outlay program was necessary because 
of the changing size and nature of the University programs that had 
evolved in recent years. For example, said the Treasurer, the ex- 
pansion of research and graduate programs has necessitated an in- 
creased emphasis on facilities designed to serve such specialized 
purposes . 

The intent of the Master Plan is to implement the academic 
plans that are approved by the Board of Trustees (as said academic 
plans may be recommended by the Faculty and Program of Study 
Committee) . 

The President stated that his hope was to further improve 
the planning procedures by developing suitable organization and 
staff arrangements. It might be necessary, he said, to allot a 
full-time position to work in this area of administration. The 
committee decided to continue its study of Capital Outlay planning 
at its next meeting on May 11. 

The Chairman then moved to item 2 of the agenda, land 
acquisitions. The Chairman noted that Mrs. Ada Paresky had 
property which was taken by eminent domain on June 8, 1962, by the 
University and the structures thereon demolished in accordance with 
the University Master Plan. The property had been bought by 
Mr. and Mrs. Paresky in 1951 for approximately $15,000 with the 
stated idea of eventually starting a business, for which they had 
obtained a town variance. The University had had three independent 
appraisals made and, within the Trustee policy in regard to average 
appraised values, had offered $26,600 for settlement of the property 
Mrs. Paresky, whose husband had subsequently died, had not agreed 
to this amount. Judge Blassberg was thereupon invited into the 
committee meeting to explain further details about the situation. 

Mrs. Paresky and her son David were then invited into the 
meeting. They circulated photos of the building, taken prior to 
demolition. David Paresky described the history of the acquisition 



i 



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2521 



COMMITTEE 



I 



J 



uwym$ l jy^®M* ^ssA^#=fcj#Fffc$£ 



of the property in 1951 and the receipt of a permit to conduct a 
souvenir and gift shop thereon. After the death of the father, 
Mrs. Paresky in 1959 applied for a renewal of the permit. The 
neighboring store proprietor objected and the Zoning Board turned 
doY/n the permit for a clothing and gift shop. In I960 the Pareskys 
applied for a permit to conduct a gift shop solely and upon agree- 
ment with the neighboring proprietor that it be only a clothing 
shop the Pareskys again applied for a permit. The University is 
on record as opposing the granting of the permit at that time. 
The permit was issued in 1961 with inclusion of a statement to the 
effect that the intent to establish a business was sincere and not 
apparent as an attempt to pyramid property values, David Paresky 
pointed out the settlement prices which had been received for 
adjoining lands in that neighborhood and stated that his mother 
and he felt that in view of these the offer of settlement which 
had been made by the University was not adequate. 

The Chairman, explained that the Building and Grounds 
Committee, as a unit of the Board of Trustees, could only advise 
and recommend on this matter and that the Board has full authority 
to act with finality. He assured the Pareskys that their comments 
and opinions would be taken into consideration in the committee's 
recommendation to the Board. He stated that it was the hope of 
all concerned that the matter could be acted upon with all due con- 
sideration and dispatch. 

The Treasurer stated that a new appraisal had recently 
been made of the property and that this had raised the average 
offer possible under the Board formula to $30,000. After further 
discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED; To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
authorize an offer of up to $30,000 for 
the Paresky property. 

After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED; To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they purchase or take by eminent 
domain in fee the property of Isobel A. 
Cobbs containing 22.0996 acres more or 
less situate in Amherst, Hampshire County, 
Massachusetts, and being a portion of the 
premises described in a deed recorded in 
the Hampshire County Registry of Deeds, 
Book 1005, Page 505, and more particularly 
described on a "Plan of land in Amherst, 
Mass., to be taken by the Commonwealth of 
Amherst for the use of the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts, dated February 
14, 1964, Gordon E. Ainsworth & Associates, 
Registered Land Surveyors, Engineers and 
Landscape Architects, Deerfield, Mass."; 
and that the purchase price for the said 
property be $17,930. 



33 I 



: 



Cobbs 
Property 



4j^> 



COMMITTEE 



Ocicki 
Property 



Hillside 
Avenue and 
"Eastman Lane 



Coal 



Road Plans 



UNBVERS1TY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was also moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they purchase or take "by eminent 
domain in fee, the property of Joseph 
S. Ocicki and Shirley M. Ocicki situate 
on Sunset Avenue in Amherst, Hampshire 
County, Massachusetts, and being the 
same premises described in a deed from 
Juzefa Ocicki dated May 2, 1952, and 
recorded in the Hampshire County 
Registry of Deeds, Book 1116, Page 382, 
and also deed from the said Juzefa 
Ocicki dated August A, I960, recorded 
in the Hampshire County Registry of 
Deeds, Book 1332, Page 223 and being 
all of the property owned by the said 
Joseph S. Ocicki and Shirley M. Ociclci 
situate on Sunset Avenue in said 
Amherst; and that the purchase price 
for said property be $12,700. 

The matter of the request to the Tovm of Amherst to 
abandon certain streets was considered. It was moved, seconded 
and 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board authorize 

Judge Samuel Blassberg on behalf of the 
Board to contact the Tovm Manager and 
Town Counsel of the Town of Amherst for 
purpose of arranging for the Tovm to re- 
lease and quitclaim all its rights, 
titles, and interests in Hillside Avenue 
so-called and Eastman Lane so-called to^ 
the Uni- Lty for the purpose of enabling 
the University to develop the campus in 
accordance with the University Master 
Plan. 

There being no further land acquisition matters, Judge 
Blassberg departed. 

In connection with the final plans for the coal-handling 
entailment, the Treasurer stated that these would not go out to bid 
from" the Bureau of Building Construction until a report had been 
received on all potential alternative heating arrangements. The 
committee decided to postpone action at this time pending receipt 
of the report. 

The final plans for the road construction program would 
establish the long-range master plan for an outer Perimeter , for 
vehicle traffic) around the campus and would commence with that 
portion fronting -on the Boyden Building, running north and around 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY QF MASSACHUSETTS 



the section encompassing the Holdsworth Natural Resources Center. 
Sasaki, Walker & Associates had approved the roads but wished that 
sidewalks and tree plantings could be included. However, the 
appropriation authorised for this project would not allow for 
these additional items. After general discussion, it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED: To recommend the Board approve the final 
plans for the road construction as re- 
lated to the first phase of the Master 
Planning traffic and road development 
project. 

There was extended discussion in regard to Goessmann 
Laboratory remodeling project and the Treasurer pointed' out that 
a grant of $150,000 from the National Science Foundation was avail- 
able to match the $350,000 authorized by the State for this 
project. There was some question about an additional $150,000 
that might be available from the State for further renovation but 

ich evidently must be handled as a separate project. The 
Treasurer was instructed to report further on the status of this 
matter. 

The Treasurer stated the necessity for demolishing the 
old brick storage building west of the Curry Hicks Cage. The 
building was no longer suitable for even storage purposes, created 
a traffic impediment, and lay in the path of future classroom site 
development. It was moved, seconded and 

V0TSD: To recommend that the Board approve the 
demolition of the brick storage building 
west of the Curry Hicks Cage. 

There was extended discussion as to whether or not the 
Trustee policy prohibiting the naming of a building after a living 
staff member or a living former staff member of the University 
would app3y to specific facilities within the buildings. It was 
noted that the Alumni had recommended the naming of the new pool 
in the Boyden Building after a living staff person. It was the 
consensus of the committee that this matter should be discussed 
before the Board of Trustees. 

The Treasurer informed the committee that the problem of 
the deflection of the third floor slab in the new section of the 
Morrill Science Center had stabilized and that he was now satisfied 
sufficiently to approve the acceptance of the building, which had 
been authorized by the Board. 



2523 



- 



3:00 p.m. 



There being no further business, the meeting adjourned at 




F. Redfern *' 
Acting Secretary 



Road 

Plans 



Goessmann 
Laboratory 



Demolition 



Other 
Business 



2524 



COMMITTEE 



Furcolo 
Foundation 



Massachusetts 

itime 
Academy 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
April 30, 1964, 10:00 a.m., Parker House, Boston, Mass 



PRESENT : Trustees Fox, Crowley, Pumphret, 
Healey, President Lederle, 
Treasurer Johnson, Dr. Venman 

The first item for discussion was the statement in draft 
form for a proposed gift from the Furcolo Foundation to the 
Trustees of the University. This was followed by a brief discussion 
of the relationship of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy to the 
University. It was also reported t^at the Crime Commission 
activities on campus have apparently begun to subside. 

There was extended discussion of a strong and pressing 
need to extend the operations of the University of Massachusetts 
into the city of Boston. The University could be ready by the fall 
of 1965 to take a freshman class. This operation would emphasize 
high-qua n ity low-cost education and would bring with it the 
benefits of existing accreditation, hi - ^ality faculty and 
library. The operation would be geared to the needs of the stu- 
dents, both undergraduates and continuing education and would offer 
opportunities for education at times denized to meet the needs of 
the students. 

The necessity for coming up with adequate money now, with 
a capital outlay budget later, was discussed. There was extended 
discussion of the problem of timing and sponsorship. It was 
emphasised that this operation would be a complete activity in 
every way paralleling the work on the campus at Amherst and 
eventually offering the same degrees. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:55 a.m. 




William C. Venman 
Gecretary pro tern 



COMMITTEE 



I 



II 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

May 2, 1964, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, U of M, Amherst 



PPESENT: 



Chairman Schuck, President Lederle, 
Trustees Lyons, Plimpton, Troy, 
Acting Secretary Redfern, Dr. Venman, 
Professor Naegele (Director of 
Waltham Field Station) 



The meeting convened at 10:30 a.m. and the Chairman re- 
quested a discussion of the proposal for a Department of Environ- 
mental Science which has been proposed for the Waltham Field 
Station facility. The President asked Professor Naegele to ex- 
plain the background and objectives of the proposal to establish 
a Department of Environmental Science in the College of Agri- 
culture, Professor Naegele spoke briefly on the relationship of 
the Institute of Agricultural and Industrial Microbiology to the 
proposed department, noting that the Institute needed a depart- 
mental structure in order to properly meet the needs of graduate 
students desiring to study in this multi-disciplinary area. This 
would be in line, also, with the nation-wide trend toward re- 
furbishing and reorienting programs and services of schools of 
agriculture toward programs that are academically viable, and pro- 
motive of relevant basic research consonant with contemporary 
trends in the evolution of higher educational services. Professor 
Naegele stated that Rutgers and other institutions have, of course, 
already structured similar Departments of Environmental Science. 
The basic attempt is one of resurrecting the concept of an inter- 
disciplinary community of scholars who can bring diverse talents 
to focus upon a major area of human need. 

It was pointed out that the Institute of Agricultural and 
Industrial Microbiology would become part of the Department of 
Environmental Science. The President indicated this is similar to 
the need to relate bureaus and institutes of the University to the 
relevant resident departments. Professor Naegele explained that 
Environmental Science is related to Ecology which may include cer- 
tain aspects of Microbiology, Botany or Zoology, depending upon 
the academic orientation and in some cases upon the personalities 
of staff workers involved in the programs. The proposed department 
would supplement existing programs and where necessary would pro- 
vide for cooperative relations with existing units of the Uni- 
versity. 

The concept of the tutorial-research program was stressed 
as a new departure in the proposed department. It was noted that 
informational exchange in the field of Environmental Science will 
come primarily through published material, but also through persona 
contact of the faculty with other departments of the University and 
with faculties of institutions of higher education in the Boston 



Department of 
Environmental 
Science 



2526 



COMMITTEE 



Personnel 
Procedures 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

area. The plan would provide, essentially, a "departmental home" 
for the teaching-research-service functions of the Field otation 
staff. The present work of the Field Station and the Institute of 

■icultural and Industrial Microbioln ill continue to he per- 
formed as services within the Department of Environmental S^ie^ce. 

The graduate degree in Environmental Science, which will 
be formally proposed at a later date to the Board, is gaining wider 
acceptance in academic circles. The program would contain, within 
the graduate degree, fields of concentration such as Agror 
Entomology, and Biochemistry. As with all relatively new academic 
departures, it is anticipated that over a period of time there will 
emerge a generally understood concept of the field of Environ- 
mental Science, much as has developed in regard to the field of 
Political Science for example. 

The President stated that the College of Agriculture has 
been thinking and planning for a reorientation of their programs 
and services for some time. Such a reorientation, if encompassed, 
might require a renaming of the College. 

One term that has been proposed is College of Natural Re- 
sources. The President mentioned that there has been, in addition, 
a number of studies on the orientation of Colleges of Agriculture 
including the Hood Study directed by Ayers Brinser v/hich is con- 
cerned with the future of New England agricultural colleges. Such 
studies include possibilities of consolidating certain specialized 
fields on a regional basis. 

(Dr. Naegele left for an appointment at 11:30 a.m.) 

The committee decided to take up at a future meeting the 
proposal for the establishment of a Department of Environmental 
Science. 

The Chairman then raised for discussion the agenda ite 
concerning policy on personnel procedures. The President presented 
a draft policy statement and commented that it was the intent of 
the proposal to clarify the basic policy governing personnel actions 
He said he did not expect action but merely wanted discussion at 
this time. The proposal would emphasize the advisory nature of the 
committees and the relationship of these committees to department 
heads and deans. The proposal would make explicit the provision 
for a review, if desired, at the conclusion of the complete process 
of personnel actions. It was also the intent to stress that the 
role of the committees would be consultative, not recommendatory, 
in order to keep clear the lines of communication and responsibility 
in the University administrative structure. 

There was general discussion and comments and Document 
64-O63 will be revised on the basis of the suggestions made by the 
committee. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



2527 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The development of Assistant Deans in the College of Arts 
and Sciences was taken up. The President, at the request of the 
Chairman, explained that there was considerable need for such 
positions in a large college such as that of Arts and Sciences. 
The intent would be to provide an academic administrative ex- 
perience to selected faculty members for a limited period of time 
(approximately four years). It is anticipated that under the pro- 
posal the faculty members serving as Assistant Dean would return 
to full-time faculty work at the termination of their period of 
service as Assistant Dean. The President stated that this matter 
would officially come before the Board as part of the University's 
budget plan. 

The President also noted the problem that with the 
authorized salary ranges, it is not possible to make we 11- qualified 
full professors serve as Assistant Deans, because the current 
ceiling on the Assistant Dean salary range is not sufficient to 
make adequate provision for such appointments. There is need to 
modify the range for Assistant Deans to a $15,288 maximum in order 
to solve this present dilemma. After general discussion, it was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board approve the 
range of $8,795 to $15,288 for the 
position of Assistant Dean, U of M. 

There was considerable discussion of the value and need 
for another "Morthfield Seminar" to enable Board members to give 
intensive attention to long- range plans, issues, and problems of 
the University of Massachusetts. It was felt by the committee 
that if plans could be undertaken this spring to arrange for such 
a meeting in the fall that a comprehensive program for a Trustee 
seminar could be established and appropriate arrangements made to 
allow maximum participation by the Board. 

The Chairman then called for discussion on the curriculum 
proposals in the agenda. Dr. Venman explained the details of the 
proposed changes, including the alphabetical classification of cer- 
tain courses (C-Humanities; D-Social Sciences; and E-Mathematics 
and Physical Sciences). After general discussion, it -was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED; To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
approve the curriculum changes as con- 
tained in Document 64-066 which is 
attached to and hereby made part of these 
minutes . 

The proposal for a Four-College Ph.D. degree in Spanish 
was discussed at some length, including inquiries as to the pro- 
cedure for clearances and approvals by the participating institu- 
tions. 



Assistant 
Deans 






Trustee 
Seminar 



Undergraduate 

Curriculum 

Changes 



Four-College 
Ph.D. in 
Spanish 



'C; 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



After general discussion, it was moved,- seconded and 

WEED: To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
approve the proposed Four-College Ph.D. 
in Spanish (Document 64-067 which is* 
attached to and hereby made part of 
these minutes) with the exception of 
the new graduate courses proposed in 
French which are tabled for further 
consideration at a later meeting, 

The committee felt that it would be helpful to discuss 

i e -.r°5 OSals f ° r the ? raduate - p ^nch courses with representatives 
of the department and/or the Graduate School. 

The President noted the need in the forthcoming year to 
strengthen and supplement the administrative staff and organization 
of the University in order to improve and facilitate the planni 
processes and the implementation of long-range developments and pro- 
grams. The President stated that currently the Bdministrative 
structure of the University is dangerously extended and that with 
the evolution of new programs and responsibilities that are being 
thrust upon the University, e strengthening of this area is 
absolutely essential to prevent a critical breakdown of eff^tiv**- 
ness and efficiency in operating the institution. Such a ' 
strengthening of staff would also provide an opportunity for re- 
allocation of duty assignments along functional lines and would aid 
m clarifying (without rigidifying) related jurisdictional 
responsibilities. 

TheTe being no further business, the meeting adjourned at 
12:22 p.m. for the purpose of holding an informal luncheon 
discussion. 



' Leo F. Redfern ' 
Acting Secretary 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
May 11, 1964, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle, 
Trustees Brown, Schuck, Treasurer 
Johnson, Acting Secretary Redfern, 
Dr. Venman, Trustee Sweig in 
attendance as guest of committee. 

The Chairman informed the committee of the continuing 
discussions with the Pareskys in connection with the Paresky 
property. It was the consensus of the committee that the $30,000 
authorized by the Board was a negotiated settlement figure that 
would be the total sum for the acquisition of this property. 

The Treasurer explained that a study is being made by 
Stone & Webster, Inc., analyzing future needs of the University in 
utilities; and that Stone & Webster will contact all appropriate 
parties in connection with this study. Following this there could 
be a meeting of the Buildings and Grounds Committee to discuss the 
Stone & Webster report prior to recommending to the Board, hope- 
fully by the June 6 meeting. 

The committee then continued discussion of the capital 
outlay program for fiscal 1966. The Treasurer said that the 
faculty had prepared extensive justification for their respective 
projects which had been sent to each member of the committee. 
There were basically two points of focus in preparing the capital 
outlay program: (l) the rapid growth in enrollments, and (2) the 
expanding needs of the graduate and research programs. 

The Treasurer informed the committee that the architects 
on the Fine Arts Center were now engaged in preliminary studies. 
He noted that appropriations had already been received for planning 
the agricultural laboratories and farm service buildings and that 
preliminary plans will soon be before the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee. The second addition to Bartlett was discussed ex- 
tensively. It was indicated that Federal money would be available 
to aid in the construction of this facility. It was suggested that 
perhaps with some design control, it would be possible to allow 
flexible use of this proposed building. The addition to the School 
of Education building was discussed and it was pointed out that the 
School is one of the most dynamic in terms of growth of the Uni- 
versity. The President spoke of the great need for a facility to 
provide services of a continuing education nature and noted the 
great lack of this type of facility in the public higher education 
system of the Commonwealth. He mentioned that the University has 
been discussing its responsibilities in this area with a number of 
interested organizations and agencies. It was pointed out that 
such a facility is also needed in connection with instructional 
programs in food service and restaurant management as well as 



2529 



Paresky 
Property 



Stone & 
Webster 
Study 



2530 



COMMITTEE 



Capital 
Outlay 
Program 
1966 



Capital 
Outlay 
Program 
1967 

Land 
Acauisition 



\ 

Sewer 
System 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

essential to continued growth of the conference program. There 
are possibilities that foundation or other private grants may be 
available to assist in building and furnishing the building. It 
was agreed that items for roads and pavements, renovation of old 
buildings, and equipment are essential to undergird the growth 
plans for the University in the years ahead. There was review of 
the recommended plans for facilities in life science, nursing, 
plant science, and nuclear and chemical engineering. Review was 
made of the priority listing. After general discussion, it was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board approve the 
capital outlay program for fiscal year 
1966 (Document 64-073 attached) with 
priority item #3 to be listed as second 
addition to Bartlett Hall and with the 
addition of $15,000 for planning money 
for Student Health Services addition. 

In adopting this capital outlay budget for 1966, it was 
noted that projects eliminated from the 1965 budget, if any, would 
be carried forward to fiscal 1966. 

The proposed capital outlay plan for fiscal year 1967 was 
discussed at length. It was noted that the plan for the Waltham 
academic building may be contingent upon prospective development of 
the University facilities in Boston. It was, therefore, deleted 
until the need was established. In connection with the addition 
to the Student Health Services (which the committee voted to place 
in the fiscal year 1966 budget requests) the committee felt ex- 
pansion of this facility should not intrude upon the Rhododendron 
Garden to the north. It was thereupon moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

accept and approve the capital outlay pro- 
gram as proposed for fiscal year 1967 
(Document 64-074 attached) . 

The Treasurer noted that the Town of Amherst is request- 
ing an easement of 30 feet in width for the purpose of laying and 
maintaining a sewer line across the property of the University and 
that this sewage facility would aid in servicing the new football 
site and other facilities of the University. After general 
discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees of 
the University grant to the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Amherst, Hampshire County, 
Massachusetts, an easement thirty (30) feet 
in width for the purpose of laying and 
maintaining a sewer line across property of 
the University which will provide the 
necessary sewage facilities for the proposed 



COMMITTEE 



I 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



new football site and other athletic 
facilities for the University; such ease- 
ment to commence at the Town of Amherst 
Sewage Treatment Plant and to continue to 
Amity Street so-called, as shown on a plan 
entitled, "Easement for Sewers through land 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, dated 
February 1964, No. 8-SG63-L15, drawn by 
Haley & Ward, Engineers". The granting of 
this easement is contingent upon the con- 
firmation of the authority of the Trustees 
to grant such an easement. 

The Treasurer described the necessity for the acquisition 
by the University of acquiring certain lands and buildings held by 
Elsie Blasko in order to move forward the development of the south- 
west portion of the campus. After general discussion, it was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : In accordance with Chapter 705, Acts of 
1962, Item 8063-19, authorizing the 
Trustees of the University to acquire 
certain lands with the buildings thereon, 
for the development of the University, by 
purchase or by eminent domain under Chapter 
79 of the General Laws, and the authority 
granted therein, independent appraisals of 
the value of the land and buildings having 
been made by qualified disinterested 
appraisers, and filed with Kenneth W. 
Johnson, Treasurer, on motion duly made 
and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
of the University purchase, or take by 
eminent domain, in fee, the property of 
Elsie Blasko situate on the westerly side 
of Sunset Avenue in Amherst, Hampshire 
County, Massachusetts, and being the same 
premises described in a deed from Frank P. 
Toole to Stanley Blasko, dated November 12, 
1913, and recorded in the Hampshire County 
Registry of Deeds, Book 696, Page 391, and 
that the purchase price for said property 
be Seventeen Thousand Four Hundred Ninety 
($17,490.00) dollars. 

The Treasurer noted that the University was now pre- 
pared to undertake the first phase of the long-range campus traffic 
plan and for this purpose it would be necessary to have Board 
approval of the contract with the lowest eligible bidder, Warner 
Brothers, Inc., of Sunderland for Project 63-I. After discussion, 
it was moved, seconded and 



2531 



Blasko 
Property 



2532 



COMMITTEE 

Roads, 
Sidewalks & 
Parking Areas 



Next 

Meeting 

Date 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
of the University award the contract for 
the construction of roads, sidewalks, and 
parking areas, Project 63-1, Account No. 
8363-08, W.R. 42829, to the lowest 
eligible and responsible bidder, Warner 
Brothers, Incorporated, Sunderland, in 
amount of the base bid of $55,338.00 and 
to authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, to execute said construction 
contract in the name of and for the 
Board of Trustees and to take any and all 
other actions necessary to complete the 
work in accordance with the plans and 
specifications . 

After discussion, it was agreed that the Buildings and 
Grounds Committee should meet on Monday, June 1, at 9:30 a.m. in 
the President's Office, Amherst. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 12:43 p.m. 




Leo F. 

Acting Secretary 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
May 22, 1964, 3:30 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Trustee Healey, President 
Lederle, Trustees Crowley, 
Pumphret, Treasurer Johnson, 
Acting Secretary Redfern, 
Mr. Broadhurst 



Mr. Healey, serving as Chairman, called the committee 
to order at 3:36 p.m. He introduced Mr. Broadhurst who presented 
a proposed Management and Services Agreement for the new (third 
project) Dining Hall scheduled to come on the line next fall. 
Mr. Broadhurst stated that he will prepare for the June 6 meeting 
of the Board a series of resolutions and votes necessary to 
approve and to implement the requirements necessary in order for 
the project to proceed. Mr. Broadhurst promised to make available 
copies of the proposed Management and Services Agreement to the 
Trustees of the Board with a notice of the proposed vote. 

After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; That the Executive Committee gives 
preliminary approval to and refers 
to the Board the proposed Management 
and Services Agreement as presented 
by the Building Authority bond 
counsel. 

At the request of the President, the Treasurer 
distributed copies of a memorandum from D6an of Students, 
Dr. William Field, dated May 21, 1964- . In the memorandum, Dean 
Field cites the urgent pressures for space at the campus that 
makes highly desirable the acceleration of the building schedules 
for the remainder of the southwest area projects. Copies of 
Dean Field's memorandum will be distributed to the Board. The 
Treasurer said the request for accelerating the schedule would be 
presented at the next meeting of the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee of the Board for their consideration. If approved by 
the committee and subsequently by the Board, such a request would 
be presented to the Building Authority. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 4:58 p.m. 



2533 



Management 

and 
Services 
Agreement 





Leo F. Redfern 
Acting Secretary 



2534 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



COMMITTEE 



COMMITTEE 



Mt)Ot) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMfCETTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
June 1, 1964, 9:30 a.m., President's Office, U of M 



PRESENT : Trustee Haigis, President Lederle, Trustees Brown 

Emerson, Schuck, Treasurer Johnson, Acting Secretary 
Redfein, Mr. Hugill and representatives from Stone & 
Webster: Mr. White, Mr. Cassidy and Mr. Plante 

The Chairman convened the meeting and indicated the first 
item on the agenda was discussion of the 1965 Capital Outlay Budget. 
At the request of the President, the Treasurer made a report upon 
the current status of the 1965 Capital Outlay Budget. 

The committee then took up a discussion of the proposed 
amendments to the Traffic Rules and Regulations, copies of which 
had been circulated to members of the committee. The Treasurer 
explained that experience over a period of one year plus changes 
which had been made in the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
relative to motor vehicle regulations, required some amendments 
to the University automobile regulations. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend Board approval of the amend- 
ments to the Traffic Rules and Regulations 
as contained in Document 64-081 which are 
attached to and hereby made part of these 
minutes . 

The Chairman then invited in the representatives of 
Stone and Webster, Engineering Consultants. The representatives 
explained the approach and preliminary status of the report which 
they had undertaken in regard to a study of the alternative 
methods of heating University dormitories and buildings, especially 
in connection with planned new dormitory facilities. They noted 
that a careful cost analysis had been made and that preliminary 
findings showed, on the basis of bids received for the first phase 
of the southwest dormitories, that steam heated hot water circula- 
tion system was the most advantageous at the moment. They noted, 
however, that there are non-cost advantages that accrue to electric 
heating including finer system of control (room by room adjustments 
if desired) . They informed the committee of certain projected 
fourteen year average cost estimates that had been calculated, 
which included capital cost and depreciation. Other aspects that 
had been considered included matters of delivery, storage, handling, 
residue, types and grades of fuel energy, and future prospective 
trends in various markets. The value of insulating buildings, 
regardless of type of heating used, was explained and the Stone and 
Webster representatives noted that some insulation would be 
economically warranted in achieving heating economies, not to 
mention non-costed advantages during summer time use of buildings. 
They expressed the view that electric heating should be continued 
under review even though on the basis of current projects it is 
not economical. 



Capital 
Outlay 



Amendments 
to Traffic 
Rules and 
Regulations 



Report of 
Stone & 
Webster 



2536 



COMMITTEE 



Southwest 
Dormitories 

steam heated 
hot water 

Request for 
Acceleration 
of Southwest 
Project 



Horticultural 
Research 
Center - 
rental rate 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman thanked the representatives of Stone and 
Webster for their informative discussion prior to their departure 
from the meeting. 

A question was raised as to the treatment and color of the 
facing of the new dormitory exteriors and the opinion of the com- 
mittee was that this matter should he decided in terms consonant 
with existing patterns on campus. The President was requested to 
raise this matter with the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority . 

After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board that heating for 
project #4 (first phase southwest area) 
should be steam heated hot water on the 
basis of bids received by the Building 
Authority May 20, 1964. 

The President explained the tremendous pressures for 
space that exist and will increase during the next five or six-year 
period. In view of these pressures, there is an urgent need to move 
forward as expeditiously as possible in the next phase of the south- 
west project. A revised dormitory schedule of construction was pre- 
sented and discussed (Document 64-O84). After general discussion, 
it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustess that a 
request be made to the University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Authority to put out to bid 
as soon as possible the second group of dormi- 
tories for completion by August 1966 (project 
#6) on the basis of three alternatives in 
regard to heating systems (Document 64-O84): 

1. Steam heated hot water 

2 . Electric 

3. Steam hot water heating except 
for one high-rise dormitory 
on an all-electric basis 

At the request of the Chairman, the Treasurer explained 
the recommendation of the Dean of the College of Agriculture to 
establish a rental rate for the caretaker's house at the Horti- 
cultural Research Center in Belchertown. It was pointed out that 
as this would be a Trust Fund operation, no cost would accrue to 
the State for providing utilities for this house. In addition, it 
was recognized that the tenant has added responsibilities serving 
as night watchman and weekend security for the property. After 
general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : T> recommend the Board authorize a rental of 
$35.00 for the house at the Horticultural 
Research Center Trust Fund which shall 
support the cost of utilities for said 
facility. 



I 



1 



COMMITTEE 



2537 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman noted that inspection of the School of 
Business Administration Building, the Ralph C. Mahar Auditorium 
and the addition to Hasbrouck Physics Building would take place 
after lunch. 

Under other business, it was noted by the Treasurer that 
he had received a letter from the legal counsel of Mrs. Ada 
Paresky indicating the willingness of his client to accept $30,000 
plus interest as settlement for her property taken by the University 
in conformance with the requirements of the University Master Plan. 
Mrs, Paresky' s lawyer indicated the offer will stand until June 2 
at which time petition may be made for land damages in the land 
court. It was the consensus of the committee that they had no 
authority to change an offer which had been made by the Board of 
Trustees . 

Following the luncheon, the committee visited the School 
of Business Administration Building and the Ralph C. Mahar 
Auditorium. After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acceptance of the School of Business Ad- 
ministration Building and the Ralph C. 
Mahar Auditorium as completed in accordance 
with the plans and specifications subject 
to the completion and repair of a list of 
items on file with the Treasurer. 

The committee inspected the addition to Hasbrouck 
Physics Building and after general discussion, it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acceptance of the addition to Hasbrouck 
Physics Building as completed in accordance 
with the plans and specifications subject 
to the completion and repair of a list of 
items on file with the Treasurer. 

There being no further business, the committee adjourned 
at 2:54 p.m. 



Paresky 
Property 



d F.^Redfern / \T 



Leo 

Acting Secretary 



School of 
Business Ad- 
ministration 
acceptance 

Ralph C. Mahar 
Auditorium 



Hasbrouck 
Laboratory 
addition 
acceptance 



2538 



COMMITTEE 



Under graduate 

Course 

Changes 



Ph.D. in 
French 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

June 2, 1964, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, U of M, Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Schuck, President Lederle, Trustees 
Crowley, Troy, Haigis, Lyons, Plimpton, 
Provost Tippo, Acting Secretary Redfern, 
Dr. Venman 

The Chairman indicated Item 1 of the agenda was the 
undergraduate curricular changes contained in Document 64-075. 
There was general discussion as to the relationship of proposed 
curricular changes to the total curriculum pattern of the Uni- 
versity. It was suggested that a meeting with the Dean of Agri- 
culture would be helpful to the committee in gaining a better 
understanding and ability to evaluate the program proposal in 
Restaurant and Hotel Management and other programs in the College 
of Agriculture. It was hoped that an opportunity would be provided 
in the future for the committee to meet with Dean Spielman. 

After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To approve the proposed curricular changes 

as contained in Document 64-075 in the College 
of Agriculture with the exception of the new 
course requested in Restaurant and Hotel 
Management which would be the subject of 
subsequent committee consideration. 

After general discussion, it was moved, seconded 
and 

VOTED : To approve the curricular changes for the 
College of Arts and Sciences as set forth 
in the memorandum from the Associate Dean 
of Arts and Sciences dated April 14, 1964. 

Professor Taylor, Head of the Department of Romance 
Languages, being available, the Chairman with the concurrence of 
the committee postponed further action on curricular changes and 
invited Professor Taylor into the meeting. Professor Taylor 
discussed the proposals for the graduate courses in French as 
contained in Document 64-076. He stated that the proposed French 
courses were designed as part of the balanced program in the Depart- 
ment of Romance Languages and were intended primarily to provide a 
minimum level of offerings at the Ph.D. level in order that Uni- 
versity candidates could be assured an opportunity for reasonable 
progression towards their degree. 

The strength of the Four-College Cooperative Program 
would be retained as appropriate and desirable, however, in the 
development of this program. Professor Taylor went on to explain 



IMITTEE 



2539 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that the need to study each century, in French literary history, 
is required in the curriculum to reflect the basic motivations 
and cultural forces indigenous to the various eras. Historical 
courses reflect literary monuments of the periods covered. 

He noted that the department is adding two top-flight 
staff persons in the area of French instruction. The department 
now has approximately 14 candidates and it is estimated that there 
will be fairly rapid expansion of the doctoral program if the pro- 
posed courses are authorized. Professor Taylor explained briefly 
the basic differences between the 100 and 200 level courses and 
there was some discussion as to the appropriateness of allowing 
exceptional undergraduate seniors to participate in the graduate 
courses. Professor Taylor indicated the plans of the department 
in regard to developing and strengthening the library holdings in 
the area of French studies and the cooperation which the depart- 
ment has received in its plans from the University Library and the 
Dean of Arts and Sciences in this effort. 

The Chairman thanked Professor Taylor for his informative 
presentation prior to his withdrawal from the meeting. 

After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend Board approval of the proposed 
graduate courses in French as contained in 
Document 64-076. 

Returning to the undergraduate curricular changes, the 
committee discussed the curricular offerings for the Department of 
Management in the School of Business Administration as contained 
in a memorandum from Professor Claunch dated April 8, 1964. After 
general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend Board approval of the proposed 
courses in the Department of Management as 
contained in the memorandum of Professor 
Claunch dated April 8, 1964. 

After discussion of the proposal by the School of 
Education to change the credit authorization from 2 to 3 for 
Physical Education 75, it was the consensus of the committee that 
this matter should be postponed until further study and considera- 
tion. 

The President discussed, in the absence of the Acting 
Secretary (Dr. Venman serving as Acting Secretary pro tern), the 
need for strengthening portions of the administrative structure of 
the University in order to better meet the heavy burdens being 
imposed upon a growing institution. There was discussion as to 
future potential developments in the area of University structure 
and organization. The President indicated that at the present 



Department of 

Management 

Courses 



Dean of 
Administratio] 



2540 



COMMITTEE 



Dean of 
Adminis trat ion 



Residential 

College 

Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

time a Dean of Administration is essential to enable the Presidents 
Office to carry out many of the numerous burdens being placed upon 
the President. The statement of need for such a position was 
referred to along with the duty descriptions of the position. 

The necessity for adequately staffing other administra- 
tive offices, including the University Secretary's position was 
discussed. 

After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend Board approval of the position of 
Dean of Administration, U of M. 

Upon recommendation of the President, and after general 
discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend the appointment of Leo F. 

Redfern as Dean of Administration, U of M. 

The committee reconvened in the Dukes Room, Student Union, 
with a luncheon discussion of the Residential College program. 
Professor Varley and Dean Field were invited into the meeting to 
describe the planning and proposed operation of the Residential 
College program. Professor Varley said the basic aim included the 
hope of establishing an intellectual tone for dormitory living that 
would encourage study and would also allow for the use of some 
dormitory facilities for certain classes to be held especially in 
the late afternoon period. Such classes would normally include 20 
students but on special occasions might rise to as large as 50 
students. Approximately 1% of class membership would be drawn 
from dormitory residents but the balance would be drawn from stu- 
dents in other living units on campus. The House Master was explor- 
ing the possibility of including some Honors Colloquia in the 
dormitory instructional program. 

Professor Varley said that arrangements would be possible 
for cultural programs and that it was intended to utilize the 
Dining Commons arrangements for each building to have joint dinners 
and a high table. The staff of each building would include a 
Preceptor, Resident Faculty member and 10 to 12 Faculty Fellows 
selected on a voluntary interdisciplinary basis and on the basis 
of recommendations of their colleagues. 

Dean Field stated that in regard to special educational 
programs, the University is proposing to the Danforth Foundation 
a request for funds to implement these programs in the Residential 
College. Danforth has approved funds for initial phases of the 
program and the University is beginning preparation of a proposal 
for added funds to support the next three years of a program in 
order to provide a total coverage of at least one generation of 
students. The Danforth Foundation is interested in the problems of 
faculty-student relations, especially in institutions growing 
quickly in a quantitative sense. They would provide for independent 



COMMITTEE 



2541 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

evaluation and appraisals of the programs which they have 
supported, although this would in no wise intrude upon University 
independence in operation the programs. 

(Trustee Lyons left at 1:03 p.m. for a prior 
commitment) 

It was noted that most disciplinary actions will be 
handled by House Counsellors working for the Dean of Students but 
under the House Master of the Residential College. Dean Field 
stated that the program also may help the problem of "faculty 
absorption into the University community" which may be especially 
valuable to younger new faculty members. It was noted that three 
play areas are anticipated for use to supplement the physical edu- 
cation program and to allow for leisure time use. Dean Field 
noted that the Building Authority sub-committee has agreed to a 
plan of collecting art work from young Massachusetts artists and 
craftsmen for furnishing the dormitories. 

Professor Varley explained that students volunteer for 
living in the Residential College buildings. There is no Uni- 
versity screening process and the voluntary procedure calls forth 
a fairly representative "mix". The estimated class distribution 
that would be found in the Residential College would be approxi- 
mately one-half freshmen, one-quarter sophomores and one-quarter 
juniors and seniors. 

The Chairman expressed the hope that the Faculty and 
Program of Study Committee would be kept informed in the future as 
the program develops and evolves. 

Acting Secretary Redfern reported on the status of legis- 
lative Bill S.&49. He indicated that after a lengthy hearing on 
Wednesday, May 27, at which the University received strong support 
from labor groups, League of Women Voters and other interested 
parties, the Joint Committee on Education had issued a favorable 
report on the bill. The bill had been opposed largely by the 
State College Presidents (with the exception of one) and by faculty 
and students of Boston State College. The Chairman of the Board 
of Regional Community Colleges gave strong support. President Case 
of Boston University had appeared in opposition to the bill on the 
grounds that the problem, although pressing, might require further 
study. 

Senator Harrington had introduced two amendments. One, 
striking the grant of eminent domain authority to the Trustees, 
had been discussed previously with University officials and 
although it had not been acceptable to them, Senator Harrington 
had nevertheless introduced it, acknowledging the fact the Uni- 
versity did not approve this amendment. The University has always 
exercised eminent domain authority under capital outlay appropri- 
ations and, as the Joint Committee was informed in a memorandum 
submitted by the Acting Secretary, had never received adverse 



Boston 
Branch 



2542 



COMMITTEE 



Department of 
Environmental 
Science 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

criticism for its prudent and judicious use of such authority 
when it had been necessary. It was felt, that if extensive capital 
outlay requirements might at some time in the future be required 
that it might be appropriate at that time to request legislative 
grant of eminent domain authority as had been customary in the past. 

The second of Senator Harrington's amendments had been 
much more extensive than the University had been given to understand 
was his original intent. Earlier the University had understood the 
Senator would strike out the phrase "or other places" on the grounds 
some people felt the University might attempt to establish two or 
three universities in the Boston area. Obviously as this is not 
the intent within the foreseeable future such a modification would 
have been acceptable. However, Senator Harrington's amendment as 
presented to the Joint Education Committee was supported by the 
Senator on the grounds of prohibiting the University from locating 
within the city limits of Boston. Subsequently, when the Committee 
Chairman, Senator Fonesca, asked the President whether the amend- 
ment was acceptable, the President responded that the University 
would carry out whatever wishes the Legislature enacted in the 
legislation. It was the opinion of the University observers that 
at that point, in lacking the opportunity for prior consultation 
with Senator Harrington on his actual amendments, it would have 
been unwise to oppose outright the amendment offered (particularly 
as the intent of the amendment had not been immediately clear to 
many observers). 

Mr. Redfern concluded that although the general sentiment 
apparently is strongly in favor of having a University facility in 
the Boston area that time is becoming a critical factor in view of 
the legislative desire for prorogation within the next two or three 
weeks. The University would pursue the matter most diligently. 

The President stated that the administration with the 
concurrence of Provost Tippo was recommending the establishment of 
a Department of Environmental Sciences. Such a recommendation was 
necessary at this time in order that the Department, if authorized 
by the Board, could be functioning by the opening of the next 
academic year. Inasmuch as the Board of Trustees had already been 
informed of this proposal by the Chairman of the Faculty and Program 
of Study Committee at a previous meeting, the President hoped that, 
with the approval of the Committee, the Board would be able to act 
upon this matter at its meeting on June 6. It was emphasized that 
the recommendation does not include the authorization for a 
Master's degree program, plans for which would be subsequent In- 
formally proposed to the Committee and the Board at a later date. 
The Waltham Field Station facilities would be used largely for 
research and Master's thesis work at this time, said the Provost. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend the Board approve the establish- 
ment of a Department of Environmental Sciences 
as contained in Document 64-065. 

There being no further business, the Committee 
adjourned at 2:04 p.m. 




Leo r. Redfern 
Acting Secretary 



2543 



Department of 
Env i ronmental 
Sciences 



2544 



COMMITTEE 



College of 
Agriculture - 
reorganization 



Department of 
Plant & Soil 
•Sciences 



Department of 
Veterinary & 
Animal Science^ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE 

June 22, 1964, 12:30 p.m., Parker House Boston 

PRESENT ; Trustees Brown, Emerson, Lyons, McNamara; 
Provost Tippo, Treasurer Johnson, Dean 
Redfern, Dean Spielraan, Associate Dean 
Jeffrey, Assistant Dean Allan of the 
College of Agriculture; Associate Director 
of Agricultural Extension Beattie, Associate 
Director of the Experiment Station Damon; 
Secretary McCartney, President Lederle 

Chairman Emerson called for informal discussion of 
certain organizational changes proposed for the College of Agri- 
culture which would have the effect of consolidating instructional 
programs in the Departments of Agronomy and Horticultural Sciences- 
Dairy Technology and Food Science and Technology; also the Depart- 
ments of Veterinary, Poultry and Dairy and Animal Science. The 
administrative services in Agricultural Communications would be 
consolidated with the central information services of the Office 
of University Relations. 

After lengthy discussion of the principal issues 
involved, and full consideration of the benefits which would accrue 
to the College of Agriculture and to the University, it was 

VOTED : That the adoption of the following reso- 
lutions are hereby recommended to the 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts, 
namely: 

"Resolved that effective July 1, 1964 the 
Departments of Agronomy and Horticultural 
Science in the College of Agriculture are 
hereby abolished; that a Department of 
Plant and Soil Sciences is hereby established 
in said College and that the duties, functions 
and programs formerly conducted by the Deaprt- 
ments of Agronomy and Horticultural Science 
be conducted by the Department of Plant and 
Soil Sciences, subject to such revision and 
change as the Dean of the College of Agri- 
culture may deem advisable. 

"Resolved that effective July 1, 1964 the 
Department of Veterinary Science, the De- 
partment of Poultry Science, and the Depart- 
ment of Dairy and Animal Science in the 
College of Agriculture are hereby abolished; 
that a Department of Veterinary and Animal 
Sciences is hereby established in said 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF 



iASSACHUSETTS 



College and that the duties, functions and 
programs formerly conducted by the Depart- 
ments of Veterinary Science, Poultry Science 
and Dairy and Animal Science be conducted 
by the Department of Veterinary and Animal 
Sciences, except that the duties, functions, 
and programs of the Department of Dairy and 
Animal Science pertaining to dairy technology 
and meats be conducted by the Department of 
Food Science and Technology, subject to such 
revision and change as the Dean of the College 
of Agriculture may deem advisable. 

"Resolved that effective July 1, 1964 the De- 
partment of .Agricultural Communications in the 
College of .Agriculture is hereby abolished, 
and that the duties, functions and programs 
formerly conducted by the Department of Agri- 
cultural Communications be conducted by the 
Office of University Relations, subject to 
such revision and change as the Secretary of 
the University and Director of University 
Relations may deem advisable. 

"Resolved that effective July 1, 1964 
Franklin W.Southwick, formerly Head of the 
Department of Horticultural Science, which 
department has been abolished, be and he 
hereby is appointed Head of the Department 
of Plant and Soil Sciences, without tenure 
in such position, such appointment to be 
concurrent with the continuing appointment 
of said Franklin W. Southwick as Professor 
of Horticulture, v/ith tenure in such position, 
the appointment hereby made being under and 
subject to the Policies, Rules and Regulations 
on Tenure of the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts, and to all other relevant, 
published policies and conditions of employ- 
ment in professional positions on the staff 
of the University and without change in 
present compensation. 

"Resolved that effective July 1, 1964 William 
George Colby, formerly Head of the Department 
of Agronomy, which department has been 
abolished, be and he hereby is confirmed in 
a continuing appointment as Professor of 
Agronomy, with tenure in such position, the 
appointment hereby made being under and 
subject to the Policies, Rules and Regulations 
on Tenure of the Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts, and to all other relevant, 



2545 



Office of 

University 

Relations 



Franklin W, 
Southwick 



William G. 
Colby 



2546 



COMMITTEE 



Thomas W. Fox 



^enzel J. 
Harikinson 



Glenn H. 
Snoeyenbos 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

published policies and conditions of employ- 
ment in professional positions on the staff 
of the University and without change in pre- 
sent compensation. 

"Resolved that effective July 1, 1964 Dr. 
Thomas W. Fox, formerly Head of the Depart- 
ment of Poultry Science, Y/hich department 
has been abolished, be and he hereby is 
appointed Head of the Department of Veterinary 
and Animal Sciences, without tenure in such 
position, such appointment to be concurrent 
with the continuing appointment of said Dr. 
Thomas W.Fox as Professor of Avian Genetics, 
with tenure in such position, the appoint- 
ment hereby made being under and subject to 
the Policies, Rules and Regulations on Tenure 
of the Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts, and to all other relevant, published 
policies and conditions of employment in pro- 
fessional positions on the staff of the Uni- 
versity and without change in present compen- 
sation. 

"Resolved that effective July 1, 1964- Denzel J. 
Harikinson, formerly Head of the Department of 
Dairy and Animal Science, which department has 
been abolished, be and he hereby is confirmed 
in a continuing appointment as Professor of 
Dairy Technology, with tenure in such position, 
the appointment hereby being made under and 
subject to the Policies, Rules and Regulations 
on Tenure of the Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts, and to all other relevant, 
published policies and conditions of employ- 
ment in professional positions on the staff 
of the University and without change in pre- 
sent compensation. 

"Resolved that effective July 1, 1964 Glenn H. 
Snoeyenbos, formerly Head of the Department of 
Veterinary Science, which department has been 
abolished, be and he hereby is confirmed in a 
continuing appointment as Professor of 
Veterinary Science, with tenure in such 
position, the appointment hereby made being 
under and subject to the Policies, Rules and 
Regulations on Tenure of the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts, and to all other 
relevant, published policies and conditions of 
employment in professional positions on the 
staff of the University and without change in 
present compensation. 



COMMITTEE 



I 



2547 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"Resolved that effective July 1, 196-4 
Gilbert E. Mottla, formerly Head of the Depart- 
ment of Agricultural Communications, which 
department has been abolished, be and he 
hereby is confirmed in a continuing appoint- 
ment as Head of Department "A", with tenure 
in such position, the appointment hereby made 
being under and subject to the Policies, Rules 
and Regulations on Tenure of the Trustees of 
the University of Massachusetts, and to all 
other relevant, published policies and con- 
ditions of employment in professional positions 
on the staff of the University and without 
change in present compensation." 

Dean Spielman gave a report on future plans of the College 
of Agriculture touching on several issues which would be considered 
in the future including: 

1. Change of Name for the College 

He reported that the diverse nature of the various programs 
in Agriculture made difficult the selection of an all-inclusive 
choice of name. Faculty discussion in the College and the polling 
of faculty votes through a mail ballot all indicate that the 
majority of the College accepts the desirability of a name change, 
but there is at present no substantial concurrence on a specific 
name. 

Several examples of name changes at other universities 
were given including that of College of Life Sciences and Agri- 
culture at the University of Maine. 

Dean Spielman stated that the major consideration in- 
volved in a change of name lies in the effect which such a change 
would have on student morale and enrollments in the College. He 
requested from the President a mandate that a name change be 
placed in effect. Further discussion revolved around possible use 
of the words "applied science" or "environmental sciences" or 
"economic biology" in the title. 

President Lederle stated that, within a year, a title 
change should be evolved which would qualify appropriately the 
word "agriculture" in the name of the College. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED t That the Dean of Agriculture consult with 
appropriate staff members to evolve a 
recommendation for a change in name of the 
College of Agriculture which would appro- 
priately reflect the scope of the disciplines 
administered by the College. 



2548 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

2. Resource Development and Community Planning 

Dean Spielman stated that resource development and 
community planning would be prime topics of future concern for the 
College. Activity in this area might go under the Holdsworth 
Resource Center, or might evolve into a separate center. There was 
brief discussion of the Water Resources Bill nor/ before Congress. 
Hope was expressed that the bill v/ould be passed and become a 
source of research funds for land-grant universities including the 
University of Massachusetts. 

3. Graduate Training Program Cor Agricultural Agents 

Assistant Dean Allan discussed the new Graduate Training 
Program financed on federal funds, enabling qualified county agri- 
cultural agents to obtain advanced degrees . One semester of 
residence work is required. He briefed the committee on progress 
in the search for heads of the Departments of Landscape Architecture, 
and Entomology and Plant Pathology. 

4-. Nine and Eleven-Month Appointments 

Dean Spielman recommended that every faculty appointment 
at the University be made either on a nine or an eleven-month basis, 
and reported a consensus of the College of Agriculture faculty that 
nine-month appointments were preferred. It was suggested that, if 
the College were converted uniformly to nine-month appointments, the 
salaries of present eleven-month individuals be continued. 

President Lederle discussed some of the pros and cons of 
the administrative problem of salary equalization as between nine 
and eleven-month appointments and summer session appointments. He 
reported that the College of Arts and Sciences is trying to eliminate 
eleven-month appointments . 

The meeting concluded with the Chairman and the Committee 
commending Dean Spielman and his associates for the excellence of 
their reports, and with the suggestion by the Chairman that another 
meeting of the Committee be called at an early date. 

The meeting adjourned at ^rQ^ p.m. 




- rlU* 



Rdbert J. McCartney 
Secretary ^ 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIIVERSBTY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

July 2, 1964, 11:16 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Healey, President Lederle, Trustee 
Troy, Provost Tippo, Treasurer Johnson, Dean 
Redfern, Mr. Wood of Standish, Ayer & McKay, 
and Secretary McCartney 

After brief discussion of the agenda, it was agreed to 
begin committee deliberations with a consideration of Item Two 
concerning the establishment of new endowment funds. 

Treasurer Johnson stated that, in the past the Administra- 
tion had requested Board approval and acceptance of endowment funds. 
He noted that a review of the Board minutes indicated that the 
following funds have been received since the last Board action and 
have not received such recognition, although they have been 
established on the books of the University by administrative 
direction: 

1. THE STOCKBRIDGE SCHOOL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION FUND 

2. THE DISTINGUISHED VISITORS COMMITTEE FUND 

3. THE MARGARET RUTH PCMEROY HAMLIN FUND 

The Treasurer said that the Stockbridge School Alumni 
Association had given the Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts on May 25, 1963, the sum of $1,161.33 to establish an 
endowment fund. Interest income is to be used at the discretion of 
the Director of the Stockbridge School for the purpose of assisting 
worthy students, promoting School programs, or for stimulating 
good teaching by the faculty. 



2549 



follows : 



The balance of the fund as of June 30, 1964 was given as 



Endowment 
Funds 



Principal 
Income 



$1,161.38 
29.07 



After brief discussion it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Trustees that the 
appropriate officers of the University 
are authorized to establish the Stock- 
bridge School Alumni Fund as an Endow- 
ment Fund, and that it be retroactive 
to May 25, 1963 to conform with account- 
ing records. 



Stockbridge 
School Alumni 
Association 
Fund 



2550 



COMMITTEE 



Distinguished 
Visitors Fund 



Margaret P. 
Hamlin Fund 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Treasurer noted that the Distinguished Visitors Com- 
mittee Fund was established by the students of the University of 
Massachusetts to provide investment income fro the support of the 
Distinguished Visitors Progran, which is operated under the auspices 
of the Student Senate and R.S.O. Committee. The Distinguished 
Visitors Program Committee, with the advise of the Finance Sub- 
Committee, has the power to invest money in the University' s Student 
Loan Program and the Ndea Loan Program. Upon the return of the 
principal accruing from the trust fund, it shall be placed in the 
Endowment Fund semi-annually, December 31, and June 30. The return 
of the principal and any income to the committee shall be made by 
the mutual consent of the committee and the Treasurer of the Uni- 
versity. After January 1, 1970, all income from the Endowment Fund 
shall be applied to the Program account. 

The balance of the account as of June 30, 1964- was given 
as follows: 

Principal $8,344.17 
Income 208.85 

It was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Trustees that the 
appropriate officers of the University 
are authorized to establish the Dis- 
tinguished Visitors Committee Fund as 
an Endowment Fund pursuant to the pro- 
visions of the constitution of the 
Distinguished Visitors Committee, and, 
as it may be subsequently amended, and, 
acceptance is made retroactive to 
August 2, 1963 to conform with account- 
ing records. 

The Treasurer noted further that under the terms of an 
inter vivos trust between the First National Bank of Amherst and 
the late Margaret Ruth Pomeroy Hamlin, the University of Massa- 
chusetts was "bequeathed 20^ of the residue of the trust as the 
MARGARET RUTH POMEROY HAMLIN FUND. Under the terms of the trust, 
the bequest to the University is to be held in trust, the income 
to be used to aid deserving girls as directed by the Dean of Women 
at the University. 

Statement of the account was as follows: 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



PRINCIPAL : 
Cash 

Securities 
24 shares American Telephone and 
Telegraph Co. certificate #B225991 
©109 18/32 

24 shares The Borden Co., certificate 
certificate #0527651 @49-| 

48 shares Commonwealth Edison Co. 
common, certificate #91-1098791 
©42.0168181 

39 shares Continental Casualty Co., 
certificate #C255031 @78l 

36 shares General Electric Co. common 
certificate #BE319543 ©65 

3^ shares Insurance Co. of North America 
certificate #PA/0 248128 @79i 

27 shares J. C. Penney Co., common, 
certificate #090641 ©39 10/32 

47 shares Philadelphia Electric Co. 
common, certificate #00586470 ©29 5/S 



$ 1,021.41 



$2,629.50 

1,188.00 
2,016.81 

3,051.75 
2,340.00 
2,773.75 
1,061.44 
1,392.38 $16,453.63 



S17.475.04 



After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Trustees that the 
appropriate officers of the University 
are authorized to establish the Margaret 
Ruth Pomeroy Hamlin Fund as an Endowment 
Fund, and that it be retroactive to 
June 35, 1964 to conform with accounting 
records, and to add the securities to 
the investment pool. 

The Treasurer stated that the University is in receipt of 
a request from the University of Massachusetts Foundation, Inc. to 
make payment to the Foundation in July, 1964, due on funds advanced 
i: by the Foundation for NDEA. loans. 

The Board was reminded that, with the passing of the 
National Defense Education Act of 1958, the University required 
additional funds to support its matching quota in applying for a 
Federal Capital Contribution. The Foundation assisted the University 
and its students by making loans to support the program. Over a 
three-year period beginning with September 13, I960 and ending 
September 27, 1962, the University borrowed $18,773.75 from the 



2551 



University of 
Massachusetts 
Foundation 



/wOO^J 



COMMITTEE 



Trust Fund 

Interest 

Account 



Unrestricted 
Endowment Funds 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Foundation. The loans were demand and promissory notes at the same 
rates and on the same terms as collected under the provisions of 
the National Defense Education Act of 1958. 

An amendment to the 1958 Act prohibits the use of the 
interest collected from student loans until such time as the NDEA 
Program is liquidated, whereupon the total interest collected will 
be shared on the same 9 to 1 ratio as capital contributions. 

In view of this amendment, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Trustees that the pay- 
ment of interest to the Foundation be made 
annually from the Trust Fund Interest 
Account, and that the interest payment for 
the period through June 30, 1964 be pursuant 
to the schedule shown below. 



SCHEDULE OF NOTES PAYABLE 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS FOUNDATION, 
MATCHING FUNDS FOR NDEA LOANS 



INC. 



Principal 

$2,000.00 
760.00 
1,840.22 
5,000.00 
1,273.75 
2,299.78 
5.600.00 
$18,773.75 



Demand note, 3%, dated 9/13/60 
Demand note, 3%, dated 10/5/60 
Demand note, 3%, dated 10/20/60 
Demand note, 3%, dated 8/16/61 
Demand note, 3%, dated 1/18/62 
Promissory note, 3%, dated 1/16/61 
Promissory note, 3%, dated 9/27/62 



Interest Payable 
to June 30.1964 
$ 228.68 
85.50 
204.72 

433.34 

93.93 

238.97 

297.71 



$1.582.85 



It was further moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Trustees that all 
interest received upon liquidation of 
the National Defense Education Act be 
returned to the Trust Fund Interest 
Account . 

The Treasurer next reviewed expenditures and disbursements 
from the Unrestricted Endowment Fund and from the University Fund 
for the period July 1, 1963 through June 12, 1964. 

From various Unrestricted Endowment Funds, a total of 
$815.23 was disbursed against prior authorization of $1,000.00. 

From the University Fund, a total of $4,449.71 was 
disbursed against prior authorization totalling $5,000.00. 



COMMITTEE 



UNBVERSSTY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To accept the report of the 1964 disburse- 
ments from Unrestricted Endowment Fund 
Income and from the University Fund. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED: To recommend to the Trustees that the 
President be authorized to use for 
furtherance of the University's program 
$1,000 of unrestricted income from En- 
dowment Funds for the fiscal year 1965. 

The committee next moved to a review of the Report of the 
State Auditor. The Treasurer pointed out that the Report was 
critical principally of purchases under Trust Funds where records 
of bids taken on purchases were not always adequately kept and 
filed under a flexible policy which had been extended to Deans and 
Directors and others for direct purchase from Trust and Federal 
Funds available to them for expenditure. This had not previously 
been questioned in prior years by the auditors. The Treasurer was 
queried concerning the cut-off level where competitive bidding must 
start, and he responded that the level was $20.00 on State Funds. 
He pointed out that the Procurement Office is sometimes able to 
obtain non-competitive items without accepting bids; also, that the 
University is stocking up in general on a wider variety of supply- 
items. 

The committee was satisfied with the Treasurer's report 
and Trustee Healey recommended that a report of the Treasurer's 
comments on the Report of the State Auditor be transmitted to the 
Full Board of Trustees. (Document 65-004) 

With the permission of the permission of the Chairman, 
Mr. John M. Wood of Standish, Ayer & McKay, Inc., distributed a 
document entitled "Report on Endowment Fund and Operating Fund of 
the University of Massachusetts," as of April 1, 1964. The analysis 
as of April 1, 1964 shaved a total Endowment Fund appraised value of 
$679,321.62 with annual estimated income quoted at $23,842.69. A 
similar analysis for the University of Massachusetts operating fund 
showed the total fund book value at $3,497,445.67 with annual esti- 
mated income quoted at $104,157.91. 

The basic recommendation of Standish, Ayer & McKay, Inc., 
insofar as the University of Massachusetts Endowment Fund is con- 
cerned was to sell presently held shares of American Tobacco and 
Schering Corporation and to buy U. S. Treasury Bonds and G.M.A.C. 
debs. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 



2553 



Report of 
State Auditor 



Investment 

Counsel 

Service 



2554 



COMMITTEE 



Stocks 



Research 
Trust Fund 
Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Trustees that the 
Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, be 
authorized to sell: 

100 shares American Tobacco common 
100 shares Schering common 

and to buy for the Endowment Fund: 

30,000 U. S. Treasury Bonds 4i 

8/15/92-87 
20,000 G.M.A.C. debentures 5 5/8 

6/15/86-72 

With respect to the University of Massachusetts Operating 
Fund, the Standish, Ayer & McKay, Inc. Report observed that the 
income of the Operating Fund is somewhat vulnerable as virtually all 
assets are in very short maturities. In the past, interest rates on 
these very short maturities have undergone volatile fluctuations. 
Accordingly, any sharp decline in short-term interest rates would 
result in an important reduction in income in the fund. 

In this perspective, the investment counselors suggested 
that a small portion of the estimated minimum balance could be 
placed in an intermediate maturity in order to assure at least the 
current rate of income on this money for a few years. The firm 
noted that U. S. Treasury's are currently reasonably attractive. 
The committee decided to consider this when student payments in- 
crease available funds in early fall. 

After full discussion and line item review of the elements 
comprising the Research Trust Fund Budget and the Trust Fund Inter- 
est Budget for the fiscal year July 1, 1964 to June 30, 1965, it was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Trustees approval of 
the Research Trust Fund Budget for the 
fiscal year July 1, 1964 to June 30, 1965 
in the amount of $250,000 and to approve 
the Trust Fund Interest Budget for the 
fiscal year July 1, 1964 to June 30, 1965 
in the amount of $89,360.00. 

The budgets are detailed in the Trustee agendas. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned at 

." 
[I - 



i 



1:47 p.m. 




^ K>*<V*M - 



Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF AD HOC COMMITTEE ON MEDICAL SCHOOL 
July 2, 1964, 12:46 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Healey, President 
Lederle, Trustees Croce, 
Frechette, Plimpton, Solomon, 
Dean Soutter, Secretary McCartney 



The committee was called together to engage in brief 
discussions of pros and cons of gathering further consultant 
advice on use of Lemuel Shattuck Hospital as a University teach- 
ing hospital. 

After a brief exchange of comments, and in view of 
the fact that the main meeting of the Board of Trustees had 
already been delayed by several minutes, the meeting was 
adjourned at 12:58 p.m. 




/ 



s 



<j 



U' i'-l I -I / l I i ■ , 

Robert J. Mcfjartney- 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 




2555 



/OOeil) 



COMMITTEE 



Orrell 
Property 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

July 30, 196-4, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President 
Lederle, Trustees Emerson 
and Schuck; Provost Tippo, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 



At the invitation of the Chairman, Treasurer Johnson out- 
lined briefly the University's need to acquire certain properties 
so that work may proceed on schedule in the southwest dormitory 
complex. Brief discussion followed, after which, in accordance wit* 
Chapter 705, Acts of 1962, Item 8063-19, authorizing the Trustees 
of the University to acquire certain lands with the buildings 
thereon for the development of the University by purchase or by 
eminent domain under Chapter 79 of the General Laws and the 
authority granted therein, independent appraisals of the value of 
the land and buildings having been made by qualified disinterested 
appraisers and filed with Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer, and upon 
motion having been duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
purchase, or taking by eminent domain, in 
fee, the property of Kenneth H. Orrell and 
Blanche E. Orrell, husband and wife, 
situate on the westerly side of Sunset 
Avenue in Amherst, Hampshire County, 
Massachusetts, and being the same premises 
described in a deed from Burnett J. Doleva 
and Blanche E. Orrell, co-guardians of the 
property of John S. Doleva, to Kenneth H. 
Orrell and Blanche E. Orrell, dated 
January 9, 1962, and recorded in the 
Hampshire County Registry of Deeds, Book 
1370, Page 100, and that the purchase 
price for said property be Nineteen 
Thousand Five Hundred ($19,500.00) dollars. 

After further discussion and in accordance with Chapter 
705, Acts of 1962, Item 8063-19, authorizing the Trustees of the 
University to acquire certain lands with the buildings thereon for 
the development of the University by purchase or eminent domain 
under Chapter 79 of the General Laws and the authority granted 
therein, independent appraisals of the value of the land and build- 
ings having been made by qualified disinterested appraisers and 
filed with Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer, and upon motion having 
been duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the purchase, or taking by eminent 
domain, in fee, the property of Stephen 
R. and Mary A. Kosakowski, situate at 
198 Sunset Avenue, Amherst, Hampshire 
County, Massachusetts, and being Parcel 
6, Page 110, Town Atlas, Town of Amherst, 
and that the purchase price for said 
property be Twenty Three Thousand Nine 
Hundred ($23,900.00) dollars. 

After further discussion and in accordance with Chapter 
705, Acts of 1962, Item 3063-19, authorizing the Trustees of the 
University to acquire certain lands with the buildings thereon for 
the development of the University by purchase or eminent domain 
under Chapter 79 of the General Laws and the authority granted 
therein, independent appraisals of the value of the land and 
buildings having been made by qualified disinterested appraisers 
and filed with Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer, and upon motion 
having been duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

the purchase, or taking by eminent domain, 
in fee, the property of Agnes M, Doherty, 
situate at 222 Sunset Avenue, Amherst, 
Hampshire County, Massachusetts, and being 
Parcel 2, Page 110, Town Atlas, Town of 
Amherst, and that the purchase price for 
said property be Sixteen Thousand Five 
Hundred ($16,500.00) dollars. 

Treasurer Johnson reviewed the involvement of the firm 
of Sasaki, Walker & Associates, Inc. in the preliminary, overall 
master planning of the campus. Based on this involvement and to 
maintain consistent development of the master plan, the Treasurer 
recommended to the committee that this firm be selected to 
develop designs and prepare plans for roads, sidewalks, parking 
areas, etc. associated with current construction projects. After 
brief discussion, and upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the Board recommend to the 
Commissioner of Administration and 
Finance the appointment of Sasaki, Walker 
& Associates, Inc. of Watertown for the 
preparation of plans for roads, sidev/alks, 
parking areas, including necessary drainage; 
curbing, street lighting and adjacent land- 
scaping in accordance with the master plan 
prepared by the firm of Sasaki, Walker & 
Associates, Inc. and to supervise the con- 
struction thereof in accordance with Item 
8065-28, Chapter 640 of the Acts of 1964. 



2557 



Kosakowski 
ProDerty 



Doherty 
Property 



Sasaki, 
Walker & 
Associates, 
Inc. 



I ■!■■ Ill 



2558 



COMMITTEE 



Dining 
Commons in 
Southwest 
Dormitory- 
Area 



Architects 
Continuing 
Education 
Center and 
Addition to 
School of 
Education 



for 



Apartment 
Rental Rates: 
Ore liar d Hill 
Dormitories 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



A concurrent meeting of the University Building 
Authority having been concluded, plans for the Dining Commons in 
the Southwest Dormitory were submitted to the Committee for re- 
view, and upon motion having been duly made and seconded, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they accept the final plans for 
the Pining Commons in the Southwest 
Dormitory area as presented by Hugh 
"ubbins & Associates subject to re- 
view and modification of technical de- 
tails by the University; and to 
authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth 
Johnson, to indicate approval thereof 
by signing of the plans and specifica- 
tions. 

Treasurer Johnson next reported to the committee that the 
Bureau of Building Construction had requested recommendations from 
the Board of Trustees to Commissioner V/aldron's office listing 
architects who might be considered to design the Continuing Educa- 
tion Center and the Addition to the School of Education. Brief 
discussion followed concerning the recommendations of the Uni- 
versity's architectural consultant, Mr. Pietro Belluschi. The 
committee agreed to determine which of the architects recommended 
by Mr. Belluschi could be interviewed prior to the Board meeting 
on September 9 so that the matter could go to the full Board of 
Trustees on that date. 

Discussion followed on recommendations for the establish- 
ment of rental rates for Head of Resident, Resident Faculty and 
Area Director's Apartments in the "Orchard Hill" dormitories; also, 
Van Meter North, Baker and Mills Houses. 

Upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the Board recommend to the Uni- 
versity Building Authority that rental 
rates in the "Orchard Hill" dormitories 
be established for Head of Resident and 
Resident Faculty Apartments in accordance 
with the following schedule, effective 
upon the date of occupancy: 



1. Head of Resident Apartment 
Building "A" 

2. Resident Faculty Apartment 
Building "A" 



$30 per month inc. 
utilities 

$30 per month inc. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



3. Head of Resident Apartment 
Building ,f B n 

4. Resident Faculty Apartments 
Building "B" 

5.« Head of Resident Apartment 
Building »C" 

6. Resident Faculty Apartment 
Building ' ,r,n 

7. Head of Resident Apartment 
Building "D" 

8. Resident Faculty Apartment 
Building "D" 

It was further 



$30 per month inc. 
■ utilities 

$30 per month inc. 
utilities 

$30 per month inc. 
utilities 

$30 per month inc. 
utilities 

$30 per month inc. 
utilities 

$30 per month inc. 
utilities 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the establishment of rental rates for 
Head of Resident Apartments and Area 
Director's Apartments in Van Meter 
North, Baker House and Mils House in 
accordance with the following schedule, 
effective September 1, 1964: 



1. Van Meter North 

Head of Resident Apartment 

2. Baker House 

Area Director's Apartment 

3. Falls House 

Area Director's Apartment 



$30 per month inc. 
utilities 

$30 per month inc. 
utilities 

$30 per month inc. 
utilities 



Discussion followed on the recommendation for daily 
conference rates to be established for the "Orchard Hill" 
residence halls. Upon motion being made and duly seconded, it 
was unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they recommend to the University 
Building Authority the establishment, 
effective September 1, 1964, of daily 
conference rates for the "Orchard Hill" 
residence halls in accordance with the 
following schedule: 



2559 



Apartment 
Rental Rates: 
Van Meter 
North, Baker 
and Mills 
Houses 



Overnight 
Conference 
Rental Rates 



2560 



COMMITTEE 



Naming of 

Dining 

Facilities 



Naming of 
Project IT 
Dormitories 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

1. $1.00 per bed per person for all youth group . 

2. $1.50 per "bed per person for all other conferences. 

3. $1.50 per bed per person for University of 

Massachusetts Alumni groups. 

Treasurer Johnson reported to the committee that Dear 
Field had requested that the names North Commons and South Commons 
be given to the dining facilities located in these respective 
areas on the east side of the campus. After brief discussion, and 
upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that it rename the existing dining 
commons the North Commons and to name 
the new dining hall located between 
French and Fernald Halls the South 
Commons . 

The Treasurer made the suggestion that the Project II 
dormitories might be taiov/n as the Orchard Dormitories, and that 
they might be named individually after leading literary figures 
who have been associated historically with the Town of Amherst. 
It was suggested further that future buildings might be named for 
other leading Massachusetts historical figures in the fields of 
letters and science. The committee agreed to carry this matter ove 
to the next meeting for further discussion. 

The Treasurer reported to the committee, that due to the 
schedule for completion of the "Orchard Hill" dormitories, the 
University would find it necessary to move students into these 
buildings prior to the Buildings and Grounds Committee having had 
an opportunity to inspect them. The conclusion was that, under 
existing conditions, this departure from normal procedure would 
be acceptable out of necessity. 

There being no further business, the meeting was 
adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 




i 







Robert^'. McCar&ney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



J 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

September 3, 1964, 10:00 a.m., President's Office, U of M, Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Schuck; Trustees Crowley, 
Plimpton and Troy; Provost Tippo, 
Dr. Venman, Secretary McCartney. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Deans Moore, Lindsey, Maher, 

Niederpruem; Associate Dean 

Wagner and Assistant Dean 

Bischoff ; Professors Brogan, 

Gluckstern, Niedeck, Beth, 

Esselen and Lundberg. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Dean Moore of the 
Graduate School presented supporting material in behalf of a pro- 
posal from the Department of Physics requesting approval for 
establishment of a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Physics. The 
proposal included a request for approval of the establishment of a 
Four-College Cooperative Ph.D. offering running parallel to the 
University of Massachusetts program. Dr. Gluckstern, new head of 
the Department of Physics, was introduced to the committee and 
added his support to the proposal. After discussion, it was moved, 
seconded and unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Department of Physics be authorized to 
offer a Doctor of Philosophy degree in 
Physics, and that a Four-College Cooperative 
Ph.D. degree in Physics be approved as an 
offering running parallel to the University 
of Massachusetts program. (Document 65-015) 

Professor Arthur E, Niedeck, head of the Department of 
Speech, appeared before the committee in support of a request by 
the Speech Department to participate in the Master of Fine Arts 
program by offering a graduate major in Dramatic Art. Professor 
Niedeck noted that the Master of Fine Arts degree was approved last 
year for the English Department for a major in Creative Writing, 
and for the Art Department for a major in Art. Dean Moore of the 
Graduate School expressed his concurrence with the request. 
Discussion followed after which it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the Speech Department be authorized to offer 
a graduate major in Dramatic Art leading to 
the Master of Fine Arts degree. (Document 
65-016) 



2561 



Ph.D. in 
Physics with 
Parallel 
Four-College 
Cooperative 
Ph.D. Program 



Master of 
Fine Arts in 
Dramatic Art 



:562 



COMMITTi 



English for 

Foreign 

Students 



Metropolitan 

Politics 

Course 

Credit Change: 
Mathematics 
5 and 6 



New 

Graduate 

Courses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In the absence of Dean Hunsberger at an out-of-state 
conference, Associate Dean Wagner outlined three curricula changes 
within the College of Arts and Sciences which the College requested 
to become effective in September, 1964. 

Professor Brogan, head of the Department of English, ex- 
plained a proposed modification in the course entitled, ENGLISH FOR 
FOREIGN STUDENTS, which would extend it from one semester to a full 
academic year. 

Professor Beth of the Government Department gave support- 
ing reasons for a proposed course in METROPOLITAN POLITICS to be 
substituted for an existing course in MUNICIPAL LAW (Government 80) . 

Associate Dean Wagner explained the request of the School 
of Engineering for a change in credit for MATHEMATICS 5 and 6 from 
four to three. 

After appropriate discussion of the curricula changes pro- 
posed within the College of Arts and Sciences, it was moved, 
seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
a modification of the course entitled 
ENGLISH FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS, extend- 
ing it from one semester to a full 
academic year. (Document 65-017) 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the substitution of a course in 
METROPOLITAN POLITICS in the Govern- 
ment Department for an existing course 
in MUNICIPAL LAW (Government 80). 
(Document 65-017) 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
a change in credit in the Department 
of Mathematics for MATHEMATICS 5 and 
6 from four to three. (Document 65-017) 

Dean Moore introduced a request for the approval of two 
courses in History, two in Home Economics, and one in Plant and Soil 
Sciences. After extensive discussion, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
VOTED : - approve new graduate courses in the 
Department of History as follows: 
(Document 65-018) 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF 



1ASSACHUSETTS 



EUROPEAN HISTORIOGRAPHY TO THE ENLIGHTENMENT 
(History 701 - 224) 

EUROPEAN HISTORIOGRAPHY, THE ENLIGHTENMENT 
TO THE PRESENT (History 702 - 225) 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
approval of the following graduate course 
in Plant and Soil Sciences: (Document 65-018) 

MORPHOLOGY OF ECONOMIC PLANTS (Plant and 
Soil Sciences 710 - 206) 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 

VOTED : To refer hack to the University for further 
study the following proposed graduate courses 
in Home Economics: (Document 65-018) 

FASHION IN THE ECONCMY (Home Economics 
TCEA 701 - 201) 

CLOTHING AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR (Home Economics 
TCEA 702 - 202) 

Dean Lindsey of the College of Engineering appeared before 
the committee in behalf of proposed changes in the Engineering 
curriculum which would have the effect of replacing ENGINEERING 
DRAWING (M.E. 1 and 2) by two new courses. 

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS (Engineering 3-1) and 

ENGINEERING PROBLEMS (Engineering 4 - II) 

The proposal called for dropping M.E. 1 completely; but M.E. 2 would 
be retained for Civil and Mechanical Engineering majors and others 
who might wish to gain more proficiency in drawing. 

Additionally, it was proposed to lower hours and credits 
from 4 to 3 in the following courses: 

MATHEMATICS 5 (I and II - Introductory 
Engineering Mathematics) and 

MATHEMATICS 6 (I and II - Introductory 
Calculus for Engineering) 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 



2563 



Changes in 
School of 
Engineering 
Curriculum 



2564 



COMMITTEE 



Changes in 
Nursing 
Course 
Titles 



Proposed 
Changes in 
Home 

Economics 
Curriculum 



New Course 
in Restaurant 
and Hotel 
Management 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of changes in the curriculum 
of the School of Engineering as 
described above and outlined in the 
attached supporting material. 
(Document 65-010) 

Dean Maher of the School of Nursing presented supporting 
comment in behalf of a series of proposed changes in the titles of 
courses in the School of Nursing. After brief discussion, it was 
moved, seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the changes in course titles in the 
School of Nursing as proposed in the 
attached supporting material. 
(Document 65-011) 

A proposed series of course deletions, course additions 
and minor course changes in the School of Home Economics were out- 
lined by Dean Niederpruem. Lengthy discussion followed, and it was 
moved, seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the following new course be 
approved in the School of Home Economics. 

INTRODUCTION TO HOME ECONOMICS (HEEd. 120 - 
20) Credit 1. 

After further consideration, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 

VOTED : That all other course proposals of the 
School of Home Economics, as contained 
in Document 65-012 be referred back to 
the University for further study. 

Professors Esselen and Lundberg appeared before the 
committee in support of a request to offer a new course in the fall 
of 1964 in the Restaurant and Hotel Management Program. It was 
moved, seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the addition in the fall of 1964 in 
the Restaurant and Hotel Management 
Program, the following course: 
(Document 65-019) 

HOTEL SALES AND PROMOTION (II RHM 84) 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In the absence of Dean McGuirk, Assistant Dean Bischoff 
responded to questions of the committee members concerning a pro- 
posal of the School of Physical Education to change from 2 to 3 
credits a course entitled Prevention and Care of Athletic Injury 
(Physical Education 75). Discussion followed and it was moved, 
seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the following course in the School 
of Physical Education be changed from 
2 to 3 credits: 
(Document 65-013) 

PREVENTION AND CARE OF ATHLETIC INJURY 
(Physical Education 75) 

At 1:30 p.m. the Committee adjourned to the Student Union 
for lunch. 

Provost Tippo opened his remarks at the luncheon with the 
report that the University of Massachusetts had received approval 
by the Phi Beta Kappa society for the establishment of a chapter on 
the campus in Amherst. 

The Provost invited members of the Committee to submit 
nominees from graduates of recent years who could be recommended to 
the White House for consideration as appointees to important Federal 
posts, either at the White House or in key agencies in Washington, 
D.C. 

The Provost gave a detailed outline of procedure currently 
employed in the recruitment of new members of the faculty. He 
enumerated several difficulties involved in recruitment of outstand- 
ing faculty. 

Following this, discussion centered on means of control- 
ling the proliferation of courses, and the Provost introduced a pro- 
posed Course Request Form. 

Discussion followed on a recommendation to hold a seminar 
involving members of the Board Committee on Faculty and Program of 
Study and University Deans of Colleges and Schools to explore and 
discuss the following questions: 

1. Balance between general education and pro- 

fessional courses. 

2. Proliferation of courses. 

3. Criteria for judging new courses. 

\ 
There was unanimous agreement, and the Provost was in- 
structed to work with the Secretary in setting a date for a Seminar 
involving committee members and Deans of Colleges and Schools 
approximately two weeks prior to the October 24 meeting of the full 
Board of Trustees. 



2565 



Change in 
Course in 
Physical 
Education 



Phi Beta 

Kappa 

Chanter 



2566 



COMMITTEE 



Faculty 
Senate 



Task 

Force 

Report 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After brief discussion and review, it was moved, 
seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the approval of changes in the wording 
of the Constitution of the University 
of Massachusetts Faculty Senate as pro- 
posed in the attached Report of the 
Faculty Senate Committee on the Con- 
stitution as amended by the Faculty 
Senate and the University Faculty, and 
recommended by the President for Trustee 
approval. (Document 65-014 ) 

A report followed on the progress of the University of 
Massachusetts-Boston Task Force given by Director of Planning 
Cadigan and Dean of Administration Redfern. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:40 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees) 




COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
September 9, 1964, 10:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Emerson and Schuck; 
Provost Tippo, Treasurer Johnson, 
Dean Rsdfern, Secretary McCartney 



At the invitation of the Chairman, President Lederle ex- 
plained that the purpose of the meeting was to conduct interviews 
with representatives of a number of architectural firms recommended 
by Mr, Belluschi. He expressed the hope that members of the 
committee would thereby become more familiar with the particular 
style of these architects as reflected in representative examples 
of their work, and come to understand their philosophy of design 
and construction, as brought out during the interviews. 

Accordingly, after due explanation by Chairman Haigis to 
each architect interviewee that the University is engaged in a 
tremendous program of expansion involving the new Medical School, 
U. Mass-Boston and a number of major upcoming projects on the campus 
in Amherst, representatives of the following architectural firms 
were interviewed for periods of approximately 20 to 30 minutes: 



Architectural Firm 

The Architects Collaborative Inc. 

Kallmann & McKinnell 

Anderson, Beckwith & Haible 



Representatives 
Messrs. Thompson & Fletcher 
Messrs. Kallmann & McKinnell 
Mr. Haible 



The Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc. Messrs. Paul Dietrich & Peter 

Chermayeff 
L. Roy Webber Associates, Inc. Mr. L. Roy Webber 

At the conclusion of interviews with the above repre- 
sentatives of architectural firms, Treasurer Johnson stated that he 
had received a letter from Mr. Pei expressing regrets and in- 
S dicating that he would have been present today if at all possible. 
Mr. Pei indicated that he was quite interested in doing work for 
the University. The Treasurer then quoted from a letter received 
from Mr. Belluschi listing additional architects whose work was of 
sufficiently high quality to be of interest to the committee. 

The Chairman read without comment a letter from 
Mr. Britton of Greenfield indicating that he had continued interest 
in performing architectural assignments for the University. 



2567 



2568 



COMMITTEE 



Orchard 

Hill 

Dormitories 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson noted that Commissioner Waldron ex- 
pected to receive a recommendation from the Board of Trustees pro- 
posing architects who might be considered for assignment to the 
addition to the School of Education and to the Continuing Education 
Center. The Treasurer indicated that the Commissioner would not 
name an architect on any University project who had not received 
approval by the Board of Trustees. After due discussion, it was 
decided to hold another meeting of the committee sometime before 
the end of September at which time a roster of three architects 
for each of the above named projects would be selected and for- 
warded to Commissioner Waldron' s office. 

President Lederle urged that recommendations on archi- 
tects be forwarded to the full Board of Trustees for their approval 
at the meeting of October 24. 

Trustee Schuck suggested that the list of interviewees 
include Weese of Chicago; also Breuer and Franzen of New York. 

After due discussion and upon motion being duly made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the new high-rise dormitories being opened 
to students this September in the northeast 
quadrant of the campus and known as the 
Orchard Hill complex be named after 
distinguished American writers who had re- 
sided in the Town of Amherst as follows: 

Emily Dickinson 
Eugene Field 
David Grayson 
Noah Webster 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:43 P.m. 



Respectfully submitted 

L 




Robert J. McCartney 



Secretary 



. Mcc^a 



ard of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
September 23, 1964, 10:00 a.m., President's Office, UofM, Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Emerson and Schuck; 
Provost Tippo, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney 

Chairman Haigis opened the meeting by explaining its main 
purposes as follows: 

1. To interview out-of-state architects as 
continuing business from the prior meet- 
ing of the committee on September 9, 1964 

2. To view a scheduled presentation on the 
Fine Arts Building by Saarinen Associates 
at 2:00 p.m. along with members of the 
University Master Planning Committee 

Treasurer Johnson advised the committee that architect 
Weese would arrive from Chicago at approximately 4:00 p.m. He also 
indicated that architects Breuer and Franzen had been delayed en 
route. 

Treasurer Johnson reported on a brief visit he made to 
Nantucket. He disclosed that Dr. & Mrs. Folger who own property 
adjacent to the Peabody Estate are willing to give to the University 
17 acres of land to complete University holdings in this area. 

President Lederle reported on progress of final con- 
struction details in the Orchard Hill dormitory complex and South 
Dining Commons. Treasurer Johnson added many details to the 
discussion and indicated that the President had sent a letter to 
Commissioner Waldron stressing the necessity of improving coordina- 
tion on projects involving State Funds and those of the University 
Building Authority. 

The Treasurer continued with a progress report on the 
Stadium site. Provost Tippo observed that the committee should 
give consideration to raising priority on the Machmer Building Tower 
in order to provide needed faculty office space. It was agreed that 
the committee would give attention to this matter within a few 
months . 



Chairman Haigis welcomed Mr. Marcel Breuer, and explained 
the scope of University expansion and development in the years ahead. 
The committee proceeded with an extensive interview involving 
Mr. Breuer' s experience and background, philosophy of architecture 
and the display of examples of his work. Treasurer Johnson showed a 
slide of the University's Master Plan. Discussion continued until 
the committee adjourned for lunch in the Student Union at 12:10 p.m. 



2569 



Purpose 
of the 
Meeting 



Nantucket 
Property 



Construction 

Progress 

Reports 



Breuer 
Interview 



2570 



COMMITTEE 



Fine Arts 
Building 



Franzen & 

Weese 

Interviews 



Preferred 
Architects , 
Library 
Addition 



Preferred 

Architects, 

Continuing 

Education 

Center 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Following lunch, the committee attended a presentation 
by Saarinen Associates on plans for the new Fine Arts Building. 

Following the presentation and after due discussion, it 
was moved, seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that preliminary plans for the Fine 
Arts Building as presented by Saarinen 
Associates be approved and accepted. 

At approximately 3:20 p.m., the committee reconvened in 
the President's Office to interview Mr. Ulrich Franzen of New York 
City. 

Following this an extensive interview was conducted with 
Mr. Harry Weese of Chicago. 

At the conclusion of the interviews, the committee 
deliberated on recommending a priority list of architects for each 
of the following projects: The Library, the Continuing Education 
Center and the Addition to the School of Education. 



mously 



After due discussion, it was moved, seconded and unani- 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the Board recommend to Commissioner 
Waldron the following architects, listed 
in order of preference for the Library: 

1. Harry Weese 

2. Marcel Breuer 

3. Kallmann & McKinnell 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the Board recommend to Commissioner 
Waldron the following architects, listed 
in order of preference, for the Continuing 
Education Center: 

1. Marcel Breuer 

2. Harry Weese 

3. Kallmann & McKinnell 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the Board recommend to Commissioner 
Waldron the following architects, listed 
in order of preference, for the Addition 
to the School of Education: 

1. Ben Thompson - The Architects Collaborative 

2. Anderson, Beckwith & Haible 

3. Ulrich Franzen 

The meeting adjourned at 6:20 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted, 



/ 




(in U 





• ,- i (■ 



Robert J. /McCartney- 7 
Secretary, Board of Trustee's 



2571 



Preferred 
Architects , 
School of 
Education 
Addition 



2572 



COMMITTEE 



These are not official minutes. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



REPORT OF MEETING OF MEMBERS OF THE TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY WITH DEANS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

October 13, 1964, 12 Noon, Dukes Room, Student Union, Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Schuck, President Lederle; 
Trustees Lyons and Troy; Provost 
Tippo, Secretary McCartney. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Deans Hunsberger, Kirshen, 

Lindsey, Maher, McGuirk, Moore, 

Niederpruem, Purvis and 

Spielman; Associate Dean 

Jeffrey and Assistant to the 

Provost, Venman. 

At no time during the meeting was a quorum present. 

In the temporary absence of the Chairman, Provost Tippo 
restated that the main purpose of the meeting was to bring our 
academic Deans together with members of the Trustee Committee on 
Faculty and Program of Study for the purpose of exploring certain 
problems including the balance between general education and pro- 
fessional courses, the proliferation of courses and the criteria for 
judging new courses. 

There followed a series of reports on the course balances 
in each of the schools and colleges, with the exception of the 
College of Arts and Sciences whose program was to be taken up at 
a future meeting. 

In each case the Dean distributed supporting material 
amplifying the points made in discussion. 

At the conclusion of the presentation of the reports, the 
President reported that the University had been designated as the 
institution of higher learning in the Commonwealth for administra- 
tion of the Water Resources Development Program. 

Pending finalization of detailed plans of administration, 
the members of the committee present indicated their interest and 
their approval of this designation. 

The President stated that he would present to the full 
Board of Trustees on October 24 the name of Governor John Anderson 
of Kansas with the request that he be designated as Visiting 
Distinguished Professor of Public Affairs for the Spring Semester 



2573 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1964-65. The committee members indicated their approval of the 
recommendation. 



The meeting adjourned at 3:10 p.m. 



Respectfully submitted, 

/ / / ■ 

i-i- , M 

Robert J. MoCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



1 i , ,. 



MEETING OF AD HOC COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD TO WORK WITH 

WITH BOSTON TASK FORCE 

November 5, 1964, 12:30 p.m., Parker House, Boston, Mass, 



PRESENT : Trustees I^yons, Troy, Fox, Brown, 

President Lederle, Treasurer Johnson, 
Dean of Administration Redfern, 
Messrs. Brand, Venman, Cadigan, 
Hugill, Secretary McCartney 

Upon recommendation of the Chairman, it was moved, 
seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : That the meeting go into executive session 
for the purpose of discussing the Heller 
Associates report. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:45 p.m. 



Respectfully submitted, 




\ ■ ■ . 



tJjr^J^C 






Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



2574 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



REPORT OF MEETING OF MEMBERS OF THE TRUSTEE COMMITTEE 
ON FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

November 10, 1964, 12:4-5 p.m., Dukes Room, Student Union, Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Schuck; Provost Tippo, 
Assistant to the Provost Venman, 
Associate Dean Wagner, Secretary's 
Staff Assistant Miller (Secretary 
McCartney was in Washington, D.C. 
attending a national conference 
of the Association of State Uni- 
versities and Land Grant Colleges) 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION : 



Professors Richason, Little, 
Taylor, Smith, Anderson and 
Strother; Associate Professors 
King and Greenfield; Instructor 
Stromgren. 



AT NO TIME DURING THE MEETING WAS A QUORUM PRESENT. 

Full discussion of the proposed curricular changes was 
conducted by Chairman Schuck. These changes, approved by the 
Curriculum Committee and the Faculty of the College of Arts and 
Sciences, were outlined by Associate Dean Wagner. Supporting 
comment was given by Faculty members in the areas covered. 



A. Associate Professor King of the School of Nursing 
appeared before the committee in support of a request by the School 
of Nursing for the addition of an elementary course in Biochemistry, 
primarily for Nursing students, Chemistry 71 (120). Professor King 
noted that development of a course in Biochemistry which does not 
have a pre-requisite in organic chemistry would better serve the 
needs of Nursing students. Professor Richason expressed his con- 
currence and said in the first year Chemistry 71 (120) would be re- 
stricted to Nursing students, but if valid interest were shown, it 
vrould be open to other students. It was also noted that Chemistry 
71 would not be a terminal course nor a prerequisite to any other 
chemistry course; and there vrould be no change in total hours 
offered Nursing students but rather an attempt to give the students 
a redistribution of content. Professor Little, also appearing in 
support, said a text is available, and Professor Gawienowski vrould 
teach the course. 

B. Mr. Stromgren of the Department of Speech explained 
the proposal of the addition of a one-semester course in film — 
Speech 65 (225) History of Film. He said silent-era movies will be 
studied along with documentary and experimental films; that the 
course has validity because of the increasing interest shown in the 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

film industry and the need for strengthening the art of filming. 
He noted that more than 40 colleges and universities offer similar 
courses, and a bibliography has been prepared. Mr. Stromgren read 
excerpts from a newsclipping from the New York Sunday Times which 
emphasized that the films of today needed more study on the 
academic level. Mr. Stromgren also presented a memorandum from 
Professor Niedeck on the status of the Master of Fine Arts program. 



C. Associate Dean Wagner discussed the proposed addition 
of Japanese 7 (107), 8 (108) which would provide instruction 
through the proficiency level — if the course is offered at all. 
He said that interest by students in such a course must be studied 
and evaluated. The availability of a teacher was discussed. 
Chairman Schuck recommended that use of Asian-African funds be in- 
vestigated as a means of establishing the course in Japanese. 
Middle-eastern and Chinese- language courses ?rere discussed briefly. 



D. Associate Professor Greenfield of the Department of 
Romance Languages (Spanish) and Professor Taylor, head of the De- 
partment of Romance Languages, gave supporting comment on a series 
of one-credit courses in Spanish grammar, composition and con- 
versation which would be intended primarily for Spanish majors 
preparing to teach Spanish. Professor Greenfield noted that these 
one-credit courses would help strengthen the language experience 
for students majoring in Spanish. He also said: all classes are 
taught in Spanish to develop comprehension; there are 80 majors in 
Spanish, and native- language teachers would work with students in 
laboratory courses. Professor Taylor explained that this would 
not necessitate an increase in staff beyond normal development. 
There was discussion on the number of French majors, the faculty 
teaching French, and administration of the Department of Romance 
Languages. 



E. A change in description and credit for Geology 56 
(220), Lithology, was given supporting comment by Professor Smith, 
who noted: changing the course to four hours would serve to 
balance and modernize it. Rather than expand this into a one-year 
course, it was felt the four-hour course would provide the student 
with sufficient background to work individually in studying rocks. 
Professor Smith described a new course in field work — Geo3.ogy 388 — 
as a course to be offered in the summer with at least one week of 
full-time work per credit. Professor Smith said the Geology De- 
partment is cooperating with Western Massachusetts towns in 
attempting to solve geologic problems, and that long-range planning 
calls for more work in the fields of ground-water geology, in- 
dustrial mineralogy and engineering geology. 



F, In the Department of Economics, the proposal for 
addition of a new course, Economics 82 (282) (II) Urban Economics, 
was withdrawn at this time. 



2575 



--— 



:576 



COMMITTEE 



UNSVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



G. Reorganization of Mathematics 2 and 22 into 
Mathematics 18 (112) Finite Mathematics and Mathematics 19 (113) 
Survey of Calculus were commented upon by Associate Dean Wagner and 
Professor Anderson. Total coverage will be the same after re- 
organizing Mathematics 2 and 22 into Mathematics IB (112) and 
Mathematics 19 (113), avoiding duplication between Mathematics 2 
and Statistics 21; there would be no increase in courses or credits, 
and the reorganization would better fit the text book situation. 
Professor Anderson noted that it is much easier to transfer in the 
sequences, and that the course was developed for students in 
Business Administration, Economics and the social sciences. 

Following the meeting with faculty members, Professor 
Wayman L. Strother, head of the Department of Mathematics, met with 
the committee to give an appraisal and discuss the future of his 
department . 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:50 p.m. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Alan R. Miller 

Staff Assistant 

Office of the Secretary 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



2577 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

November 13, 1964, 12:30 p.m., Suffolk Room, Student Union, U of M 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Emerson, Schuck and 
Thompson; Provost Tippo, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney 

Following lunch in the Student Union, the meeting was 
convened in the President's Office at 1:15 p.m. At the suggestion 
of Chairman Haigis, the first item on the agenda, "Approval of 
Plans and Specifications", was postponed until the arrival of 
Trustee Schuck. 

The Treasurer called to the attention of the Committee 
the provisions of changes in the eminent domain statutes which were 
passed during the recent legislative session. Among these re- 
visions is a requirement that prompt and realistic payment be made 
for property taken by eminent domain. As a party receiving a pro 
tanto payment may accept it either as a pro tanto or as a full pay- 
ment, a change in Board of Trustees policy which established a 
60^ pro tanto payment is deemed necessary. After general 
discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
rescind its vote of November 22, 1963 
which established a policy to authorize 
pro tanto payments up to 60^ of the 
average of all appraised values made on 
property being taken by eminent domain 
by the University. 

Upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the intent and purpose of recent 
changes in the eminent domain statutes 
also be followed with respect to Uni- 
versity land acquisition cases now pend- 
ing but which were initiated prior to 
the effective date of such statutory 
changes . 

The Treasurer next discussed the recommendation of the 
Master Planning Committee that all of the Gilbert Woodside property 
be acquired. This is also the recommendation of Sasaki Walker and 
Associates who have studied the area of approximately 7 acres south 
of the southwest dormitory area. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 



Pro Tanto 
Payments 



2578 



COMMITTEE 



Gilbert 
Woods ide 
property 



Amendments 
to Traffic 
Rules and 
Regulations 



Bringing 

Utilities to 

University 

Building 

Authority 

Construction 

Projects 



Archi tec tural 
Study - 
Boston Site 
Buildings 



UNSVERS1TY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that all of the Gilbert Woodside 
property adjacent to the southwest 
dormitory complex and to the west of 
Sunset Avenue be acquired and that 
Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer of the 
University, be authorized to negotiate 
with Dr. Gilbert Woodside concerning 
a settlement figure agreeable mutually 
to the University and the owner. 

The Treasurer distributed copies of a proposed amendment 
to the University Automobile Regulations dated June 6, 1964. The 
Treasurer pointed out that the section on Registration Fees would 
require revision in light of an opinion of the Attorney General 
dated July 1, 1964- and comments on this opinion by the law firm of 
Ely, Bartlett, Brown and Proctor who recommend that the Trustees 
delete registration fees as such and sell the identification 
insignia and traffic rules and regulations instead at the University 
Store. After general discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the Automobile Regulations dated 
June 6, 1964 be amended as follows: 

a. Delete Section 6 
Article VII. 

b. Renumber Section 7, 
Article VII as Section 6. 

Treasurer Johnson next outlined problems of coordination 
between the State Bureau of Building Cons taction, the University 
Building Authority contractors and the University proper in the 
matter of bringing utilities to service these projects at the 
appropriate time. 

The time sequence for utility services to the southwest 
dormitories is now as follows: 

1. Water and sewer to be installed by May 15, 1965 

2. Steam to be installed by May 15, 1965 

3. Electricity to be installed by May 15, 1965 

The Treasurer next reported that the full Board of 
Trustees will receive the report of Heller Associates detailing 
their investigation and recommendations concerning appropriate sites 
for the University of Massachusetts/Boston at the next meeting on 
November 19. 

The Treasurer recommended Drummey-Rosane-Anderson, archi- 
tects to make a feasibility study on renovations for four 
prospective Boston building sites. After brief discussion, it was 

moved, seconded and unanimously 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the Board authorize the buildings 
renovation feasibility study by Drummey- 
Rosane-Anderson and to confirm them as 
architects for the study in accordance 
with their proposal on file with the 
Treasurer. 

At the suggestion of the Chairman, the Committee next 
considered the first item on the agenda which had been previously 
deferred. Preliminary plans for specifications for the Addition 
to Bartlett Hall were presented by Messrs, Coletti and Doland. 
After brief review and discussion, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the preliminary plans and 
specifications for the Addition to 
Bartlett Hall as presented by Messrs. 
Coletti and Doland. 

It was further 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the acceptance of preliminary plans 
and specifications for the Graduate 
Research Center. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the preliminary plans and 
specifications for the Agricultural 
Engineering Service Building be 
accepted. 

It was also 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that final plans for the renovation of 
Goessmann Laboratory be accepted. 

It was also 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they accept, subject to the 
availability of funds, the final plans 
for renovation of the Poultry Research 
Building. 



2579 



Plans and 

Specifications 

Approval 



Addition to 
Bartlett Hall 



Graduate 
Research 
Center 



Agricultural 
Engineering 
Service 
Building 



Renovation o^ 
Older Build- 
ings 

Goessmann 
Laboratory 

Poultry 

Research 
B"ilding 



:580 



COMMITTEE 



Preservation 
of Early 
Buildings 



S+Of-k'hridge 
House 



Old 

Physics 

Building 



Homestead 



Date for 
Next Mee+ing 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Discussion followed upon the desirability of preserving 
certain early campus buildings. Considered were: 

1. Old Physics Building 

2. Stockbridge House 

3. Homestead 

Chairman Haigis read to the Committee letters received 
from Dr. C. A. Peters and from Trustee Louis Lyons in support of 
preserving these structures as a part of the University heritage. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the Stockbridge House was 
the oldest house in Amherst, and that administrative sentiment had 
always been in favor of retaining this structure. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that Stockbridge House be preserved 
and maintained as a part of the Uni- 
versity's historical herita . 

Discussion followed on the Old Physics Building. The 
Treasurer reported that this building had been scheduled for re- 
moval. Chairman Haigis suggested that the question of preserving 
the Old Physics Building be referred to the Campus Planning 
Committee with the request that they convey to the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds their views and recommendations. 

Further discussion followed on the 1 Homestead. It was 
noted that this structure, rebuilt many years ago, was one of the 
original farm buildings acquired by the University when the acreage 
was converted from farm land to campus. It was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the Homestead be preserved and 
maintained as a part of the University's 
historical heritage and that, if 
necessary, it be relocated to another 
appropriate part of the campus in the 
event that the present site be utilized 
for other campus buildings. 

After brief discussion, it was agreed that the next meet- 
ing of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds would take place in 
the President's Office, South College, at 10:30 a.m. on December 3, 
1964. 

The meeting adjourned at 3:4Q'p>rn. 



Respectfully supitWd, 



RoMrt J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 




I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COIMITIEE 

November 19, 1964, 10:30 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Trustees Crowley, Fox, Healey, Plimpton 
and Pumphret; President Lederle, Provost 
Tippo, Treasurer Johnson, Dean Redfern, 
Secretary McCartney 

In the absence of the Chairman, Trustee Healey acted as 
chairman pro tem and indicated that the main business of the meet- 
ing was to consider nominations for honorary degrees at Commence- 
ment, 1965. 

It was duly moved, seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To go into Executive session for the purpose of 
considering nominations for honorary degrees at 
Commencement, 1965. 

Following the consideration of nominations for honorary 
degrees, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To come out of executive session for the purpose 
of considering other business. 

Treasurer Johnson reported to the Committee that due to 
the necessity of employing people on a part-time and temporary 
basis rather than on a permanent basis in order to increase in 
enrollment, it was necessary to transfer the sum of $1,030,000 
from Account 01 - Salaries, Permanent Positions to the 02 and 03 
accounts. The transfer breakdown follows: 



From: 



01 - Salaries, Permanent Positions $1,030,000 



To: 



02 - Salaries, Temporary Positions 

03 - Services, Non-employees 



500,000 
530.000 

$1,030,000 



These transfers were made to adjust the appropriation to 
actual payroll requirements. 

President Lederle outlined briefly the intention of the 
University to file legislation in the forthcoming session for 
the purpose of raising certain salary ceiling levels. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12*3% p.m. 



tfrL?u J- 






Respectfully su^mi^ted-^ , 

' -ill (^ 

Robert J. McCartney ^- 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 




2580-A 



Budget 
Transfers - 
Subsidiary 
Accounts 



■Salary 

Ceiling 

Increases 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



i 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY 

AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

December 3, 1964, 1:35 p.m., Dukes Room, Student Union, Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Schuck, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Haigis, Plimpton 
and Troy; Provost Tippo, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney; 



BY INVITATION: 



Dr. Venman, Assistant to the 
Provost . 



At the invitation of Chairman Schuck, Provost Tippo re- 
viewed details of his memorandum dated November 24 to President 
Lederle on the subject of Selective Annual Merit Increments 
(Document 65-028). 

In essence, this memorandum proposed that the following 
increments be used as a guide for the indicated ranks, fluctuating 
as necessary to fit the general salary schedule: 



Instructor 
Assistant Professor 
Associate Professor 
Professor 






400 

600 

800 

1,000 



Chairman Schuck invited the President to comment on the 
proposal and Dr. Lederle observed that no personnel system can be 
operated without provision for growth and recognition of meritorious 
performance . 

The President stated that most departments now have a 
system whereby the department head works with a personnel committee 
in determining eligibility for merit increases. Although persons 
not receiving an increment may always be expected to object, the 
President noted that the new procedure for recommendation should re- 
duce such instances to the absolute minimum. 

Provost Tippo observed that the money would be allocated 
to the various departments by percentage based on the current size 
of their salary budgets. The President stated that, in 1962, a 
salary increment ceiling level of approximately $1200 to $1300 was 
established for any individual faculty member. 

The Chairman inquired whether the new salary classifica- 
tions are required to be taken up with the Division of Personnel and 
Standardization. It was indicated that, in due course, personnel 
authorities at the state level would be informed as appropriate, 



2581 



Selective 
Annual 
Merit 
Increments 



&>z)0/& 



COMMITTEE 



UNiVERSlTY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The President observed that, if it were necessary to raise 
salary ceilings for the position of Professor above the present 
level of $18,900, a recommendation to this effect would be brought 
into the meeting of the Committee in Janua - : 

The President discussed the pros and cons of distributing 
funds available for salary increments on a "flat" basis as 
distinguished from increments awarded on a merit basis. He indi- 
cated that the allocations this year would be on a straight merit 
basis. He added that increments might be distributed on a "fie 
basis in some other year. 

The Provost stated that the Departments and the Administration 
need flexibility in handling merit increases. He noted that some 
increments might be given below the proposed scale minimum, while 
others might be granted above the proposed $1,000 veiling. The 
latter might prove necessary, for example, in order to hold an out- 
standing faculty member who had been given an attractive outside 
offer. 

Discussion followed on the general objective of the Ad- 
ministration to establish an annual increment potential for faculty 
between 3j% and 6%, This is considered necessary in order to carry 
on effective recruitment and to keep up with the average national 
increase . 

Chairman Schuck queried when the schedule of proposed in- 
crements for individuals would be reported to the Board. The 
Provost responded that the report would be presented in January. 

The President and the Provost discussed a form presented to 
the faculty entitled, "Annual Faculty Report on Scholarly, Pro- 
fessional and University Activities". The form covers activity 
for a given calendar year. Effort is being made to get the faculty 
member to set down everything which he feels is of merit concern- 
ing his activity. Deans and Department Heads are being urged to 
develop a tighter and better set of criteria for evaluating their 
faculty. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the proposals for awarding Se- 
lective Annual Merit Increments to the 
faculty as detailed in Document 65-028 
be adopted. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Chairman queried when the Committee would receive 
the proposed curriculum for the University of Massachusetts/Boston. 
The Provost indicated that this would be available soon, and 
Dr. venman added that the curriculum, essentially, would be the 
curriculum of the freshman year in Arts and Sciences at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts/Amherst. 



The meeting was adjourned at 2:05 p.m. 



Respectfully submitted, 



J ^w I 







4*d>U 



Robert Jy McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



2583 






2584 



COMMITTEE 



Stone & 
Webster Re- 
port on 
Electric Heat 
for High Rise 
Dormitories 

Project 6 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

December 3, 1964, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, South College 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, Trustees Brown, 
Emerson and Schuck; President 
Lederle, Provost Tippo, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Director of Physical Plant 
Hugill; Messrs. White and 
Nordbeck of Stone & Webst 



The Chairman introduced Messrs. White and Nordbeck of 
Stone & Webster. Discussion followed on a report prepared by 
Stone & Webster entitled "Comparison of Steam VS. Electric Costs 
for Heating Three High Rise Dormitories". (Summarized in Document 
65-031 attached) The effect of the Stone & Webster cost study was 
to show that the grand total annual cost including amortizir 
capital costs of operating three high rise dormitories on an All 
Steam versus All Electric basis was $19,910 higher on an All 
Electric basis. Construction cost for all three total electric 
buildings would be an extra $166,300. 

A similar grand total annual cost differential on the 
basis of All Steam versus 2 Steam, 1 Electric amounted to $7,700 
additional cost for the latter alternate. Of this less than half 
is the cost of power. The extra construction cost to the 
Authority for one electrically heated building is $73,550. 

Discussion followed and Mr. White stated that it was not 
the position of Stone & Webster to make a recommendation; rather, 
they were simply presenting the results of their analysis for 
evaluation by the Committee. He emphasized that the comparison is 
based on a steam-hot water system where the student had no control 
over the temperature in his room versus a first-class electric 
system with thermostats in every ro' 

In response to questioning, Mr. White outlined a few 
advantages afforded by the All-Electric system as folic 

1. Reduction of waste through heat 
loss from the opening of windows. 

2. Additional room comforts secured 
through individual thermostatic 
control. 

3. Increased cleanliness (applicable 
only where heating plant is v/ithin 
the same building) . 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Hugill cited a Pennsylvania study on electric heat 
in which the research professors made the blanket assumption that 
only 60 to 80 percent effectiveness in heat transfer is secured 
in using steam. the heat transfer effectiveness 
utilizing electricity is 98 percent effective. 

Mr. Nordbeck made the observation that the cost of 
electric energy is going down, whereas the cost of other forms of 
energy appears to be going up. He stated that the next ten years 
may very well find electric energy competitive with the costs of 
fossil fuels. Discussion developed the fact that the University 
will still have to plan to expand its steam plant since new 
building requirements will occur faster than comprehensive de- 
cisions can be made on the broader use of electric heat. 
Mr. Hugill noted that the present plant can absorb only the Ad- 
ministration Building, Graduate Research Center and the Addition 
to Bartlett Hall before once again reviewing the question of 
moving over to electric heat, unless a new boiler is added to 
take care of the additional load. Mr. Nordbeck suggested that it 
?rauld be advantageous to have a "test vehicle" in the form of one 
building heated electrically to provide information and data 
which might be useful in future planning for utilities in the 
northwest dormitory area. The Project 6 dormitories are ideal 
for this purpose. He also emphasized that in the future, each 
time we build the question of electric heat will come up so we 
had better get a test going now. 

The President inquired about the cost differential to 
students quartered in a dormitory heated electrically. Mr. Hugill 
responded that this would amount to $10.00 annually per student. 
The President said he felt it would certainly be v/orth more than 
this in comfort to the student by giving him room control of his 
heat. 

Further discussion revealed that only two power failures 
of approximately 30 minutes duration had occurred in the Uni- 
versity's electrical system (including power provided by Western 
Massachusetts Electric Company) during the last seven years; also, 
that electric power would be fed through wires buried under 
ground in the event that an electrically heated building were 
approved. A power failure would affect the steam boilers also. 

Treasurer Johnson outlined the concern of Mr. George 
Pumphret of the University Building Authority concerning the level 
of rental costs per student in Project 6 dormitories. 
Mr. Broadhurst had provided the follovdng: 

"The low bid for the construction of Project 6 
is on the basis of construction cost of 
$3,950.00 per student to be housed in the 
project. Adding the costs for architect's fees 
and other expenses for furnishings and other 
items to be initially provided by the Authority 

other than under the General Construction 



2585 



2586 



COMMITTEE 



Steam & 
Electric 

Utility 
Design 

Pro.iect 6 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Contract and financing costs, the total 
costs per student appear to be approxi- 
mately $4,650.00 per student. Estimating 

0.00 per thousand as the debt service 
and reserve cost per student, the debt 

rvice alone will v, e ",279.00 ner student 
annually. T o this should be added about 

15.00 ner student as the cost of interest, 
Trustee fee and Authority overhead, makin^ 
a total of $294.00 per student before a 
allowance is made for annual one rating 
maintenance and repair costs." 

Treasurer Johnson reviewed for the Committee and the 
ntatives of Stone & Webster some of the problems encountered 
in bringing utilities to dormitories in the Orchard Hill complex. 
He reported that Daniel 0'Connell and Sons, contractors for the 
southwest dormitory complex, were anxious to have firm schedules 
presented on utilities design for buildings located in tha- 5 : area. 
May 15, 1965 is the dat- wl en these utility am and electr 
must be completely installed. 

Mr. Nordbeck stated that the firm of Stone & Webster was 
blocked from implementing the details of a "crash program" set 
by the University last May 22 because of the following: 

1. Requirements imposed for methods of 
bidding contracts under exist: 
state procedure. 

2. Stone & Web ' s internal policy 
that they will not proceed on the 
basis of a simple verbal or letter 
authorization. They have no con- 
tract from the State except for a 
stud*- . 

He reported, for example, that the Bureau of Building 
Construction had given no authorization to Stone & Webster to pro- 
ceed further with utility design for this Project at this time. 
They have just completed the study. He added that the University 
requirement to prepare utility design within 30 days involved^ 
6,000 man hours" of" drafting — a schedule which is literally im- 
possible to achieve. 

After further discussion, Mr. Nordbeck advanced what he 
regarded as the best and least expensive solution to the problem 
of obtaining utilities designs for the area at the earliest 
possible date. This involved letting the complete design and con- 
struction contract directly to a single firm on a reimbursable 
cost basis. He stated that he would consult with his management 
and report whether this plan might be acceptable to them. 



COMMITTEE 



m 



2587 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Further discussion revealed the following: 

That involvement with a cost reimbursable 
contract would require approval from 
Commissioner Waldron's Office, and that 
such approval would involve pressing upon 
the Commissioner the status of the Proje 
6 utility design and construction contracts 
as a serious emergency. 

Treasurer Johnson stated that Mr, O'Connel's contract 
calls for completion of the low rise dormitories on August 15th 
and that the University must have the buildings available by that 
tin© in order to move in furniture and prepare to receive students 
early in September. Approximately two months will be required for 
site work and cleanup, backing up to June 15. 

This establishes June 15, 1965 as the outside date on 
which utilities must be ready and available at the site. 
Mr. Nordbeck commented that, under the state system, three weeks 
are required for the issuing and return of bids on sub-contracting, 
He stated that Stone & Webster could achieve the same result with- 
in three or four days if permitted to do so. 

Chairman Haigis queried whether a bid procedure would be 
used, -nro^iding the utility design and construction contracts were 
permitted to be let on a cost reimbursable basis, Mr, Nordbeck 
replied in the affirmative. In a series of questions, Trustee 
Emerson established that the normal time factor involved in 
processing the utility contracts on a "non-crash" basis would be 
approximately three months; also, that contractor O'Connell's 
portion of the work represents approximately 1/6 of the overall 
project. Mr. White said that he was optimistic about a 30-day 
time limit on completion of utility design for the O'Oonnell 
portion of the project, providing it were isolated from Project 6 
a whole. A further requirement in order to meet the August 15 
deadline would be to arrange for low and high pressure steam lines 
from the power plant to the Project 6 site. 

Mr. Nordbeck cautioned that the 30-day assumption out- 
lined above presumed the clearing away of any long discussions or 
disputes at the state level, and the rendering of prompt approvals 
and decisions by state authorities. 

\ Hugill observed that if utility designs are not 
available until March 1, and with complete optimism about no addi- 
tional delays, the best the University could hope for would be a 
completion date some October. He recommended the 

escoping of design and construction as the best way. to bri: 
the schedule back within the desired timetable, Mr. Nordbeck 
stated that, if design and construction proceed together, utility 
construction could begin by March 1, 



2588 



COMMITTEE 



Proposed New 

Western 

Massachusetts 

Elec+r^c 

Company 

Contract 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Discussion concluded on the note that Mr. Nordbeck would 
consult with the manr r to determine the 

firm's workload in the weeks ahead. The next step would be 
meet missioner V/aldron and Mr, C Treasurer Johnson 
observed that it would take the full \ t of the Board of 

Trustees and the Unive' \uthority to bring home 

nature and dimensions of this eme: i ^-opriate state 

officials. 

Upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 
unanimous ly 

VOTED : To recommend to Board 

at utility design and construction 
?_ans for the sot q% & - m- 

plex be. design! d as an em 

■iorii d that the Board recommend 
to the Univers" luilding Authority a 
nlan whereby the Board and the Authoril 
mr prevE : he Office of 
ler on Administration and 
Finance t" bility Design and Con- 
struction Plan- he expedited. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Mr, Harry Hugill, 
Director of the Physical Plant, out Lined V ins of a osed 

new electrical con *th th^ Western Massachusetts Electric 
Company, (Document 2) Basici 13&, the proposed new contract 
provides electric service to the campus at a reduced rate. 

Proposed New Rates 

The proposed nw! rates would provide 13,800 volt power 
at our points of connection, metered at the switch box. 



8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p. . 
schedule: 



10:00 p.m. to 8:00 a.m. 
schedule : 



First 750,000 kilowatt hours 
for a flat rate of $13,500 
per month. All other use at 
1.5'f per kilowatt he 

All electricity at 7 mills 
per kilowatt hour. 



For an all-electric building, a reduction of 1.5 mills 
per kilowatt hour. 

The University is not to exceed its present generating 
capacity during the term of the contract. Duration of the con- 

•t is ten years. The proposed date of effect is January 1, 1965 



COMMITTEE 



INIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Treasurer Johnson reported that the Western Massachusetts 
Electric Company would have to obtain inproval of the Publ' 
Utilities Commission, the Board of Trusts Id have to approve 
it, and the Attorney General review it before the contract could 
be placed into effect. 

Director Hugill reported that the proposed contract 
would materially reduce the University's monthly electrical rate 
charges. Eliminated would be the following: 

a. The demand charge 

b. Multiple metering charge 

'essed for an opinion on the contract, 
Mr. Nordbeck indicated that Western Massachusetts Electric 
Company was a client of Stone & Webster, and would, therefore, 
decline to comment on any contractual relationship. He observed, 
however, that Stone & Webster studies did agree with the substance 
of the contract. 

Trustee Emerson raised a question of whether a conflict 
of interest might be involved in view of the fact that Stone & 
Webster was retained by the University while at the same time 
listing Western Massachusetts Electric Company as a client. 
Mr. Nordbeck replied in the negative, noting that the advice of 
Stone & Webster to the Board related to design and construction 
work only, and that the report submitted today had contained 
figures reflecting adversely on the cost of electric power as 
against steam. He also stated that this relationship had been 
revealed to B.B.C, prior to entering upon the contract. 



meeting. 



At this point Messrs. White and Nordbeck left the 



The Chairman then called for reconsideration if item #1 
on- the agenda, "Report of Stone & Webster on Electric Heat for 
Three High Rise Dormitories - Southwest Area (Project 6)". After 
brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend to the University Build- 
ing Authority that they adopt for 
Project 6 the alternate of two high 
rise dormitories serviced by steam 
and one high rise dormitory with all- 
electric utilities. 

The President instructed Director Hugill to provide the 
Secretary with copies of the proposed new Western Massachusetts 
Electric Company contract so that it might be circulated to the 
Board of Trustees and to call a five-minute Committee meeting 
prior to the full Board meeting on December 16 to vote on whether 
or not to recommend the contract to the Board of Trustees. 



2589 



2590 



COMMITTEE 



Appointment 
of Architects 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Emerson suggested reviewing with the University's 
legal counsel the possibility of including an escalator reducation 
clause to take effect in case general electrical utilities rates 
decline overall within the next ten years. He also proposed the 
inclusion of a "right of review" option after the contract had been 
in effect five years. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that no official word had been 
received concerning the appointment of architects on three projects 
the Library, the Addition to the School of Education and the Con- 
tinuing Education Center as recommended to the Office of 
Commissi Oi - ldron by the Board of Trustees. 

Chairman Haigis recommended that a al vote of the 
full Board of Trustees be hand delivered + o Commissioner Waldron, 
reaffirming the Board's original list o^ s on architects 
which had been transmitted to the Commissioner's Office. 

The meeting ™as adjourned at 12:4# p.m. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J . . M {'> fe&i 

Robert J. McCartney * 
Secretr- .oard o^ Trustee; 



' 



f 



I 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 
December 10, 1964, 11:30 a.m., President's Office, South College 



PISSINT: Trustees Haigis, Emerson and Scliu^k; 
Provost Tippo, Secretary M&Cartney. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION: Director of Physical Plant Hugill. 

Chairman Haigis reported that Mr. Edward Durell Stone, 
architect of New York City, was unable to be present as planned 
for the meeting due to an unexpected personal emergency. 
Mr. Hugill announced that, in the unexpected absence of Mr. Stone, 
Mr, Chase had returned to Boston. 

The Chairman reported that Commissioner waldron, through 
the Governor, wished to have Mr, Stone considered as a possible 
architect for the Library. He stated that there was no objection 
whatsoever to adding a new name to the list which had previously 
been approved by the full Board of Trustees and relayed to 
Commissioner Waldron 's office. On the other hand, there was no 
requirement for giving him number one priority. 

The Chairman called for a meeting of the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds to be set for 11:00 a.m., Wednesday, 
December 16, prior to the meeting of the full Board of Trustees. 
The Secretary was requested to inform Mr, Stone of this arrange- 
ment and to request that he be present at that time for an inter- 
view. 

The Chairman reported that the emergency on bringing 
Project 6 utility design and contract work to completion on the 
existing timetable has reached crisis proportions with the dis- 
engagement of interest in this contract by the firm of Stone & 
Webster, 

Mr, Hugill reported that Francis Associates had been 
contacted and were interested in the job and vailing to go 
directly to work. He added that a conversation yesterday between 
the President, Treasurer Johnson and Commissioner Waldron elicited 
the fact that the Commissioner intended to appoint the firm of 
Jackson and More land to do the job. 

Mr. Hugill pointed out that he had investigated the 
qualifications of the following firms to handle the assignment: 

1. Francis Associates 

2. Jackson & More land 

3. Charles T. Main 

4. Fred Dubin 

5. Loekwood Green 



2591 



Interview with 
Architect Stone 
Cancelled 



Date of 
Next Meeting 



Priorities for 
Utility Design 
and Contract 
Work - 
Project 6 



/0< 



■92 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Hugill stated that the firm of Jackson & Ivloreland 
was an old one dating back to the 1800 's, and a good, reputable 
firm active in the Boston area, specializing in design and con- 
struction of power plants. He reported that Mr. Chase was in 
agreement with the initial choice of Francis Associates. He 
stated that a question of ethics was involved, since the firm of 
Francis Associates had already been advised to report and proceed 
with the job. He added that the firm of Jackson & Moreland do 
have the manpower to carry out the assignment. 

Chairman Haigis observed that, in view of the responsible 
sources from which a recommendation of Jackson & l.breland derives, 
their work performance reliability should be acceptable. 

Trustee Emerson registered his displeasure with the fact 
that the University apparently will not be able to designate its 
own list of priorities to handle utility design and contract work, 
but, instead, must accept the choice of authorities in Boston. He 
stated that the University's priority list should be placed on 
record immediately by telegram through President Lederle to 
Commissioner Waldron. He asked whether the firm of Francis 
Associates could meet our emergency timetable for completion of the 
project. Mr, Hugill replied in the affirmative, adding that the 
firm of Jackson & l.breland is a larger corporate entity generally 
more stereotyped in their approaches and procedures. 

Trustee Emerson then queried whether the firm of Jackson 
& Moreland could meet our timetable. Mr, Hugill responded in the 
affirmative, at least for the critical part of the program in- 
volving a deadline of May 15, 1965. 

Mr. Hugill then proceeded to describe the procedure that 
was proposed for the execution of the project: 

1. A limited amount of design and the draw- 
ing up of a complete set of specifications. 

2. The establishment of unit price bids for 
all items of work. 

3. While specifications were out to bid, his 
office would: 

a. Refine designs for work on the dormitories, 
establishing completion dates and penalty 
clauses 

b. Refine designs on the backup work required 
to get electrical and steam utilities to 
the site, including the establishment, of 
completion dates and penalty clauses 

c. Establish a schedule for the completion of 
the balance of the work. 



r 



i 



i 



COMMITTEE 



2593 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



After further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded 
and unanimously (lacking one vote for a quorum)* 

VOTED : To establish the following list of 
priorities for architectural firms 
for design and construction work of 
utilities related to the southwest 
dormitory complex (Project 6): 

1. Francis Associates 

2. Jackson & More land 

3. Charles T. Main 

and to instruct President Lederle 
immediately by telegram that he relay 
this priority list to Commissioner 
Waldron, stressing the Committee's 
urgent concern to expedite word of the 
utility design and construction con- 
tract so that the emergency deadline of 
May 15 will be met. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12 noon. 



Respectfully submitted, 




/ 



A JU^J' lit I {M»L; ., , 
Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, ^oard of Trustee 




I 



* This vote subsequently cast by 
President Lederle by telephone. 



2594 



COMMITTEE 



Change of 
Name - 
College of 
Agriculture 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE 

AND HORTICULTURE 

December 14, 1964, 10:00 a.m., Parker House, Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT : Chairman Emerson, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Lyons and McNamara; 
Secretary McCartney. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Dean SpieLonan of the College of 
Agriculture, Associate Dean 
Jeffrey and Associate Director 
Damon. 



At the invitation of the Chairman, Dean Spielman intro- 
duced a report to the Trustees regarding the name of the College 
of Agriculture (Document 65-034), which document is attached here - 
to and will be forwarded to all members of the Board of Trustees. 
There is no consensus in the College of Agriculture as to a new 
and more definitive name. "College of Economic Biology and 
Agriculture", v/ould perhaps come closest to accurately reflecting 
the College's present role. 

In response to a query from the Chairman, Dean Spielman 
indicated that it was too early to measure the results of what had 
transpired in other universities as a result of their name changes 
in Colleges of Agriculture. In response to a request from the 
Chairman, Dean Spielman added that the reaction of the College of 
Agriculture Advisory Committee concerning proposed change of name 
was strongly on the side of not dropping the word "Agriculture" 
from the title. 

Trustee Lyons observed that the movement for change of 
name is due to a general switch over in the Commonwealth and the 
nation to an industrial society. The University hasn't been 
agricultural for a long time. Only 3% of the students are now 
majoring in fields related to Agriculture. Thus, Agriculture now 
comes to mean more "science" than "farming". 

The President stated that we want the term "Agriculture" 
in the new name, since this is our birthright. He added that 
something additional is desirable to make the entire label more 
descriptive of exactly what we are doing in this field. 

Chairman Emerson observed that the Committee would be 
guided by the decision of the President in this matter reached 
after discussion with Provost Tippo who was not present for the 
Committee's discussion. 



COMMITTEE 



IVERSITY OF 



JASSACHUSETTS 



Dean Spielman reported that the so-called Landry Bill 
introduced in the Legislature last year calling for a legislative 
study of County Extension work will probably be re-introduced 
this year. The Massachusetts Federation of Taxpayers Association 
appears to be pressing a campaign against county government and 
county extension work. While there are those who would have the 
University take a stand in support of county extension, it seems 
best that the University continue to maintain a strictly neutral 
position. 

In response to a query from Trustee Brown, Dean 
Spielman reported that Massachusetts was the only state with 
complete county autonomy. He noted that in Connecticut where the 
county system was abolished several years ago, the county exten- 
sion staffs were transferred to the University. 

It was noted that the University has a real obligation 
to broaden its agricultural extension concept into a genuine 
philosophy of continuing education, taking into account the re- 
quirements of urban society. 

There ?/ere some cautioning comments that the University 
should not get its future program in Adult Education involved 
with the county extension work. 

Dean Spielman reported that the University will spend 
approximately one-half million dollars on testing programs, seed 
and fertilizers, pullorum, elm disease, etc. These programs are 
becoming more costly. At present, the College of Agriculture 
must take funds away from teaching and extension to meet its 
statutory obligations under the mandate given to the Experiment 
Station. 

The Dean urged that the University prepare a realistic 
budget to present to the Legislature, isolating sums to be spent 
for testing programs, and permitting the Legislature to decide 
how much support they wish to lend to these programs. President 
Lederle added that he would like to see the control services ex- 
penditure line-itemed in the budget so that its distinctly non- 
educational character would be clearly apparent and not charged 
against the student head count as a cost of instruction. 

It was brought out that the control services are 
supported entirely on state funds with no federal assistance. 

Commissioner McNamara observed that the University was 
conducting certain control activities which should logically be 
handled by the Department of Agriculture, Dean Spielman added 
that two other state departments, Public Health and Natural Re- 
sources, might like to administer certain of these functions. 

Commissioner McNamara observed that the University's 
principal role is that of education and research and that it 

should not function as a regulatory agency. 



2595 



University 
Relationship 
to County 
Extension 
Services 



Future of 
Control 
Services 
Program 



^ 



;596 



COMMITTEE 



Program 
Objectives 
College of 
Agriculture 



Experiment 
Stations at 
Walt-ham and 

East Wareham 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Emerson summarized and suggested further review 
of problems related to the budgeting of funds for Control Services 
so that a definite recommendation could be brought to the next 
meeting of the Committee. 

Dean Spielman outlined detailed items on a sheet 
entitled "Program Objectives - Teaching, Research, Extension of 
the College of Agriculture, University of Massachusetts", 
(Document 65-035) which document is attached hereto, and will be 
forwarded to all members of the Board of Trustees. 

The Dean indicated that the College had completed all 
organizational changes which could be foreseen for the near future 
and wished to concentrate at this time on program development. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that they approve the Statement of Pro- 
gram Objectives of the College of Agri- 
culture as detailed in Document 65-035. 

Dean Spielman raised the question of the functions of 
the experiment stations at Waltham and Ware ham. He said some 
staff members have expressed the feeling that we should not con- 
tinue to give support to the field stations at Waltham and Wareham 
because they are service, rather than, research-oriented. The 
flower and cranberry growers want and need applied research and 
help on specific problems. 

Dean Spielman stated that it was his policy to support 
productive staff members wherever they are located. However, he 
does not wish the field station staffs simply to degenerate into 
professional service stations for home owners. He is making a 
genuine attempt to buttress the graduate programs in these areas. 

Trustee Lyons reflected his disappointment with the fact 
that Channel 2 had dropped the "Home Gardener" program, a substi- 
tute for which now comes from New Jersey. Dean Spielman stated 
that the program was dropped in part because it had multiplied the 
requests for information beyond all reason at the Waltham Field 
Station. He indicated that the program could be revived but that 
the College of Agriculture must be given additional money to 
support it. 

Items 6 and 7 on the agenda were passed over due to the 
necessity for commencing on a meeting of another committee of the 
Board. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Dean Spielman issued to members of the Committee a 
document entitled "Outdoor Recreation Reference File" which out- 
lined the planning and resource development program being con- 
ducted at the Holdsworth Natural Resources Center, 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:20 p.m. 



2597 



Respectfully submitted; 



• 






C y 1 



vV'^' UM 



(f, u 



tuu. 



Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, ,B6ard of Trustees 




Natural Re- 
source De- 
velopment & 
Planning 
Center* 



1 



;598 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF AD HOC COMMITTEE ON MEDICAL SCHOOL 
December 14, 196<4, 12:30 p.m., Parker House, Boston, Mass, 



PRESENT : Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Fox, Frechette and Solomon; 
Dean Soutter, Secretary McCartney. 

The meeting was called to order by the Chairman, and it 
was moved, seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the 
purpose of discussing possible sites 
for the location of the University's 
Medical School. 

After extensive discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To come out of executive session for 
the purpose of adjournment. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:50 p.m. 



Respectfully submitted, 






K 






Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF AD HOC COMMITTEE OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

TO WORK WITH BOSTON TASK FORCE 

December 16, 1964, 9:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman I^yons, President Lederle; 
Trustees Fox, Brown, Troy; Provost 
Tippo, Treasurer Johnson, Dean 
Redf ern, Secretary McCartney 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION : 



Director Cadigan, Director Hugill, 
Mr, Brand; Mr. Robert Caffrey of 
Heller Associates; Messrs, Anderson, 
Rosane and Associates of Drurnmey- 
Rosane-Anderson; Mr. Crowley and 
Associates of Francis Associates; 
also Mr, Austin Broadhurst of Ely, 
Bartlett, Brown and Proctor, and 
Mr. McManus of R. M. Bradley & Co,, 
Inc. 

Chairman Iyons stated that the purpose for which the 
meeting had been called was to hear a report by the firm of 
Drummey-Rosane-Anderson on comparative costs and feasibility of 
renovations for three tentative sites for the University of 
Massachusetts/Boston , 

Upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the 

purpose of hearing the report by repre- 
sentatives of Drummey-Rosane-Anderson, 

After extensive discussion accompanied by an illustrated 
presentation, it was moved, seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To come out of executive session for the 
purpose of adjournment. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:25 p,m. 



Resmctfully submitted, 




Robert J./^icjcartney 
Secretaryy^Board of Trust* 



2599 



Architectural 
Studies Report 
on Renovations 
Proposed 
UM/Boston Sites 



2600 



COMMITTEE 



Interview with 
Archi+ec+- 
Edward Dure 11 
S+one 



Proposed New 

western 

Massachusetts 

Electric 

Contract 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

December 16, 1964, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass, 

PRESENT ; Trustees Haigis, Emerson, Brown 
and Schuck; Treasurer Johnson 



S 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Mr. Edward Dure 11 Stone, Archi- 
tect of New York City; and 
Mr. William Smith, Executive 
Assistant to Mr, Stone 



The Chairman introduced Mr. Stone to members of the 
Committee. Mr. Stone outlined the background of his career and ex- 
perience including his prior associations in the greater Boston 
area, and his present commitment on several projects in New England 
including the NASA complex in Cambridge. 

Mr. Stone stressed the fact that he did his own design 
work, and that his firm specialized in providing realistic cost 
estimates and in bringing contract bids in at or below the 
projected budget. 

A slide presentation illustrating many of the buildings 
and projects designed by Mr. Stone followed. 

After discussion, and upon motion duly made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
VOTED : To add the name of Edward Dure 11 Stone to 
the proposed list of architects for the 
Library, and to so advise the Commissioner 
of Administration. 

Chairman Haigis read a letter from Marlowe G. Moses, 
Executive Vice President of Western Massachusetts Electric Company, 
indicating the company 1 s view that their proposed ten-year term for 
the new contract with the University is both fair and equitable, 
and that the low prices quoted are based upon a long-term contract. 
Discussion followed, and it developed that the sense of the 
Committee was that they would feel better about the proposed con- 
tract if a clause were included to reduce the rate in the event of 
downward electric rates applying to equivalent service during the 
ten-year period. 



k 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Treasurer Johnson was instructed by the Committee to 
renegotiate with Western Massachusetts Electric Company on this 
point. 



The meeting adjourned at 12:40 P.nu 



Respectfully submitted, 



Robert J/ McCartney 
Secretary /Board of Trus 




2601 



2602 



COMMITTEE 



Chancellor 
UM/Boston 



Chairman of 

Humanities 

UM/Boston 



Selective 

Merit 

Increments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY 

AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

January 14, 1965, 1:00 p.m., Dukes Room, Student Union, Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Schuck, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Haigis, Plimpton 
and Troy; Provost Tippo, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



k 



PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Mr. DeNyse, Mr. Suid. 



At the invitation of the Chairman, Provost Tippo 
discussed the qualifications of nominees for the position of 
Chancellor and Professor of Government, U.M. /Boston; also, Chair- 
man of Humanities and Professor of English, U.M. /Boston. 

After further discussion and upon motion duly made and 
seconded, it was unanimous 2y 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the appointment of Dr. John W. Ryan to 
the post of Chancellor and Professor of 
Government, University of Massachusetts/ 
Boston, effective July 1, 1965, at an 
annual salary specified in Document 
65-039, Supplement #1; also, to recommend 
to the Board of Trustees the appointment 
of Professor Alvan S. Ryan to the post 
of Professor of English with tenure, and 
Chairman of Humanities, University of 
Massachusetts/Boston at an annual salary 
specified in Document 65-039, Supplement 
#2 and to forward copies of Supplements 
#1 and #2 to the members of the Board of 
Trustees . 

Discussion next turned to the selective merit increment 
schedule proposed to become effective February 1, 1965. 

The Provost outlined the procedure for determining those 
eligible for recommended increments as follows: 

1. Each faculty member prepared a written 
report on his scholarly, professional 
and University activities. 



■ 



4 



n 



COMMITTEE 



2603 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

2. Department Heads evaluated the contributions 
of all members of their departments giving 
special consideration to any past inequities 
(such as those created by bringing in a 
younger less experienced man at a higher 
salary than someone who has been on the 
faculty for a few years), teaching ability, 
length of service, research and scholarly 
contributions, honors, residential college 
and counseling service, public service, etc. 

3. Department Heads consulted departmental 
personnel committees. 

4. Recommendations of Heads were discussed with 
the Dean of the College who in turn consulted 
his college personnel committee. 

5. The Provost reviewed every faculty report 
and every evaluation report of the Heads 
and Deans and then discussed the incremental 
recommendations with the President. 

The Provost stressed that hundreds of hours had been 
spent altogether on the final decisions and that many individuals 
were involved in making each decision. He expressed the view that 
a very thorough and objective job had been accomplished. He 
mentioned the following statistics relative to the overall salary 
adjustment schedule: 

Five and one-half percent of the salary budget 
was used for the selective merit increments. 
This was true of all colleges and schools as 
well as the administrative area. 

Two-thirds of our professional personnel re- 
ceived increments (63S persons from a total 
of 935 individuals - i.e. 65%) 

The assignment of these selective increments 
will have the result of raising our faculty 
(10-month appointees) salary average by $500. 

The Provost indicated that supporting material was 
available to document the decisions made, and that Deans of 
individual schools and colleges were available to the Committee to 
answer any questions if necessary. 

The question was raised whether sufficient money was 
being requested for new positions in the University, and the 
Provost responded that we are seeking 130 new persons for the 
Amherst campus next academic year and 70 faculty members for W&/ 
Boston, We seek faculty positions on the basis of a 15:1 ratio. 



2604 



COMMITTEE 



Lifting of 
Present 
Salary 
Ceiling 



Salary 
Adjustments 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson noted that we were short about 65 positions this 
academic year because we admitted more students than we had 
budgeted for, and he expressed confidence that these positions 
would be picked up for the next academic year in the '66 budget. 
Brief discussion followed on the instructional budget in the College 
of Agriculture, and the faculty/student ratio in the School of 
Nursing, following which a question was raised concerning the 
establishment of new salary levels for the President and the Provost. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that a bill had been filed with 
the Legislature to lift the ceiling on Medical School faculty 
salaries and to permit lifting the ceiling on approximately 2% of 
the professional staff in the rest of the University. 

The President reported that a group of western Massa- 
chusetts legislators had been briefed on this bill, together with 
other legislation in which the University is interested, at a 
seminar held on Friday, January 8. Trustee Crowley queried about 
representative presidential salaries in the nation. Provost Tippo 
responded with a few representative figures, some of them dating 
back one or two years, as follows: 

University of Kentucky - $30,000 (64-65) 
University of Washington - $35,000 (61-62) 
University of Illinois - $36,000 (61-62) 

Deans' salaries at the University of Michigan range from 
$18,000 to $34,000, with an average of $25,300. At Minnesota the 
maximum is $34,000 with an average of $22,204. 

Discussion followed on the problem of keeping a relative 
balance between top administrative salaries, particularly that of 
the President, with reference to certain other salaries required to 
procure the best possible faculty, as, for example, within the 
Medical School. 

Treasurer Johnson expressed satisfaction that the question 
of raising the Salary Ceilings had been brought up, and suggested 
that it would be a proper matter of concern for the entire Board of 
Trustees. 

Following further brief discussion, and upon motion being 
duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
it approve the proposed schedule of Salary 
Adjustments to become effective February 1, 
1965, as contained in Document 65-038, to- 
gether with Supplement #1 which Document 
and Supplement will now be forwarded to the 
Board of Trustees. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
approval of the Classification of Position 
Titles, effective on and after February 1, 
1965, as detailed in Document 65-040, which 
Document will now be forwarded to the Board 
of Trustees. 

It was also 

VOTED t That the Committee hereby formally request 
of each member of the Board of Trustees 
that he support, by individual appearances 
at public hearings of the Committee on Edu- 
cation, Committee on Ways and Means, and 
by any other appropriate means, Bill No. S.lll 
(Education), "An Act Providing For Compensa- 
tion For Officers and Staff of the Medical 
School and Other Departments of the University 
of Massachusetts." 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:15 p.m. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, /board of Trustees 




2605 



Classification 
of Position 
Titles 



2606 



COMMITTEE 



Gilbert L. 

Woodside 

Property 

Land 
Acquisition 



Approval of 

Plans and 

Specifications 
Administration 
Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
February 11, 1965, 1:15 p.m., President's Office, U of M, Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, Trustees Brown, 
Emerson and Schuck; Provost 
Tippo, Treasurer Johnson and 
Secretary McCartney 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Mr. Harry Hugill, Director 
of Physical Plant 



• 



Water, Sewage 
and Drainage 
Systems 



In accordance with Chapter 64B, Acts of 1963, authorizing 
the Trustees of the University to acquire certain lands with the 
buildings thereon, for the development of the University, by pur- 
chase or by eminent domain under Chapter 79 of the General Laws, 
and the authority granted therein, independent appraisals of the 
value of the land and buildings having been made by qualified dis- 
interested appraisers, and filed with Kenneth W, Johnson, Treasurer, 
on motion duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they purchase or take by eminent domain in 
fee, the property of Gilbert L. Woodside 
and Mary L, Woodside, husband and wife, 
situate off Sunset Avenue, in Amherst, 
Hampshire County, Massachusetts, and more 
particularly described as Parcel 8, Page 
11-C of the Town Atlas, Town of Amherst, 
and that the purchase price for said 
property be Six Thousand ($6,000.00) 
dollars. Taxes to be pro rated. 

The Treasurer noted that recent increases in campus hold- 
ings had brought the size of the campus to approximately 1100 acres. 

After review and brief discussion, it was moved, seconded 
and unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the acceptance of final plans for the 
Philip F. Whitmore Administration 
Building as presented by the firm of 
Campbell & Aldrich. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

the acceptance of final plans for addi- 
tions to the water, sewage and drainage 
systems in the southwest dormitory area 
as submitted by Whitman & Howard, Inc. 



[ 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

the acceptance of preliminary plans for 
the steam and electric systems, inside 
the southwest dormitory area only and 
exclusive of street lighting, as pre- 
sented by Jackson & Moreland. 

Brief discussion followed concerning the desirability of 
conducting an overall study for a general campus street lighting 
plan. It was agreed that such a study would prove helpful. 

After further discussion and upon motion being made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

the acceptance of preliminary plans for 
the Central Storage Building as submitted 
by Peirce & Pierce. 

It was also 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
VOTED : approve the site work for the School 
of Business Administration. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that certain stipulations con- 
tained in a proposed contract with the Western Massachusetts 
Electric Company (Document 65-032) had been altered as a result of 
overtures at Trustee direction between his office and the Company. 

1, The word "installed" would be removed 
from a stipulation limiting the Uni- 
versity's ability to add generating 
capacity either "installed or placed 
in operation." 

2. It was agreed that the price for 
electricity could be renegotiated 
after five years upon either party 
giving 30 days notice to the other, 
the price agreed upon as a result 
of such renegotiation to be binding 
for the ensuing five-year duration 
of the contract. 

Mr. Hugill reported that he had consulted with his 
colleagues at a recent conference of directors of physical plants 
and that they considered the terms of the contract favorable. He 
noted that the University's cost for electricity was going down 
from 1.6 cents to 1,1 cent per kilowatt hour. 



2607 



Steam and 

Electric 

Systems 



Master 

Lighting 

Plan 



Central 
Storage 
Buildings 



School of 
Business Ad- 
ministration 



Western 

Massachusetts 

Electric 

Company 

Contract 



2608 



COMMITTEE 



Request to 
UM Building 
Authority 



Northwest 
Dormitory 
Complex 



Naming of 
Stadium 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After brief discussion and upon motion being duly made 
and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the proposed contract with 
Western Massachusetts Electric Company 
(Document 65-032) with deletion of the 
word "installed" on page 3, line 22 
and the added stipulation that the rate 
charge for electricity per kilowatt 
hour may be renegotiated after a five- 
year period upon either party to the 
contract giving 30 days notice to the 
other, the price agreed upon as a re- 
sult of such meeting to be binding for 
the ensuing five-year duration of the 
contract. 

Discussion followed on a list of requests which would 
be made of the University of Massachusetts Building Authority, 

It was moved, seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To ask the Board of Trustees to request 
the Building Authority to proceed with 
the schedule of projects which their 
architects had given to them as of this 
date. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that an architect be procured for de- 
sign work on the northwest dormitory 
complex, providing for 1,4-00 students 
and including a dining hall, the same 
to be completed by 1969, with a 
further view that the entire area when 
completed would accommodate approxi- 
mately 5,000 students. 

Treasurer Johnson indicated also a need for an archi- 
tectural study of the northwest dormitory area site on density 
and concentration of buildings to determine whether additional 
land areas need to be purchased to accommodate the proposed 
facilities. 

After full discussion, and consideration of several 
suggestions which had been presented to members of the Committee, 
it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the new football stadium be named 

"The Massachusetts Stadium." 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF 



IASSACHUSETTS 



Treasurer Johnson reported on a meeting which had been 
held with members of the Amherst Industrial Commission to consider 
their request for developing an industrial research park to be 
called the "Valley Research Center" approximately 4,000 feet in a 
northerly direction from the proposed University Graduate Research 
Center. This would involve the relinquishing of a tract of approxi- 
mately 80 acres now owned by the University as part of the Adams 
Farm acquisition. After lengthy discussion, the Committee expressed 
high approval of the forward thinking of the Amherst Industrial 
Commission, and expressed the hope that it might be able to 
cooperate with ultimate plans for a research center in the valley, 
concluding that further study would be desirable for all parties 
concerned. 

Treasurer Johnson indicated, in line with recent Trustee 
action affecting the preservation of the Homestead and Stockbridge 
House, that an inspection of the Old Physics Building had been made 
by himself, together with Mr. Bagnell. Based on this inspection, 
the Treasurer reported that the prospects for salvaging this build- 
ing appear unfavorable. 

The Treasurer reported that one of the priority problems 
in the University at this time is a general lag in the entire build- 
ing schedule. He indicated that he would send to the members of 
the Committee a full report containing a breakdown of the timetable 
for building completions in the near future. 

The meeting concluded with a brief, informal report by 
Treasurer Johnson on bids received for the site location of UM/ 
Boston. This business was to be taken up in further detail at the 
full board meeting of February 16, 1965. 

Trustee Brown briefed the Committee on developments in the 
southeastern area of the state, relating to SMTI. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:05 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted, 




>bert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 




2609 



Proposed 
Valley 
Research 
Center 



Old Physics 
Building 



Progress 
Report on 
Buildings 



9 



COMMITTEE 



Approval of 
Various Pro- 
grams and 
Courses at 
the Under- 
graduate and 
Graduate 
Levels 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY 

AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

April 7, 1965, 12 Noon, Dukes Room, Student Union, Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 

Trustees Haigis, Lyons and Plimpton; 
Provost Tippo, Secretary McCartney 
and Dean Redfern. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Dean Moore, Dean Hunsberger, 
Associate Dean Wagner, Assistant 
to the Provost Venman, Dr. Strother 
of Mathematics; Dean Spielman, 
Professor Kleis; Professor Taylor; 
Major Bamber and Captain Close 



Chairman Troy and Provost Tippo presented to the Committee 
for their consideration agenda of courses and programs of study at 
both the undergraduate and graduate level. 

After extended discussion and review, and the querying 
as appropriate of representatives of colleges and departments, it 
was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the approval of programs and courses 
as detailed in Document 65-033, which 
document is attached to and herewith made 
a part of these minutes. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 



Respectfully submitted, 



- "■:-:■ -, 






Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 




COMMITTEE 



2611 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
April 21, 1965, 11:30 a.m., Parker House, Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT : Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Emerson, Gordon, Pumphret 
and Troy; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATIO N: Mr. Ted Ladd of the firm of 
Standish, Ayer & Wood, Inc. 

The meeting was called to order by the Chairman and the 
report of the investment counsel, Standish, Ayer & Wood, Inc. was 
reviewed by the firm's representative Mr. Ted Ladd. Mr. Ladd re- 
ported that not much change had occurred in the period between 
October 1 and April 1, the date of their last report. He indi- 
cated that the firm's attitude toward investment might change with 
respect to stocks if there was an overall drift in the national 
business picture, or an increase in speculation. He predicted 
that, for the remainder of the year, the economy would remain 
strong. 

Mr. Ladd described the University's investment portfolio 
as generally conservative with respect to endowment funds, compared 
to that of certain other Universities. He indicated that the 
holdings were well diversified. 

With respect to bonds, Mr, Ladd indicated that Standish, 
Ayer & Wood, Inc. hold a constructive view on long-term 
treasuries. These have a good marketability. He stressed that 
the bond portfolio is of very high quality. In summary, he indi- 
cated that as of April 1, 1965 the portfolio was "just about where 
they (Standish, Ayer & Wood, Inc.) would like it to be." 
Approximately 55% balance in common stocks is an appropriate stock 
position, and relatively conservative. 

Attached hereto (Document 65-062) is a list of operating 
funds (non-state) now earning interest. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that there was uninvested cash 
on hand in the amount of $21,744.91. 

On the recommendation of investment counsel, it was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To buy $20,000 U.S. Treasury 4i-B/l5/92-87 , 
using uninvested cash. 

It was further 






Report of 
Standish, 
Ayer & Wood 
Inc. 



IE- 



2612 



:OMMITTEE 



Estate of 
George M. 
Codding 



Securities, 
Sales and 
Purchase : 
George M. 
Codding Request 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To sell 24 shares Borden Company 

39 shares Continental Casualty Company 
35 shares Insurance Company of North America 
27 shares J. C. Penney 
47 shares Philadelphia Electric 
100 shares Westinghouse Electric 

And to buy with proceeds therefrom: 

400 shares Hercules Powder 

The Treasurer next reported on the estate of George M. 
Codding, Class of 1909, portions of which estate were bequeathed to 
the University as main beneficiary and residual beneficiary under 
terms described in a letter, with attachments, from The Fairfie3_d 
County Trust Company, Stamford, Connecticut, under date of 
January 15, 1965, which letter and attachments (Document 65-056) 
are hereby attached to and made part of these minutes. 

After brief discussion and upon motion duly made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the bequest of George M. Codding, 
be accepted by the University of Massa- 
chusetts in accordance with terms 
described in Document 65-056 together 
with attachments. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the Fairfield County 
Trust Company had reported that there could be a distribution of 
securities under the estate at an early date, and that they would 
accept the recommendation of the Board of Trustees concerning sale 
and purchase of securities under this bequest. On advice of in- 
vestment counsel in their report of April 21, 1965, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Fairfield County 
Trust Company sale of the following 
securities from the George M. Codding 
estate: 



:OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Endowment Possible 
Fund Additions 
$10,000 



Issue 

U.S. Treas. ?k 6/15/72 
U.S. Treas. 4 8/15/70 



10,000 



100 



7,000 

5,000 Douglas Aircraft cv 4's 
2/1/77 
Olin Mathieson Chem. 

5l's 3/1/83 
Kaiser Aluminum 4.75 
cv pfd 
119 Bank of America (2.00) 
100 Bethlehem Steel (1.50) 
42 Fall River Nat. (3.00) 
3-20 Ingersoll Rand (2.00) 
50 Kennecott Copper (4. 00) 
80 R. J, Reynolds Tob.(l.80) 



It was further 



Approx . 
Market 

91 

99 

89 
124 



Market 
Value 



$ 



9,100 
6,930 

4,450 

12,400 



103 


10,300 


60 


7,140 


38 


3,800 


85 Est. 


3,570 


47 


5,640 


103 


5,150 


43 


3,440 



$71,920 



I 



VOTED : To authorize the Fairfield County 
Trust Company to purchase: 

150 shares Fireman's Fund Insurance 

100 shares First National Bank of Boston 

200 Gulf Oil Corporation 

$35,000 U.S. Treasury 4 1/8-2/5/74. 

The Treasurer reported on new endowments that had been 
received since the last meeting of the Committee. 

It was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the endowment funds listed in 
Document 65-057 be established on the 
records of the University, and that 
this document be attached to and made 
a part of these minutes. 

The Committee spent a great deal of time with the 
President and the Treasurer reviewing the Report of the State 
Auditor for the period July 1, 1963 to June 30, 1964. 

The Treasurer submitted Document 65-058 entitled "Report 
of the Treasurer on Notes and Comments, State Audit Report, 
July 1, 1963 to June 30, 1964, " which document is hereby attached 
to and made a part of these minutes. 

With reference to item 2 of the Treasurer's report, 
"Automobile Registration Fees," it was 



2613 



Establishment 
of New 
Endowment Funds 



Review of 
Auditor ' s 
Report 



Automobile 

Registration 

Fees 



in 



2614 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the Treasurer be authorized to re- 
turn to the State Treasurer the balance 
shown in the Auditor's Report on 
June 30, 1964, schedule XXVI, p. S41, 
said balance amounting to $6,681.31, 
which sum represents the balance of 
automobile registration fees on the 
date that the opinion of the Attorney 
General was received. 

The Treasurer noted that, as of July 1, 1964, on advice 
of legal counsel, the system was changed so that f£es were no 
longer assessed. Instead, identification stickers and booklets 
containing the regulations were sold as items of merchandise at the 
University Store. 

The Committee commended the Treasurer on the excellent 
state of fiscal affairs in the University as evidenced by the 
Auditor's Report. 

The Committee next turned to the question of liability 
insurance for University personnel operating motor vehicles. 
This is a matter that has been under continuous review by the 
Committee for some time. 

A copy of a letter from the firm of Ely, Bartlett, Brown 
and Proctor, dated April 16, 1965 relative to this matter, was 
discussed at length. 



The President commented that the matter of inadequate 
coverage was of serious concern to the faculty and employees of the 
University. The Faculty Senate recommended back in 1958 that 
liability insurance should be secured for University personnel. 
Since that time there have been a series of Faculty Senate recommend^ 
tions, the most recent being questions raised at the Faculty Senate 
meeting of February 25, 1965. There have been numerous refusals on 
the part of University personnel to operate state-owned vehicles 
without adequate protection. Even though the University owns two 
busses, there is only one person who will drive them due to the 
potential liability in case of accident. The Committee noted that 
the statutory coverage, under the option of the Attorney General, 
cannot exceed $10,000 and that legal counsel sees no legal 
objection to the purchase of adequate liability insurance coverage 
from the unrestricted earnings on trust funds. On recommendation 
of the President and the Treasurer, the Committee. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the policy be established of securing 
appropriate liability insurance covering 
University personnel in the operation of 
state-owned vehicles on official business. 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Pumphret volunteered to obtain information con- 
cerning types of insurance which would provide appropriate 
coverage for subsequent recommendation to the Trustees. 

The Treasurer asked the Committee to consider establish- 
ment of an account in a Boston bank to service the Boston branch 
with specific recommendations to come before the next meeting of 
the Committee. 

Federal grants for construction of buildings are avail- 
able under the Federal Higher Education Facilities Act of 1963 
and other Federal statutes, and it was after due discussion, 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that President John W, Lederle be 
authorized to submit proposals for 
Federal grants, and. that the Treasurer 
of the University, Kenneth W, Johnson, 
be authorized to execute agreements 
under the provisions of the Higher 
Education Facilities Act of 1963 and 
other Federal statutes granting funds for 
construction of buildings, facilities and 
equipment. 

The United States Agency for International Development 
has requested that President and Mrs. Lederle be present at the 
official dedication of the Tororo Girls' School in Uganda, which 
school has been built under supervision of the University of 
Massachusetts under contract with the Agency for International 
Development. The U. S. Ambassador to Uganda and high officials 
of the country will be among those present at the dedication. 
This contract also provides for the administration and operation 
of this school for the next several years. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
President and Mrs. lederle be encouraged to 
accept the invitation from the Director of 
the United States Agency for International 
Development Mission to Uganda, and that they 
be assigned to represent the University of 
Massachusetts and to participate in the formal 
exercises opening and dedicating the Tororo 
Girls' School on or about June 19, 1965, and 
that expenses incurred in officially represent- 
ing the University of Massachusetts on this 
important occasion be reimbursed from indirect 
cost allowance, AID-afe-86(Uganda) account. 



2615 



Banking for 
UJ^/Boston 



Authorization 
to Submit 
Proposals for 
Federal 
Grants 



Official 
Representation 
at Dedication 
of Tororo 
Girls' School 
Uganda 



~s 



2616 



COMMITTEE 

Emergency 
Transfer be- 
tween Sub- 
sidiary- 
Accounts 



Funds for 
Support of 
Graduate 
Assistants ' 
Stipends 



Four 

Colleges, 

Incorporated 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of the Treasurer an emergency 
transfer between subsidiary accounts 1350-01 was explained in de- 
tail in Document 65-059, which document is hereby attached to and 
made part of these minutes. 

It was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the transfer of funds as 
indicated in Document 65-059. 

On further recommendation of the Treasurer concerning use 
of free balances in certain accounts as needed for the support of 
the Graduate School for the payment of stipends for graduate 
assistants, as detailed in Document 65-060, which document is 
hereby attached to and made a part of these minutes, it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the use of free balances in the 
accounts detailed in Document 65-060 
for the support of the Graduate School 
for payment of stipends for graduate 
assistants be approved. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that, for some time, there had 
been under discussion by representatives of the Four Colleges the 
possibility of forming a Four College Corporation to facilitate 
some of the cooperative programs between the four institutions. 
Amherst College took the initiative in this, in having their legal 
counsel, Ropes and Gray, prepare a proposed charter and by-laws for 
such a corporation. This proposal has been reviewed by the 
University's legal counsel and found to be in order. The details 
of this proposal are set forth in Document 65-061, which document 
is herewith attached to and made a part of these minutes. 

The Mount Holyoke College Board of Trustees has already 
approved, and the Trustees of Smith and Amherst Colleges have the 
matter before them at this time. Since the material had not been 
distributed earlier, it was recommended that the proposal be re- 
viewed by the Committee, and if no objection was found, it would 
be recommended to the full Board of Trustees at a later meeting. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:20 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted, 









cr ' '" ' ' 



Robert J. MciCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



;OMM!TTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

May 7, 1965, 10:00 a.m., University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Board Room 

PRESENT ; Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Emerson, Gordon and 
Thompson; Provost Tippo, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Trustee Troy: Mr. Austin Broadhurst 

of Ely, Bartlett, Brown and Proctor; 

Mr. Richard Rosane of Drummey-Rosane- 

Anderson; Mr. Harry Hugill, Director 

of Physical Plant. 

At the request of the Chairman, item 4, "Naming of the 
Stadium' 1 was relocated to first place on the agenda. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
new football stadium be named "University of 
Massachusetts Alumni Stadium." 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Mr. Austin Broadhurst 
of the firm of Ely, Bartlett, Brown and Proctor reported to the 
committee on provisions of the legislation authorizing lease of 
the Boston Consolidated Gas Company property at 100 Arlington 
Street (250 Stuart Street); also, Mr. Broadhurst explained pro- 
visions of the lease. In substance, he indicated that enabling 
legislation permitting acquisition of the Boston Consolidated Gas 
Company property on a lease basis allowed the University to move 
now on renovations with an absolute minimum of compliance with 
existing statutes and regulations, providing the Board of Trustees 
was careful to maintain competition in the award of bids. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that, due to the loss of so 
much time up to this point, the University is up against an 
extremely critical situation in attempting to get the building 
ready in time for classes in September. He indicated that the 
University proposed to award contracts to qualified general con- 
tractors who can get the job done on time. The University, under 
these circumstances, would not ask for a filed list of sub-bid 
contractors, but would ask the general contractor to provide the 
list of sub-bid contractors in his general bid. State minimum 
wage rates would be used in all applicable trades. The University 
will follow the statute in that 100% bond for completion of work 
and 100% bond will be required. 



2617 



Stadium 

Named 



UM/Boston 

Renovation 

Plans : 

100 Arlington 

Street, Boston 



2618 



Critical Time 
Shortage 



COMMITTEE 



Library 
Acquisitions 



Appointment 
of Architect 
for UM/Boston 
Site 
Renovations 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Richard Rosane of Drummey-Rosane-Anderson indicated 
that adequate egress must be pr( vided in the building . Potential 
prime steel iron work contractors have already been contacted for 
stair towers in view of the critical shortage of time available 
between now and September. These contractors indicate a six-week 
allowance for manufacturing and a four -week allowance for installa- 
tion. 

Mr. Rosane warned that other elements requiring extensive 
lead time include all equipment: kitchen, library, laboratories, 
etc. He indicated the fim belief that all work should be done by 
a single prime general contractor. 

Discussion followed on the size and location of the 
library. The Director of Physical Plant indicated that initial 
plans called for approximately 30,000 volumes with as much reading 
space provided as possible. It was pointed out that 150,000 
volumes were envisioned by the Chancellor as soon as acquisition 
is possible. 

Mr. Rosane indicated that renovations on unused floors 
would have to continue after classes begin in September, and that 
work would continue throughout the fall and winter months. In 
response to queries, Treasurer Johnson indicated that approximately 
45,000 square feet of classroom space is available and approxi- 
mately 30,000 square feet of study lounges. Mr. Rosane added that 
three study-unit areas were planned per floor. 

Mr. Hug ill reported that it was expected to have the 
staircases in by the opening of classes in September. Also, class- 
rooms will be ready along with the language laboratory. However, 
he does not anticipate that wet labs will be in operation by 
September, although they should be available for use approximately 
six weeks after the opening of the semester. Success will depend 
upon the amount of lead time in placing orders, and the promptness 
with which delivery of equipment is made. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
employment of Drummey-Rosane-Anderson as archi- 
tects for the altering, remodeling, renovation 
and equipment of the premises at 250 Stuart 
Street, Boston, Massachusetts as a Boston 
Campus for the University be and hereby is 
authorized at a fee computed on the basis of 
time spent as set forth in the form of agree- 
ment presented to this meeting and with re- 
imbursement for out-of-pocket expenses; and 
that the Treasurer of the University be and 
he hereby is authorized to sign, deliver and 
accept an agreement for such employment for 



I 



COMMITTEE 



VOTED: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

services starting February 27, 1965, at 
such compensation and containing such 
other provisions as said officers shall, 
as evidenced by his taking the action 
hereby authorized, deemed necessary or 
advisable. 

"was further 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

That the President, the Treasurer and the 



Secretary of the University be and each 
acting alone hereby is authorized and 
designated to approve plans and specifica- 
tions for the renovation, remodelling and 
alteration of the building included in the 
premises constituting the Boston Campus of 
the University: and that it be declared to be 
the judgment of the Board of Trustees that 
the progress plans submitted to the Buildings 
and Grounds Committee at its meeting held 
prior to this meeting are appropriate subject 
to such modification of such plans to provide 
additional library and study space as may be 
feasible. 
It was also 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

VOTED : That the President, the Treasurer and the 
Secretary of the University be, and each 
acting alone hereby is, authorized and 
designated to contract in the name of the 
Commonwealth for the renovation, remodelling 
and alteration of the building included in 
the premises constituting the Boston Campus 
of the University, such authority and designa- 
tion to include all contracts necessary or 
desirable for such purpose in the judgment as 
evidenced by his taking the action hereby 
authorized of the officer or officers so act- 
ing, each such contract to require that the 
work contemplated thereby be performed 
in accordance with plans and specifications 
approved by the officer or officers of the 
University authorized and designated by the 
Board of Trustees for the purpose and by the 
lessor of said premises pursuant to paragraph 
5 of the lease thereof, dated May 5, 1965. 

Attorney Broadhurst reported that there was no legislation 
pending at this time to provide funds to purchase the UM/Boston 
building, although the University is required by law to do so by 
February 1, 1966 if an appropriation therefor is made by the 
Legislature. 



2619 



Designation of 
University 
Officers to 
Approve Plans 
and Specifica- 
tions UM/Boston 



Designation of 
University 
Officers to 
Contract for 
Renovation, 
Remodelling and 
Alteration of 
the Building, 
UM/Boston 



Funding 
Legislation: 
UM/Boston 
Site Purchase 



Other 
Business 



COMMITTEE 



Fraternity 

Residence 

Park 



Winkler 
Property 



Rubin 
Proposal 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The following item was taken up under the heading of 
Other Business: Proposal for Establishment of a Fraternity 
Residence Park . 

Treasurer Johnson introduced a letter received from 
Mervin H. Rubin of Springfield, Massachusetts containing a 
proposal for the development of a Fraternity: Residence Park in 
close proximity to the Universit; . 

One proposal involved acquisition by Mr. Rubin of two 
tracts of land located in Hadley west of Valley Lane, Amherst, 
which are bordered by Route 116 west and are owned by Peter 
Ostrowski and William Sheldon. It was proposed to donate all of 
the land involved in both tracts to the University, with a lease- 
back arrangement for 51 years for the westerly half of each tract. 
The westerly half of each tract would be used for the layout of a 
Fraternity Residence Park allowing for approximately 15 sites of 
one acre each. The natural assets of the area (wooded areas and 
brook) would be preserved for aesthetic and recreational purposes. 

Additional details of the Rubin proposal are contained 
in his letter to the Treasurer. Alternate proposal involved a 
gift of a portion of the land to the University under certain 
conditions . 

Discussion followed on the question of a general policy 
with respect to the location of future fraternity sites. 

The Treasurer outlined for the committee a proposal by 
others to develop a 26-acre site for 25 fraternities on the 
Paul K. Winkler property which had been presented to the Amherst 
Town Planning Group last week. He indicated that the latter 
proposal might be brought before the Amherst Town Meeting early in 
June. This land is a the northeast corner of the campus bordering 
the University and East Pleasant Street and Eastman Lane. The 
proposal is to re-zone the property to 'campus zone". He indicated 
further that Messrs. Sheldon and Ostrowski, whose property 
adjacent to the northwest corner of the campus was mentioned in 
the Rubin proposal, have been notified that the University plans 
to take their property . 

Concerning the Rubin proposal, Treasurer Johnson 
reported that the tract of land under discussion is low- lying, 
wet potato land in Hadley, a town which has no zoning restrictions. 
Bringing sewer and water to this particular tract from the town 
of Hadley is not possible due to the intervention of Route 116. 
Amherst water and sewer bisects the land, however. To date, 
Amherst has not permitted sewer and water access in this area. 
The University will need a road for access through the east part 
of the land to the future northwest dormitory area and Route 116. 
The Treasurer made it clear that he had advised Mr. Rubin that 
there was no way in which the University could guarantee that 
fraternities would locate in the proposed Residence Park. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Extensive discussion followed in which the President expressed the 
view that as long as fraternities continued to exist at the Uni- 
versity, a decent area should be provided for them in which to 
function. 

Further discussion led to the conclusion that additional 
study is needed in the following areas: 

1. Future role of fraternities at the University. 

2. Future land acquisition required for protection 
of University expansion and development within 
the frameY/ork of the overall concepts of the 
Master Plan. 

It was agreed that immediate exercise of eminent domain 
to acquire the Winkler property was of priority concern in the 
University 1 s expansion as recommended in the Master Plan. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
such steps as are necessary be taken 
immediately to acquire by eminent domain 
that portion of the Paul K. Winkler property 
for which funds are presently available. 

It was further 

VOTED : To table for the present the proposal of 

Mr. Merwin H. Rubin for the development of 
a Fraternity Residence Park, said proposal 
to be reviewed within the context of a 
study of two areas of future University 
development : 

1. Future expansion and location of 
fraternities. 

2. University requirements on fringes 
of the campus to guarantee and pro- 
tect proper and adequate expansion 
of the University within the frame- 
work of the Master Plan. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:25 p.m. 

Res^plsctfylly submitted, 



2621 



Winkler 
* Property 



Robert J. 
Se ere tar; 




2< 






COMMITTEE 



Dean 

Belluschi's 

Comments 



Mr. Sasaki's 
Comments 



Campus 

Lighting 

Plan 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
May 28, 1965, 12:30 p.m., Suffolk Room, Student Union, Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Emerson and Gordon; 
Provost Tippo, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Dean Pietro Belluschi, M.I.T.; 

Mr. Hideo Sasaki and Mr. Galehouse 

of Sasaki-Walker & Associates; 

Mr. Haas of Columbia University; 

Judge Blassberg of Greenfield; 

Mr. Marcel Breuer, Architect; 

Mr. Harry Hugill, Director of 

Physical Plant and Dr. William 

Field, Dean of Students. 

The Chairman introduced Dean Pietro Belluschi of M.I.T. 
who presented his views on the overall campus development plan. 
Dean Belluschi commented that he is quite happy about the archi- 
tectural trend in the campus Master Plan. He notes general im- 
provement, and termed the campus traffic circulation plan good and 
the choice of site locations good. The real break-through, he in- 
dicated, was in the selection of first-rate architects for build- 
ings now completed, under construction and in the planning stages 
in future months. He termed the excellence of architecture a "part 
of the educational process" for future generations of students 
coming to the campus. He stated that the Fine Arts Center should 
be one of the memorable buildings in the nation. 

Following Dean Belluschi's comments, Treasurer Johnson 
reviewed the extremely tight schedule which the committee needed to 
follow in order to complete the agenda for the meeting. 

Mr. Sasaki was invited to comment. He seconded Dean 
Belluschi's approval of the trend in campus architecture and the 
progress of the Master Plan. He felt that the location of the 
Library site was a most important decision which would affect the 
entire "feel" of the center of the campus. He felt that architect 
Stone could be "most aggressive" at a site northwest of the present 
Library building. 

Chairman Haigis noted that the committee needed, in 
cooperation with its architectural and master planning consultants, 

\ to review the overall campus lighting scheme. The President 
observed that the present business school lighting plan seemed in- 
adequate, and Mr. Galehouse noted that an overall lighting plan is 

; now being worked up which would include buildings, pedestrian walks 
and roadways. 



i 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



2623 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



There was discussion on the need for a man of great 
breadth in designing buildings for the new University Medical 
School. Dean Belluschi reported that certain architects had 
approached Dean Soutter on this matter. He indicated that 
medicine is such a special field that it might be wise to consider 
architects who had had previous experience in medical school de- 
sign. He emphasized that the facilities, in the event that the 
Medical School were located on the campus in Amherst, should be of 
the same idiom as the main campus. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the sum of $100,000 was 
on hand for commencing design of the project. He expressed a sense 
of urgency in the need to move forward on a master plan. Dean 
Belluschi was asked to recommend the names of architects who might 
be considered for designing medical school facilities, so that a 
schedule of interviews could be set up. Further discussion 
followed on the qualifications of a number of architectural firms 
including Architects Collaborative; Ellerbe of St. Paul, Minnesota; 
Hugh Stubbins Associates; Campbell & Aldrich, Shepley & Bullfinch 
and others. 

After further discussion, it was agreed that Chairman 
Haigis and Treasurer Johnson would work with Dean Belluschi to de- 
velop a priority list of architects for the Medical School for 
future consideration by the committee. 

The Treasurer noted with favor one important improvement: 
Commissioner of Administration McCarthy has stated that he wishes 
architects for future projects selected before appropriations are 
made, and this should serve to greatly expedite the process of 
project development. 

The committee next adjourned to Bartlett Hall where in- 
spection was conducted of full and sectional models of the Fine 
Arts Building, as presented by Saarinen Associates. 

The committee next adjourned to the Business Administra- 
tion Building where preliminary plans for the Library v/ere ex- 
plained. The sense of the committee was to favor a location north- 
west of Goodell Library for the new library. 

Mr. Sasaki described and explained the proposed new 
entranceway to the campus including the mall area. He showed plans 
outlining the portion of the circumferential highway which will 
proceed in an east-west direction connecting with North Hadley Road 

Treasurer Johnson indicated that the University would go 
out to bid immediately to rough grade and strip a 900-car parking 
area at the new main entrance to the campus. He indicated that 
small portions of the Baptist Church and Newman Center properties 
might be needed to construct the proposed roadway. 

After brief discussion, it was unanimously 



Recommendation 
on Architects 
for New Projects 



Medical 

School 

Architects 



Review of 

Preliminary 

Plans 



Site and 
Road Plans 



2624 



COMMITTEE 



Farm 

Services 

Building 



North Hadley 
Road 



Eastman Lane 



Review of 

Preliminary 

Plans - 

Continuing 

Education 

Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
acceptance of the Sasaki-Walker plans 
for site and road locations as pre- 
sented to the committee and as detailed 
in drawings on file in the Office of 
the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the University might re- 
gretfully have to request the University Building Authority to de- 
fer construction of a dormitory building they now have under design 
which sets over the corner of North Hadley Road. After further 
discussion, it was suggested that an early meeting be held between 
Messrs. Pumphret, Johnson, Hugill and the architect to resolve this 
problem. 

After brief review, and upon motion made and seconded, it 
was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of final plans for the Farm 
Services Building. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they request the town of Amherst 
to vacate and abandon to the University 
North Hadley Road. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that they request the town of Amherst to 
vacate and abandon to the University 
Eastman Lane. 

The committee then returned to the Student Union to take 
up item 3C on the agenda: Review of Preliminary Plans for the Con- 
tinuing Education Building. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, architect Breuer ex- 
plained the rationale for his conception of the Continuing Education 
Center. Mr. Breuer said he felt the solution was to let a good 
part of the building disappear under ground, hiding all of the 
complicated facades and leaving only a simple, clean design above 
ground. The elevated section would contain living quarters of the 
conference center, restaurant facilities, etc. High approval for 
the design concept was given by Dean Belluschi and by Mr. Sasaki, 
who also suggested outdoor food service at the terrace level in- 
cluding tables, umbrellas, etc. to make this area a truly functional 
and attractive one. 



it was 



After brief discussion, and upon motion made and seconded, 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they accept the preliminary plans for the 
Continuing Education Center as presented 
"by architect Marcel Breuer. 

After brief discussion concerning the transfer of ownership 
and legality of certain options on the property of Paul K. Winkler 
and upon motion made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they award the sum of $75,000 for the 
Paul K. Winkler property of approximately 
26 acres abutting the northeast corner of 
the campus, said property to be taken by 
eminent domain. 

Judge Blassberg next reported that a new sewer law will 
permit the Selectmen of Amherst to vote on any land taking, public 
or private, and to take an easement on the property taken. He 
indicated that this should solve the problem of the Stadium sewer. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that we are building a coal- 
handling facility on the Tillson Farm. He indicated that a small 
sliver of land on the Nelson property might be needed in order to 
get grading back to the track. It was suggested that Judge 
Blassberg look into this. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Dean Field reported on 
the views of the Master Planning Committee concerning a proposal 
by a private entrepreneur to develop certain land areas abutting 
the northwest section of the campus for fraternities. Dean Field 
reported that the view of the Master Planning Committee was that 
the University would be compromised if a private land developer 
were given such an option. The Master Planning Committee then 
voted to recommend that the University proceed to take and develop 
as it sees fit on its own the properties described in the so-called 
Rubin proposal. 

Discussion followed on the future role of fraternities 
and Dean Field indicated that he had available a long-term study on 
this matter and could make it available. At this point Judge 
Blassberg left the meeting. 

Dean Field stressed his feeling that any consideration of 
the future role of fraternities should have the study and considera- 
tion of a new Committee on Student Affairs of the Faculty Senate. 



2625 



it was 



After brief discussion, and upon motion made and seconded, 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

they accept the recommendation of the Master 
Planning Committee to acquire as soon as 
possible by eminent domain and as a part of 
the Master Plan the Ostrowski and Sheldon 
properties abutting the northwest corner of 
the campus. 



Acceptance of 
Continuing 
Education 
Building Plans 

Land 
Acquisition 



Winkler 
Property 



Stadium 

Sewer 



Coal 

Handling 

Facility 



The Rubin 
Proposal - 
Ostrowski & 
Sheldon 
Property 



Future of 
Fraternities 



2626 



Progress on 
UM/ Boston 
Building 



COMMITTEE 



Change in 
Committee 
Minutes of 
May 7 Meeting 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Treasurer Johnson reported that everything is proceeding 
satisfactorily with the UM/Boston building. Some bids have been 
put out. Some equipment has been ordered. A meeting will be held 
on June 3 with Gas Company officials to discuss final details of 
the switch over. All except the 11th, 12th and 13th floors are 
expected to be made available to the University prior to June 15. 
The Treasurer reported that the library had been relocated to the 
4th floor (air contioned) and that Student Personnel will move to 
the 5th floor. He indicated that lounge areas discussed at a 
previous meeting have been divided and placed in separate locations 
throughout the building so as to afford excellent opportunities for 
uninterrupted study and relaxation. 

Trustee Gordon recommended a change in minutes of the 
Buildings and Grounds Committee of the meeting of May 7, 1965. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To change the last two lines of the vote at 
the top of page 3 of the meeting of the Com- 
mittee on Buildings and Grounds of May 7, 
1965 to read as follows: "Such modification 
of such plans to provide additional library 
and study space as may be feasible." 

Treasurer Johnson suggested that a meeting of the Com- 
mittee on Buildings and Grounds be held on Jun 11, 1965 prior to 
the special meeting of the Board called for 12:30 on that same day. 



i 



The meeting was adjourned at 5:15 p.m. 



Respectfully submitted, 





Robert J f -^cCartney 
Secretary, "Board of Trustee 



i 



II 



COMMITTEE 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY 

AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

June 1, 1965, 12 Noon, Dukes Room, Student Union, Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley and Lyons; 
Provost Tippo and Secretary's 
Staff Assistant Miller 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Deans Moore, Spielman, 
Niederpruem and Kirshen; 
Professor Gagnon; Dr. Venman 



2627 



At the invitation of the Chairman, Professor Gagnon 
discussed the proposed adoption of a four-course program during 
the Freshman and Sophomore years at the University of Massachusetts- 
Boston. He also gave information on integration of English and 
History courses and on laboratory space requirements at the Boston 
Branch. Provost Tippo reported that response to the four-course 
idea had been favorable and asked for a general reaction of the 
committee on the proposal. After further discussion, the committee 
went on record as unanimously approving, in principle, the four- 
course proposal for UMass-Boston. 

After considerable discussion of individual items, it was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the approval of the new programs of 
study and individual courses as de- 
tailed in Document 65-073 which is 
attached and herewith made a part of 
these minutes. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:40 p.m. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Alan R. Mill 
Staff Assistant 
Secretary's Office 



2628 



COMMITTEE 



Medical 
S jhool 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

June 18, 1965, 10:30 a.m., Administration Building, 
Worcester State Hospital, Worcester, Massachusetts 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, Trustees Brown, 
Emerson and Gordon; Acting Presi- 
dent Tippo, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Trustees Croce and Maginnis; 
Dean Lamar Soutter of the 
University Medical School 
and Drs. Bardwell H. Flower 
and Richard W. Nelson of the 
Worcester State Hospital 
staff. 



Chairman Haigis opened the meeting by inviting comment 
from Dr. Flower of the Worcester State Hospital staff. Dr. Flower 
expressed pleasure that the City of Worcester had been designated 
by the Board of Trustees as the location of the Medical School, and 
offered every degree of cooperation to the Trustees in assisting 
them to determine an appropriate site. 

Dean Soutter indicated that the first problem was to de- 
termine a specific site. He listed the following as the most 
likely possibilities: 

a. Worcester City Hospital 

b. Fairlawn Hospital 

c. Worcester State Hospital 

Dean Soutter noted that the original survey had evaluated 
Worcester City Hospital and later had considered Fairlawn. However, 
he later became convinced that the Worcester State Hospital was the 
only site in the City of Worcester having sufficient acreage. He 
noted that it might be necessary to build a branch of the University 
where the Medical School was located. He described Clark University 
as the only graduate degree institution now adjacent in the city 
itself. 

Dean Soutter reported that he had talked to City Manager 
McGrath who was interested in the Worcester State site. It was 
pointed out that Worcester City Hospital would involve much urban 
renewal activity and a rebuilding of the hospital itself to 
accommodate it for teaching purposes. He reported that City Manager 
McGrath wished to meet with the committee at noon to express the 
views of the city government; also, that the Chamber of Commerce 
was anxious to help. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Maginnis handed out a series of folders and maps 
showing the Worcester north quadrangle and others detailing the 
various sites under consideration. 

Dean Soutter distributed a document detailing statistics 
on acreage and cost related to the proposed Worcester area sites. 

Discussion followed on the question of a proposed list 
of architects for the Medical School and it was moved, seconded 
and 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the Uni- 
versity, Kenneth W. Johnson, to set up 
interviews with the following list of 
architects drawn from a list presented 
by Dean Belluschi of Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology: 

1. Hugh Stubbins in association with 
Smith, Hinchman and Grylls. 

2. Campbell & Aldrich in association 
with Rosenfield and Rosenfield of 
New York 

3. Architects Collaborative plus 
Ellerbe 

4. Curtis and Davis of New York 

5. Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson and 
Abbott 

Treasurer Johnson raised the question of whether any park 
land might be available adjacent to the Worcester State Hospital 
and it was suggested that this question be explored with City 
Manager McGrath. 

At this point the Trustees adjourned for a recess for an 
automobile tour of the prospective Worcester area sites including 
the following: 

a. Worcester State Hospital 

b. Worcester City Hospital 

c . Fair lawn Hospital 

The meeting was reconvened by the Chairman at Worcester 
Municipal Airport where the Trustees took lunch. 

In further discussion the Trustees emphasized that a 
minimum of 150 acres would be required for an acceptable site, and 
the suggestion was made that the committee could go as far at this 
time as "expressing interest" to Commissioner Solomon in his offer 
of 150 acres. 



2629 



Tour of 
Possible 

re ester 
Area Sites 
for a Medical 
School 



:630 



COMMITTEE 



Other 
Business 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman Haigis pointed out that much more information 
would be required, for example, on the availability of adjacent 
park land. 

Discussion followed on the possibility of obtaining test 
borings at the Worcester State Hospital site prior to the meeting 
of the Board of Trustees on July 7. Treasurer Johnson suggested 
bringing in Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates, Inc. to evaluate the 
site and recommend where the borings should be made. 

Trustee Gordon emphasized speed in getting as much done 
as possible between now and the July 7 meeting of the Board so 
that the matter could be recommended to the Board at that meeting. 

There was also discussion of a report giving proposed 
sites in V/orcester, Massachusetts for the Medical School, This was 
prepared by the Medical School Coordinating Committee of the 
Worcester Area Chamber of Commerce. 

The committee, after appropriate discussion, agreed to 
set the date of Thursday, July 8, 1965 for the next meeting of the 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds. The agenda would consist of 
interviewing architects. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the University is moving 
as quickly as possible toward the establishment of an educational 
television facility with Federal matching funds. A recent engineer- 
ing survey indicated that Mount Lincoln would be inappropriate for 
this facility, and that it should be established on Mt. Tom. He 
reported that the mountain top is involved in joint ownership be- 
tween Mr. Charles DeRose and Mr. Daniel O'Connell with WHYN-TV 
(channel 4-0) already established there. Channel 58 (UHF) has now 
been assigned by the Federal Communications Commission to Amherst. 
The Treasurer stated that the committee would have to consider very 
shortly the question of whether or not the proposed University 
facility should be tied in with private land owners. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:00 p.m. 



}fully submitted. 




Robert J. M'cCsirtney 
Secretary, ^ard of Trustees 




COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY 

AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

July 7, 1965, 9:30 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT: Chairman Troy, Provost Tippo; Trustees Crowley, 
Haigis, Lyons, Weld on; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney 

The meeting v/as called to order by the Chairman. He 
explained that Senate committees and University committees had 
duplicated in the past, and that it was now proposed to reduce 
some of these committees, eliminating overlap, in a series of pro- 
posed Faculty Senate Constitution amendments. 

After brief discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of the proposed amendments to the 
Constitution of the University of Massa- 
chusetts Faculty Senate as detailed in 
Document 66-001, which document is here?/ith 
attached to and made part of these minutes. 

A brief discussion followed on a memorandum from the 
Graduate Office to Provost Tippo detailing support for a proposed 
program for a Master of Arts in Anthropology. This program was 
recommended by Dean Edward C. Moore of the Graduate School. 

After brief discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve a program for a Master of Arts 
in Anthropology as detailed in Document 66-002, 
which document is herewith attached to and 
made part of these minutes. 

Discussion followed on the question of permitting faculty 
members in the College of Agriculture presently on eleven month 
appointments to revert to the nine month appointment basis at a 
15% salary cut with funds thus materialized to revert to the 
central University funds. Provost Tippo indicated that some agri- 
cultural faculty members were interested in such a plan. 

The discussion concluded without any vote being taken. 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:30 a.m. 

Respectfully submitted 

tir u -" 

Robert J. |3cCarxney 
Secretary, ^fioard of Trustees 




2631 



Faculty 
Senate 

Constitution 
Amendments 



M.A. Degree in 
Anthropology 



Nine Month 
Appointments , 
College of 
Agriculture 



26 



*>6 



COMMITTEE 



Investments 



Designation 
of Bank 
UM/Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF METING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
July 7, 1965, 10:30 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Healey, Provost Tippo; Trustees 
Emerson, Gordon, Pumphret and Troy; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Mr. John Y/ood and Mr. Ted Ladd of the 
firm of Standish, Ayer & Y/ood, Inc. 

Discussion began with item //2 on the agenda. Mr. Ted 
Ladd and Mr. John Y/ood of the firm of Standish, Ayer & V/ood, Inc. 
explained that $27,000 in cash was now available in the Endowment 
Funds. As investment counselors they recommended that these funds 
be put to work by placing them into bonds with lower coupon ratings 
to avoid the present high rate of call. 

After brief discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To sell and purchase bonds in accordance with 
the schedule in Document 66-004 which is here- 
by made a part of these minutes. 

Treasurer Johnson introduced to the meeting letters from 
representatives of the National Shawmut Bank, dated April 14, 1965; 
and from the State Street Bank and Trust Company, dated May 12, 
1965 and May 25, 1965, each offering banking services to the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts/Boston. 

Committee Chairman Healey noted that he had been talked 
to by representatives of nearly every bank in Boston. He noted the 
difficulty of making a choice. The test of proximity is frequently 
used, he said. 

Trustee Troy queried whether the services of the various 
banks were relatively similar or parallel. 

Treasurer Johnson noted that the State Street Bank and 
Trust Company offers one additional benefit. They will perform 
the messenger service. It is also the closest bank being located 
in the Statler Hilton Hotel. 

After brief discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the State Street Bank and Trust Company of 
Boston, Massachusetts be designated as the 
bank to handle accounts for UM/Boston. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



NIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Treasurer Johnson presented a schedule of tuition and 
fees for students attending UM/Boston. The tuition would be the 
same as in Amherst hut the fees would be less due to its being a 
commuting campus. 

In essence, the fee structure would be that all students 
carrying a full load would get full tuition billing; all others 
(regardless of their category as a part-time student) would be 
billed at half amount ($50.00 per term or semester). The Treasurer 
indicated that Chancellor Ryan wished to review this practice after 
the first year to determine whether it might be possible later on 
to establish a one-quarter amount billing charge for part-time 
students enrolled for only one course. 

In terms of fees, a flat $15.00 would be set for full- 
time students, and a $10.00 fee for all other part-time categories. 
This should enable UM/Boston to have funds to sponsor student 
activities and cultural programs. 

The Treasurer noted that the University had been able to 
work out a flat $30.00 per annum charge for Blue Cross-Blue Shield 
membership on an optional basis for UM/Boston students. After 
brief discussion, and upom motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the schedule of fees for UIvl/Boston set 
forth in Document 66-005 be established, which 
document is herewith attached and made part 
of these minutes. 

It was further 



VOTED: 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve a student health plan for UM/ 
Boston involving an optional fee charge of 
$30.00 for a full year for membership in 
the Massachusetts Blue Cross-Blue Shield 
plan for UM/Boston students 



/O • 



Treasurer Johnson reviewed with members of the Committee 
the Trust Fund Operating Budgets proposed for the fiscal year 
June 27, 1965 to June 25, 1966. He pointed out that these budgets 
are usually adopted at the beginning of each fiscal year. At this 
point, however, the University has no state fund operating budget 
for this year, and the Treasurer expressed the hope that the Board 
of Trustees would approve a "hold-the-line 11 state fund operating 
budget at their meeting later today. 

Discussion followed on various items set forth in the 
Trust Fund Operating Budgets (Document 66-006). 

After due discussion, and upon motion made and seconded, 
it v/as unanimously 



2633 



UM/Boston 
Fees 



Trust Fund 

Operating 

Budgets, 

June 27, 1965- 

June 25, 1966 



2634 



COMMITTEE 



New Endowment 
Funds 



Addison H. 
Clark Loan 
Fund 



Oswald Behrend 
Award Fund 



Trust Fund In- 
terest Account- 
Cash Variance 
Written Off 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
adoption of the Trust Fund Operating 
Budgets for the Fiscal Year June 27, 1965 
to June 25, 1966 as set forth in Document 
66-006, which document is herewith attached 
to and made part of these minutes. 

Treasurer Johnson indicated that the Committee should, 
after review and discussion, recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the acceptance of two new endowment funds. 



it was 



After due discussion, and upon motion made and seconded, 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the ADDISON H. CLARK MEMORIAL LOAN FUND 
be established as an Endowment Fund in the 
amount of $18,987.08 with the principal and 
income from said fund available for loans to 
industrious and deserving students of the 
University. 

After further discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the establishment of the 
OSWALD BEHREND AWARD FUND in the amount of 
$946.00, less the cost of the permanent 
trophy, the income from said fund be used 
to provide for an annual award to that sports 
participant whose courage and desire results 
in his achievement that exemplifies the very 
best and in keeping with the wonderful 
sportsmanship of Mr. Behrend, with any 
excess income earned added to principal. 

After brief discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they write off to Trust Fund interest a 
cash variance shortage of $11.68 for the 
fiscal year 1964-65. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:12 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted, 




Robert J . '. 
Secretary, 



II 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 

AND GROUNDS 

July 8, 1965, 9:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT: Chairman Haigis, Provost Tippo; Trustees 
Brown, Emerson, Gordon and Thompson; 
Chancellor Ryan, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



2635 



Dean Soutter; Planning Officer Littlefield; 
Mr. Richardson and Mr. Clapp of the firm 
of SHEPLEY, BULFINCH, RICHARDSON AND ABBOTT; 
Mr. Hugh Stubbins of HUGH STUBBINS ASSOCIATES; 
Mr. Robert Hastings and Mr. James Livingston 
of SMITH, HINCHMAN AND GRYLLS; Mr. Aldrich 
and Mr. Nulty of CAMPBELL, ALDRICH AND NULTY, 
and Messrs. Rosenfield and Mr. Sterling of 
ROSENFIELD AND ROSENFIELD; also Mr. O'Brien, 
Mr. Rooney, Mr. Terkuhle and Mr. Johnson of 
CURTIS AND DAVIS; also Mr. Harkness and Mr. 
Fletcher of ARCHITECTS COLLABORATIVE and 
Mr. Ellerbe and Mr. Henslen of ELLEEBE 
ASSOCIATES . 



The meeting was called to order at 9:15 am. by Chairman 
Haigis who stated that the purpose was to interview a number of 
nationally prominent architects eligible to be considered for 
design work in connection with the University Medical School and 
Hospital. 

Chairman Haigis extended a welcome to Mr. Richardson and 
Mr. Clapp representing the firm of SHEPLEY, BULFINCH, RICHARDSON 
AND ABBOTT. 

Mr. Richardson stated that his firm did not specialize 
in hospital design; yet, approximately one-third or so of the 
work undertaken by SHEPLEY, BULFINCH, RICHARDSON AND ABBOTT, falls 
in this area. He stated that the firm wished to vary their 
practice. He introduced Mr. Clapp who has worked on hospital 
design, but who was not a specialist. He indicated that the firm 
had approximately 31 registered architects employed in their offices 

Mr. Richardson continued that his firm was now doing a 
large hospital in Cincinnati, at a cost of approximately 17 
million dollars. This facility is now under construction. It 
"came in" under the appropriation. His firm also is involved in 
designing work for the City Hospital in Cambridge, Massachusetts; 
also the Hartford (Connecticut) Hospital addition, and the Rhode 
Island Hospital. 



Medical 
School 



Interview with 
representatives 
of Shepley, 
Bulfinch, 
Richardson & 
Abbott 



2636 



COMMITTEE 



Interview with 
representatives 
of Hugh 

Stubbins, also 
Smith, Hinchraan 
and Grylls 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



There followed extensive discussion concerning various 
projects handled by SHERLEY, BULFINCH, RICHARDSON AND ABBOTT, 
stressing their capacity to take on additional work at this time; 
also their arrangements with engineering and electrical sub- 
contractors. 

Treasurer Johnson queried whether the firm included in 
their general fee the cost of preparing applications for federal 
government grants. 

Mr. Clapp replied that, at Dartmouth, the program was 
prepared at an extra fee. 

The Treasurer recalled that, when the firm did Bartlett 
Hall for the University, an extra fee was required for the 
programming study. 

Mr. Clapp replied that his firm would endeavor to do 
everything they could to help the University and would be able to 
prepare applications for federal grants as a part of their basic 
fee. 

The Chairman welcomed Mr. Hugh Stubbins of STUBBINS 
ASSOCIATES; also Mr. Robert Hastings and Mr. James Livingston of 
SMITH, HINCHMAN AND GRYLLS. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Mr. Stubbins stated 
the qualifications of his firm. He indicated that no credentials 
were needed since STUBBINS ASSOCIATES were already doing work for 
the University. He pointed out that the firm of SMITH, HINCHMAN 
AND GRYLLS were architects and engineers from Detroit. They 
specialize in laboratory buildings, hospitals and medical education 
facilities as well as office and industrial buildings. 

Approximately ^0% of the work undertaken by SMITH, 
HINCHMAN AND GRYLLS is in the medical education field. Thus, Mr. 
Stubbins noted, they are able to attract key people to their aid 
who are real experts in this field. The Medical School of the 
University of Massachusetts will be so complex that a design team 
will be required. Mr. Stubbins then introduced Mr. Hastings of 
SMITH, HINCHMAN AND GRYLLS to expand on collaborative experiences 
he has had with other clients. 

Mr. Hastings demonstrated on a chart the interlocking 
team effort required to design such specialized facilities as a 
medical school-teaching hospital complex. He indicated that 300 to 
4-00 persons would be involved. 

Mr. Livingston was introduced next to illustrate specific 
hospitals and medical facilities which his firm had handled in the 
past. 



i 



i 



] 



COMMITTEE 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Among the facilities illustraaed were the Wayne County 
General Hospital, a supplementary teaching hospital affiliated 
with the University of Michigan; Garden City Hospital in Garden 
City, Michigan; the University of Louisville; also, the National 
Cancer Institute, which is a part of NIH; also a 500-bed primary 
teaching hospital at Howard University in Washington, D.C. 

Next to be illsutrated was the aerospace medical division, 
USAF, a 32,000 square foot facility for evaluation of returned 
moon specimens. 

Discussion followed on the availability of both firms in 
collaboration to take on additional work at this time. Treasurer 
Johnson queried whether the basic design fee would include the cost 
for federal applications, etc. 

Mr. Stubbins responded that the program, schematics and 
HR-12 forms would be on a cost basis - the firm's cost plus two and 
a half times their payroll. 

Mr. Hastings added that HR-12 applications are tremendous- 
ly complex at this stage, and would, hopefully, become more simple 
later on. He indicated that the University of Louisville had spent 
$150,000 in fees on basic schematics plus the HR-12 forms. 

Trustee Thompson queried whether the combination of firms 
on architectural design would increase the cost. 

Mr. Stubbins responded that there would be no extra cost; 
that the work v/ould be charged up to the same basis as though one 
architectural firm were involved. He indicated that the University 
would have as much of his personal time as would be required to get 
the job done, that his firm had the present capacity to absorb the 
job and that he had not, to date, done work in conjunction with the 
Bureau of Building Construction. 

Trustee Thompson, diverting momentarily from discussion 
of the forthcoming Medical School facilities, queried Mr. Stubbins 
concerning a tunnel design related to the Southwest Dormitory 
complex, a project for which he is already engaged at the University 
A question was raised concerning possible rowdyism in a 100-foot 
tunnel at a point where the Southwest project cuts beneath widened 
North Hadley Road. Mr. Stubbins responded that the tunnel will cut 
across almost at grade level and that a bridge at this point would 
be impossible. The intention will be to make a raised highway 
appear like a bridge at this point, and to widen the opening so 
that it will not look like a tunnel. The opening will be fitted 
out with appropriate lighting so that it takes on the general 
characteristics of a v/ide corridor in a building. 

After brief discussion, and upon motion by Trustee 
Thompson, it was seconded and 



2637 



Consultation 
with Sasaki, 
Dawson, DeMay 
Associates, 
Inc. re South- 
west Dormitory 
Project - 
Tunnel 



2638 



COMMITTEE 



Interview with 
representatives 
of Campbell, 
Aldrich and 
Nulty; also 
Rosenfield & 
Rosanfield 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To have appropriate officials of the Uni- 
versity, together with Mr. Stubbins, con- 
sult with the firm of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay 
Associates, Inc. so that an appropriately 
widened and lighted corridor-like tunnel 
might he constructed at the point of inter- 
section of this facility with North Hadley 
Road, adjacent to the Southwest Dormitory 
complex . 

Chairman Haigis introduced Mr. Aldrich and Mr. Nulty of 
CAMPBELL, ALDRICH AND NULTY and the Messrs. Rosenfield and Sterling 
of ROSENFIELD AND ROSENFIELD. 

Mr. Aldrich indicated that his firm would be willing to 
enter into a temporary partnership with Rosenfield and Rosenfield 
to design a Medical School for the University of Massachusetts. 
His firm has been in business for twenty years. He stressed the 
quality and imaginative design achieved by his staff in much of the 
educational work which they had accomplished. The Rosenfields, he 
said, are outstanding in the United States in hospital and medical 
field design, whereas his own firm is not experienced in this 
field. In combination, he felt, both firms could add fresh ideas, 
enabling them to contribute a novel but practical design for the 
University Medical School. The plan would be to establish a 
project headquarters at CAMPBELL, ALDRICH AND NULTY with a full- 
time project manager assigned. Messrs. Aldrich, Nulty and 
Rosenfield would be available personally to the University at all 
times. He indicated a two-stage project to facilitate the Medical 
School design: 

First Stage : to make a program, written as well as 
graphic. Appropriate spaces would be assigned. This would involve 
a joint effort with the University. A master plan would be evolved, 
primarily written, but also including graphics. There would be an 
open and closed space study, utility study, and projections for 
landscaping, etc. 

Stage Two : building design, schematics, preliminaries, 
bid documents, etc. 

Mr. Aldrich concluded that collaboration is nothing new 
for CAMPBELL, ALDRICH AND NULTY; ROSENFIELD AND ROSENFIELD have 
also collaborated previously. 

Mr. Aldrich then introduced Ma-. Isidore Rosenfield, 
winner of 15 design awards, author of two books and eighty articles 
who is now writing a two-volume book, lecturer in medical facility 
planning at Yale, M.I.T., etc., and senior partner of ROSENFIELD 
AND ROSENFIELD. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



University of Massachusetts 



Mr. Rosenfield indicated that his firm approaches 
planning in the following manner: 

!• Social an d Community Meeds (Demographic): This 
leads to a schematic master plan with estimate of costs. 

2. Economics : Every dollar spent is spent to a purpose 
and with great care. 

3. Medical : To create an instrumentality for teaching 
and learning . 

4. Aesthetics : Every citizen worker must enjoy working 
in the facility; every patient must enjoy sojourning there. 

5. Tec hnological : This phase allows for growth, 
changes in expansion for the indefinite future. 

Mr. Rosenfield indicated that his firm stresses the 
principle of contiguity. This envisions the concept that an in- 
stitution is great by virtue of the people and the personalities 
in it. The institution must have a philosophy and objectives. 
There must be an opportunity for personal communication between 
these minds. Certain departments, for example, need to be next to 
each other. The principle of contiguity suggests horizontal con- 
struction. 

Mr. Rosenfield proceeded to demonstrate this effect on 
a number of exhibits: (a) Griffin Hospital, Derby, Connecticut; 

(b) Holyoke Hospital, Kolyoke, Massachusetts; (c) Worcester City 
Hospital, Worcester, Massachusetts; (d) New York State Veterinary 
College, Cornell University; (e) Puerto Rico Medical Center, the 
Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. 

Mr. Aldrich then resumed charge of the discussion and 
displayed further visuals, as follows: (a) the Jackson Laboratory, 
Bar Harbor, Maine; (b) the Master Plan of the Exeter School; 

(c) the Graduate Research Center, University of Massachusetts; 
(e) the Tufts Memorial Library; (f) the Simmons Library. 

Trustee Emerson queried v/hether ROSENFIELD AND ROSENFIELD 
had collaborated in the past, and with whom. 

Mr. Rosenfield responded that, in work for the USAF in 
the Philippines, his firm had collaborated with a Honolulu architect 
for a facility in Pakistan, with architects in Lahore. 

There followed general discussion concerning the abilitj^ 
of the firm to take on additional work at this time. Provost 
Tippo queried whether, in view of the fact that CAMPBELL, ALDRICH 
AND NULTY were already handling the Administration Building and 
the Graduate Research Center at the University, they could take on 
additional work. He added that there had been complaints of 
slowness in both of these projects. 



2639 



2640 



COMMITTEE 



Interview with 
representatives 
of the firm of 
Curtis & Davis 



UNBVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Aldrich responded that the delays were not 
attributalbe to his firm. He indicated that the difficulty was 
with the Bureau of Building Construction where contracts remain for 
months without being signed. Treasurer Johnson confirmed this. 

At this time the Committee recessed for lunch. 

Chairman Haigis introduced Messrs. O'Brien, Rooney, 
Turkuhle and Johnson of the firm of CURTIS AND DAVIS. 

Mr. Rooney stated that his firm had been organized in 
New Orleans, Louisiana, in 1946. It is now practicing on a 
national scale and maintains offices in New York City. 

Mr. Rooney stated that his firm keeps one of the princi- 
pals directly involved at all times, from the concept to the turn- 
ing over of the key. He illustrated this by chart. There is a 
job captain to coordinate all functions and operations. Special 
color consultants are utilized. As an illustration, he demonstrated 
their work at the Berlin (Germany) Medical Center. He indicated 
that this color traffic patterning procedure was of pscyhological 
importance in helping with circulation patterns. 



job: 



CURTIS AND DAVIS proceeded as follows in organizing a 



1. Research - location, environment, technical, 

structural, materials, cost, space 

2. Programming - general requirements, outline 

program, detail program, con- 
ference, project analysis, design 
philosophy, design requirements, 
diagramatic relationship, critical 
path method 



3. Design 

Function 



architectural, mechanical, 
electrical, structural 



4. Aesthetics 

Working Drawings 



architects, landscape 
architects, decorator, 
specifications: electrical 
mechanical, structural, 
civil, consultants 



5. Supervision - consultation, inspection, bids, 

contracts, shop drawings, 
materials 



I 



COMMITTEE 



II 



I 



2641 



IVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Rooney indicated that, in a project the size of the 
University of Massachusetts Medical School, his firm would maintain 
a project office at the site. They would also employ the critical 
path method involving time schedules and controls. 

Treasurer Johnson queried Mr. Rooney concerning the 
Berlin Medical Center. Mr. Rooney responded that this was a 1500- 
bed teaching hospital located approximately 3 km from The Wall. 
The facility is located on a plot of approximately 7 1/2 acres, 
so the buildings had to be concentrated. The nurses home is 
completed. The hospital portion is now under construction. There 
will be parking facilities for approximately 3000 automobiles. He 
indicated that traffic flow charts had been developed, and that 
the overall cost of the entire project stands now at approximately 
70 million dollars, financed partly by The Franklin Fund and State 
Department sources. The intention is to handle approximately 1500 
medical school students there with a six-year course. 

Dr. Soutter queried whether other hospitals had been 
built by this firm and Mr. Rooney responded in the affirmative: 
six in all; on Hill-Burton Funds. 

Provost Tippo queried Y/hether any construction had been 
undertaken by the firm for a medical school as such. Mr. Rooney 
responded in the affirmative citing two science buildings for 
Tulane University. 

There followed further inquiry as to whether the firm 
could take on the job now if they were awarded the contract. Mr. 
Rooney indicated that the staff is presently 25, New York City; 
45, New Orleans, and Berlin, Germany, 3. Trustee Gordon queried 
whether any work had been undertaken by this firm in New England. 

Mr. Rooney responded in the affirmative indicating that 
they had undertaken libraries in Worcester, Cambridge, and Lynn, 
Massachusetts, and a prison in Maine. 

Treasurer Johnson queried whether the firm was registered 
in Massachusetts. Mr. Rooney responded in the affirmative. 
Planning Officer Littlefield queried whether they had had experience 
working with other architects. 

Mr. Rooney responded that they had, to date, worked only 
by themselves. This concluded the interview. 

Trustee Gordon introduced the name of Lewis Kahn of 
Philadelphia. He queried Dean Soutter on his reaction. The Dean 
indicated that he was not familiar with Mr. Kahn's work, but would 
ask Dean Belluschi about him as a possibility. 



2642 



COMMITTEE 



Interview with 
representatives 
of Architects 
Collaborative ; 
also Ellerbe 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Treasurer Johnson indicated that Mr. Kahn's name had 
come before the Committee previously, but that he had not been 
interviewed. He stated that he believed that Mr. Kahn was dropped 
from consideration with respect to the Medical School project be- 
cause he was not sufficiently specialized. 

Chairman Haigis introduced Messrs. Harkness and Fletcher 
of ARCHITECTS COLLABORATIVE and Messrs. Ellerbe and Henslen of 
ELLERBE. 

Mr. Fletcher stated that Mr. Ellerbe had previously done 
medical facilities at the University of Florida, the University of 
Kentucky, Tulane University, and the University of Rochester. His 
treatments have shown great flexibility. He is strong on detailing 
of equipment; he has a large group of specialists on his staff v/ho 
are able to help in programming, etc. He indicated that the ex- 
perience of ARCHITECTS COLLABORATIVE was equally broad. The latter 
firm has done many educational facilities designs, including build- 
ings at Harvard, Middlebury, and Williams College. They are deeply 
involved also in hospital design having handled Children's Hospital 
in Boston. They are also working on the Massachusetts Memorial and 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital facilities. 

Mr. Fletcher considered the design problems for the new 
Medical School as quite complex. He believes that the combined 
services of ARCHITECTS COLLABORATIVE with EL LE RBE would produce 
an excellent job. He introduced Mr. Ellerbe. 

Mr. Ellerbe indicated that his firm had been in business 
for approximately 55 years designing medical school centers during 
all of this period. An early client was the Mayo Clinic. His firm 
has done work at approximaely 150 hospitals all over the United 
States. They have designed buildings for medical schools for about 
a dozen medical schools at major institutions. He has a large staff 
of more than 300 fully integrated personnel, including persons 
responsible for specialized engineering services, etc. 

Additionally, Mr. Ellerbe stated that his firm employs 
specialists in every aspect of medical design. They have invented 
all kinds of gadgets and devised new techniques in medical archi- 
tecture. At the University of Kentucky, he stated, they were 
engaged even before the Dean arrived and they prepared detailed 
outlines and programs from the general statement of objectives 
advanced by the administration. When the Dean was hired, only a 
few changes were required. 

Another speciality of his firm is to make good facilities 
out of old ones. At the University of Rochester, renovations of 
this type will run to some 50 million dollars. He indicated that 
his firm was also engaged to double the size of the Georgetown Uni- 
versity hospital in Washington, D.C. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Ellerbe stressed the fact that no firm exceeds the 
experience of his own in hospital and medical school design work. 

In further illustration, Mr. Ellerbe continued that his 
firm was now constructing at Rochester, Minnesota, an experiment 
hospital involving several different kinds of nursing and ancillary 
units to determine once and for all which type of design is best. 
One innovation of his firm is the so-called Cloverlead (radial) 
hospital structure which has proven very successful in many 
locations. 

Trustee Haigis queried Mr. Ellerbe concerning the nature 
of previous collaborative associations. 

Mr. Ellerbe responded that, over the years, he had been 
tied in with more than 75 other firms under all varieties of 
arrangements designed to suit the client and the particular 
needs of the situation. 

Mr. Harkness observed that there would be one clearing 
house; both firms would be signators to the contract. The contact 
point would be in the Boston area. 

Trustee Emerson queried whether any consultants had been 
utilized beyond his firm in work related to the Tufts Medical 
Center . 

Mr. Fletcher responded that it is important that most 
work be done locally, especially as relates to administration of 
the job, although Ellerbe would be consulted as necessary. 

Trustee Thompson queried whether the collaboration 
between the two firms would cost any more. Mr. Ellerbe responded 
in the negative. 

Treasurer Johnson queried whether the programming and 
federal forms, etc., which had to be filled out would be 
accomplished at an extra fee or not. Mr. Ellerbe indicated that 
he was thinking of introducing this feature, but up to now had 
not done so. 

There followed a series of slides illustrating work 
which had been accomplished by both firms. 

At the conclusion of the slide presentation, Dean 
Soutter commented that the university of Kentucky School of 
Medicine is probably the best functionally designed school in the 
United States. This was designed by Mr. Ellerbe. 

Mr. Ellerbe concluded that this was an example of what 
his firm could do that other firms could not: an approach in 



2643 



2644 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

helping the client to select from all kinds of hospital designs, 
in order to suit their own particular needs. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:07 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted, 




Robert J. 
Secretary, 




ney 
of Trustees 




COMMITTEE 



UNDVERSBTY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

August 10, 1965, 10:00 a.m., City Hall, Worcester and 

on tour 



PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Emerson, Gordon 
and Thompson; Treasurer Johnson and 
Secretary McCartney. 



PRESENT by 
INVITATION 



Dean Soutter of the Medical School 
and Mr. Richard Galehouse of 
Sasaki, Dawson and DeMay. 



The Chairman convened the meeting in the Council Chamber 
at Worcester City Hall at 10:50 a.m. Present and representing the 
City of Worcester were City Manager Francis J. McGrath, Mayor Paul 
J. Mullaney, and Mr. Vincent M. Hynes, Commissioner of Public Works 
and Chief Engineer; also, Mr. Lewis Wald. Members of the committee 
and Worcester city officials together inspected several maps and 
one large aerial photograph which showed in detail the site 
features and aerial perspective of the property available at 
Worcester State Hospital. 

Discussion centered on whether Plantation Street 
(dividing the Worcester State Hospital site) is a major artery. 
City Manager McGrath responded that it was one of the Longest 
streets in Worcester, but was not considered a major artery traffic 

wise. 

Mr. Emerson queried what the attitude of the City of 
Worcester would be toward the possible transfer of any park land. 

City Manager McGrath responded that, as City Manager, he 
would consider it; however, it would require an act of the Legis- 
lature to change its use from recreational purposes in terms of the 
will which left the property to the City for such purposes. 

Further discussion centered on queries about contiguous 
properties abutting Green Hill; Notre Dame Home for the Elderly, 
the Fallon Clinic, etc. There followed extensive discussion con- 
cerning specific allocations of acreage adjoining the State 
Hospital land and the representatives of Sasaki, Dawson and DeMay 
made a presentation involving a hypothetical utilization of the 
Worcester State Hospital site for the Medical School, hospital and 
other ancillary health science facilities. City Manager McGrath 
pointed out that there was no other area of Worcester with so much 
open land available as the section surrounding the Green Hill area. 

The committee recessed the meeting for luncheon as guests 
of the representatives of the Worcester City government. Follow- 
ing luncheon, the meeting was reconvened by the Chairman and after 



2645 



Meeting with 
Officials of 
the City of 
Worcester 



2646 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the Medical School located in 
Worcester be designed as an integrated 
campus complex of buildings including 
the 4-00 bed teaching hospital by The 
Architects Collaborative of Cambridge 
associated with Ellerbe Architects of 
St. Paul, Minnesota and that this 
recommendation be transmitted to the 
Commissioner of Administration and 
Finance for appointment. Should these 
firms be unable to accept the commission, 
alternate recommendations would be in 
order: 

1. Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty of Boston 
associated with Rosenfield and Rosen- 
field of New York. 

2. Hugh Stubbins Associates of Boston 
associated with Smith, Hinchman and 
Grylls of Detroit. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
buildings in the southwest high rise 
dormitory complex should not be named 
individually, but that some appropriate 
name be designated for the entire complex. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
continued service of the Honorable Samuel 
Blassberg of Greenfield for legal services 
in connection with land acquisition in the 
Amherst area. 

The committee then recessed to City Hall where they re- 
joined host officials from the city government. 

There followed a detailed and thorough tour by automobile 
of the Worcester State Hospital site, together with contiguous 
properties after which the committee and Worcester officials returned 
to City Hall and the meeting was yaajqurned. 




Roiiert J. 
Secretary, 



' 



1 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

JOINT MEETING OF THE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF 
STUDY AND THE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

September 10, 1965, 10:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: Committee on Faculty and Program of 
Study : Chairman Troy, Trustees 
Haigis, Lyons and Plimpton. 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds : 
Chairman Haigis, Trustees Brown, 
Emerson, Gordon and Thompson. 
President Lederle, Provost Tippo, 
Treasurer Johnson and Secretary 
McCartney. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION : 



Dean Lamar Soutter of the Medical 
School; Messrs. Sasaki, Galehouse 
and Englar of the firm of Sasaki, 
Dawson, DeMay Associates, Inc. 



At the invitation of Chairman Troy, President Lederle 
read a Resolution on Medical School Faculty Salaries (Document 
66-018) which document is herewith attached to and made a part of 
these minutes. 

Dean Soutter reported to the committee that it is ex- 
tremely vital now for the Board of Trustees to take action on this 
resolution and pass it on to the Governor and the Legislature 
hopefully for their favorable consideration so that he can begin 
to recruit faculty for the School of Medicine. 

After brief discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
their endorsement of Document 66-018, 
a resolution on the necessity to have 
favorable legislative action on Bill 
S.lll, as originally filed, raising the 
limits of the present General State 
Salary Schedule from its present ceil- 
ing of $21,300 for members of the 
Medical School faculty and a limited 
number (2%) of other key administra- 
tors and faculty members. 

Chairman Troy next discussed a September 7, 1965 Presi- 
dent's Office memo to the Faculty and Program of Study Committee 
entitled "Plans for the Development of the Medical School and Re- 
cruitment of Faculty, September 1965;" (Document 66-019) which 
document is hereby attached to and made a part of these minutes; 



2647 



Faculty and 
Program of 
Study Committef 
Report 



Resolution 
on Salaries 



Medical School 
Development an 
Faculty Re- 
cruitment 



:648 



COMMITTEE 



Medical 
School 
Operating 
Budget, 1966 



Medical 
School 
Operating 
Budget, 1967 

Buildings 
and Grounds 
Committee 
Report 



Sasaki 

Evaluation of 
Worcester 
State Hospital 
Site 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

also Medical School budgets for fiscal year 1966 (Document 66-020) 
and fiscal year 1967 (Document 66-021) which documents are herewith 
attached to and made a part of these minutes. 

After extended discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the adoption of the Medical School 
budget for fiscal year 1966. totaling 
$352,216. (Document 66-020) 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the adoption of the Medical School 
budget for fiscal year 1967 (Document 
66-021) in the amount of $600,798. 

Chairman Haigis called upon Mr. Sasaki of the firm of 
Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates to give a summary of their 
evaluations of the Worcester State Hospital site, and Mr. Sasaki 
introduced Mr. Galehouse who gave the slide presentation. 

Mr. Galehouse indicated that approximately 300 acres of 
buildable land were available in the area under study. Comparisons 
were made with medical school facilities at the Universities of 
Virginia, Iowa and Rochester to test the feasibility of arrangement 
of building on the site. 

In summary, Mr. Galehouse indicated that the area at the 
Worcester State Hospital was large enough for the construction of 
a Medical School and ancillary facilities. The site has great 
natural beauty. It was recommended that the Trustees acquire as 
much land as might be feasible in order to guarantee adequate ex- 
pansion room in the future. This would involve approximately 150 
acres. 

Mr. Sasaki stated that properties along Belmont Avenue 
contiguous to the proposed site holdings held by the Commonwealth 
would need to be acquired for this area and would become our "front 
door". These are essential to making the entire site useable. 

Treasurer Johnson commented that Sasaki, Dawson and DeMay 
had prepared a well documented preliminary written progress report. 
(Copies were handed to each Trustee at the meeting). He indicated 
that the committee should recommend to the Board that they initiate 
legislation to transfer the appropriate Worcester State Hospital 
acreage, and other contiguous land parcels to the University, in 
the total of approximately 220 acres. It was agreed that the 
President and Treasurer would initiate such action including the 
amount of appropriations needed for contiguous lands. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After further discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the Worcester State Hospital lands, 
approximately 150 acres, offered by 
Commissioner Solomon of the Department 
of Mental Health be accepted and that 
the preliminary verbal recommendations 
of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates, Inc. 
be pursued with reference to such con- 
tiguous lands as might be appropriate. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the Capital Outlay Budget for the 
School of Medicine for 1965-66 be 
adopted at the adjusted total of 
$2,432,000. 



I 






Robert (J. /McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trusi/ee/ 




2649 



Designation 
of Medical 
School Site 



1965 Medical 

School 

Capital 

Outlay 

Budget 



2650 



COMMITTEE 



Approval of 
Preliminary 
Plans 



Pedestrian 
Tunnel 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
September 25, 1965, 10:00 a.m., President's Office, U of M 



PRESENT: Trustees Haigis, Brown, Emerson, 
Thompson; President Lederle, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney, Provost Tippo, Mr. Hugill, 
Dean Field, Chancellor Ryan 

The committee met in the Howard Johnson Room in the New 
Addition of the Food Science and Technology Building. The 
committee was very pleased to recognize the gift of Mr. Howard 
Johnson of the interior decoration and furnishings of this beautiful 
conference room. 

The committee examined in detail the preliminary plans, 
specifications, and cost estimates of the Pedestrian Tunnel to the 
Southwest Dormitory Area, the Continuing Education Center, the Fine 
Arts Building, and the Psychology Addition to Bartlett Hall. The 
committee had examined each of these projects in earlier stages of 
design and had previously met with the architects on the Continuing 
Education Building and Fine Arts Building. 

The Pedestrian Tunnel to the Southwest Complex had been 
redesigned by Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates at the request of 
Hugh Stubbins and the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority. The Pedestrian Tunnel is essential to move nearly 6,000 
students from the Southwest Dormitory Area to the main campus with- 
out crossing the major approach road to the campus. The new design 
is aesthetically pleasing although much more expensive, estimated 
to cost $14.0,000. It was recommended that the Building Authority and 
Hugh Stubbins be informed of the approval of the new tunnel. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the design of the new Pedestrian 
Tunnel, as prepared by Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay Associates, be accepted. 

It was further 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they approve the invoice for re- 
design fee of the tunnel by Sasaki, 
Dawson, DeMay Associates in the amount 
of $2,392.37, this being a fundamental 
change under the contract at the re- 
quest of the Trustees. 

After examining in detail the preliminary plans for the 
Continuing Education Center, it was 



I 



COMMITTEE 



2651 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the preliminary study for the Con- 
tinuing Education Center, as prepared 
by Marcel Breuer, be approved. 

The Trustees next considered the plans for the Fine Arts 
Building. At an earlier meeting the models of the building had 
been examined in detail. It was noted by the President that the 
seating capacity of the auditorium and concert hall was only about 
2,200 whereas it was hoped that it would be from 2,400-2,600. It 
was also noted that the theater had about 700 seats whereas it was 
hoped that this figure might also be higher. It was requested that 
the administration check with the architects to determine if it 
were possible to increase the seating within the framework of the 
budget . 

The preliminary plans for the Psychology Addition to 
Bartlett Hall were reviewed. It was agreed that this building 
would provide desirable additional facilities, not only for 
Psychology but also classrooms and offices that were essential to 
the College of Arts and Sciences. It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the preliminary plans for the 
Psychology Addition to Bartlett Hall, 
as prepared by Coletti Brothers, be 
approved. 

The committee discussed the method of presenting these 
and other building projects to the Trustees. It was felt that the 
size and complexity of the building program was such that it de- 
served a special meeting of the Trustees where the architects might 
be present to show their plans . It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they hold a special meeting of 
the Board for the purpose of receiving 
recommendations from the Buildings and 
Grounds Committee and from architects 
who are designing buildings for the 
University. 

Dean Field reported that he had reviewed with the 
residential college group and student personnel officers the earlier 
Trustees' comments about naming buildings in the Southwest Complex. 
It is strongly urged that the name be placed on each residential 
house so as to properly identify it for those living therein. He 
is preparing a long list of suggested names that may be used for 
future buildings. It was the unanimous recommendation of all con- 
sulted that the four completed low-rise buildings in the Southwest 
Dormitory Complex be named for distinguished men of letters: 
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Hermai Melville and 
William James. 



Continuing 

Education 

Center 



Fine Arts 
Building 



Bartlett 
Hall - 
Addition 



Naming of 

Southwest 

Dormitory 

Complex 

Buildings 



2652 



COMMITTEE 



Utility 
Services 

Completed 



Food 

Technology 

Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman read two communications from the University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority relative to naming of buildings. 
These were discussed in length and Trustee Thompson agreed to re- 
port back to the Building Authority. The committee was in agree- 
ment that they welcome recommendations from the Building Authority 
at any time. It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the four occupied low-rise dormi- 
tories in the Southwest Dormitory 
Complex designated A, B, C, and D be 
named Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David 
Thoreau, Henry Melville, and William 
James. 

Mr. Hugill reported that utility systems work had been 
completed on three projects in accordance with the plans and 
specifications. It was 



VOTED: 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the approval of completed projects: 



Contract 6B 
Contract 2 
Contract 3 



Additions to the Steam and 
Electrical Distribution Systems 
Improvements to Steam Generating 
and Distribution System 
Additions to Electrical Distri- 
bution System. 



Treasurer Johnson reported that there had been a pre- 
liminary inspection by the Bureau of Building Construction and the 
University of the Additions and Alterations to the Food Technology 
Building on April 22, 1965. The University had partially occupied 
the building although alterations were still going on in the old 
part of the building. Dr. Esselen, Head of the Department, had re- 
ported to the Treasurer that the ventilating and air-conditioning 
system for the building had never been adjusted satisfactorily and 
that the building was almost impossible to live in during the warm 
weather of the past two weeks; in addition, there were other punch- 
list items that had not been cleaned up. The committee instructed 
the Treasurer to notify the Bureau of Building Construction that 
they would not accept the building, as completed, until the 
ventilation and air-conditioning had been corrected and placed in 
proper operating condition and that other punch- list items had been 
satisfactorily taken care of. 

With the occupancy of four dormdtories in the Southwest 
Complex and anticipation of permanent financing of the project by 
the University of Massachusetts Building Authority, it was 



VOTED: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

That the following schedule of rates, 
fees, rentals and other charges for 
the use of accommodations in the dormi- 
tories being constructed by University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority 
pursuant to written request made by 
authority of the Trustees of the Uni- 
versity February 12, 1963, said dormi- 
tories being included in the Fourth 
Project of the Authority, be and here- 
by is approved, namely: 



Student Accommodations 



Semester 


$175.00 






15 Weeks 


164.00 


7 Weeks 


$77.00 


14 Weeks 


153.00 


6 Weeks 


66.00 


13 Weeks 


142.00 


5 Weeks 


55.00 


12 Weeks 


131.00 


4 Weeks 


44.00 


11 Weeks 


120.00 


3 Weeks 


33.00 


10 Weeks 


109.00 


2 Weeks 


22.00 


9 Weeks 


98.00 


1 Week 


11.00 


8 Weeks 


87.00 


Per Day 


1.60 



"Heads of Residence" Faculty Apartments 
$30.00 per month 
provided, that the above schedule for student 
accommodations shall be modified for the 
academic year commencing September, 1965 to 
be as follows: 

Student Accommodations 



Semester 


$150.00 


7 Weeks 


$65.00 


15 Weeks 


140.00 


6 Weeks 


56.00 


14 Weeks 


131.00 


5 Weeks 


47.00 


13 Weeks 


121.00 


4 Weeks 


37.00 


12 Weeks 


112.00 


3 Weeks 


28.00 


11 Weeks 


103.00 


2 Weeks 


19.00 


10 Weeks 


93.00 


1 Week 


9.00 


9 Weeks 


84.00 






8 Weeks 


75.00 







provided, further, that the rate per student 
occupying a student accommodation to which 
more than the design number of students are 
assigned shall be 80% of the pertinent rate 
above stated for the period during which such 
condition shall continue. 

It was also pointed out that the Stadium was now in use 
and that the permanent financing was being undertaken by the 
Building Authority. The committee was most pleased with the 
progress made by the Building Authority in completing these 
projects on time and 



2653 



Student Room 
Rents 

Southwest 
Dormitory 
Complex 



Fourth 
Project 



26 



r, 



COMMITTEE 



Athletic 
Fee 



Vending 
Machines 

Student 
Automatic 
Service 
(Trust Fund) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

VOTED ; That there be and hereby is approved 
the allocation out of each athletic 
fee paid by students at the University 
the sum of $8.00 as the fee for use of 
the outdoor event structure constructed 
by University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority pursuant to written request 
made by authority of the Trustees 
February 12, 1963 and included in the 
Fourth Project of said Authority. 

The Treasurer also indicated that it would be necessary 
to have rates established for the Southwest Dining Hall Project 
No. 5 at the Trustee meeting on October 16. He is conferring with 
legal counsel in having a proper vote prepared. 

The President reviewed the history of the operation of 
vending machines on the campus. This has been handled for many 
years, on authorization of the Trustees, by the Athletic Council. 
It is now desirable, with the development of residential colleges, 
to broaden the concept of the vending machine operation. The 
President presented a report, dated September 24, 1965, that the 
committee reviewed in detail. It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that all revenue derived from the opera- 
tion of the vending machines since 
July 1, 1965 be transferred from the 
Athletic Trust Fund and the Vending 
Machine Income Account (Temporary Trust 
Fund) to the Student Automatic Service 
(Trust Fund) account; that the Dean of 
Students be and hereby is authorized to 
administer said fund; and that disburse- 
ments from the fund, in the order of 
priority, shall provide for: 

1. Salaries for personnel assigned to the 
program. 

2. Transfer annually to the Athletic Trust 
Fund for scholarships to be granted to 
needy and worthy students as budgeted. 

3. Transfer of all remaining funds to the 
Residential Halls Cultural Enrichment 
Program. 

The committee had on its agenda a number of items that it 
sould not consider due to the lateness of the hour. These included 
a proposal of Mr. Rubin to build graduate housing - northwest of 
the campus, progress report on the Medical School site in 
Worcester, consideration of policy and procedures for permanent 
location for UMass/Boston, educational planning for the Northwest 



2655 



COMMITTEE 



UN5VERS8TY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Residential Halls complex, and a review of progress reports on all 
building projects, including agenda of problems that are being 
discussed with the Bureau of Building Construction. Mr. Hugill 
handed out copies of the progress report and the agenda material 
but there was not time to review it in detail. 



The meeting was adjourned at 12:05 p.m. 



Respe 




lly submitted, 



Robert J. 
Secretary, 




;ney 
of Trustees 




COMMITTEE 



Oxford, 
Bologna 
Summer 
Programs 



Medical 

School 

Development 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY 

AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

October 15, 1965, 12 Noon, Dukes Room, Student Union, Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle, 
Provost Tippo; Trustees Crowley, 
Haigis, Plimpton; Secretary *s 
Staff Assistant Miller 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Chancellor Ryan, Dean Soutter, 
Professors Hofer, Quint, 
Me lien; Dr. Venman 



The meeting was called to order by the Chairman. 
Dr. Tippo introduced Professor Mellen, who recently was named 
Chairman of the Faculty Senate Committee on Academic Matters which 
replaces the Course of Study Committee under the new constitution 
of the Faculty Senate. 

Professor Hofer of the English Department discussed 
various aspects of the Oxford Summer Seminar including staffing, 
curriculum, travel, enrolLnent, financial aid and housing. Pro- 
fessor Quint of the History Department outlined the Summer Session 
at Bologna. Following discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they approve the proposal to 
establish The Oxford, England, Summer 
Seminar (Document 66-026) and a pro- 
posal to establish the University of 
Massachusetts Summer School in Bologna, 
Italy (Document 66-027 said documents 
herewith being attached to and made a 
part of these minutes. 

Chairman Troy called attention to Dean Soutter' s paper on 
"Matters of Policy Needing Early Decisions by the Trustees" 
(Document 66-025) which document is herewith attached to and made 
a part of these minutes. 

Dean Soutter gave an extensive report on the document. 
He covered such matters as the fundamental decision of which 
direction future growth of the Medical School should take and the 
pros and cons of separate and integrated divisions of the medical 
center. 

Following extensive discussion, the sense of committee 
agreement follows: 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1. To recommend to the architect the 
integrated concept in the Medical 
School building program. 

2. That the Medical Center must have 
built-in flexibility for future ex- 
pansion. 

3. That opportunity for expansion of the 
Medical School Hospital must be pro- 
vided. 

4. That Dean Soutter be requested to pre- 
pare a memorandum for the Board of 
Trustees concerning the relationship 
between the Medical School Hospital and 
a Veterans' Administration Hospital. 

Dean Soutter next examined problems relative to Medical 
School faculty salaries and the recruitment of faculty. 

President Lederle explained that he wished to keep the 
Board of Trustees apprised of faculty appointments of two and three 
year duration as outlined in Document 66-028 which is herewith 
attached and made a part of these minutes. No vote was taken, 
but an expression of confidence was expressed by the committee. 

Increasing enrollment and a larger number of applicants 
for the School of Nursing in Amherst were discussed by President 
Lederle and Provost Tippo. Projected enrollment figures for 1966-67 
were seen as rising from 209 this year to 250 or 260 in 1966-67. 

Provost Tippo gave a preliminary progress report on 
academic plans for the Northwest Residential Complex as outlined 
in Document 66-029 which is herewith attached to and made a part 
of these minutes, A brief discussion of the document followed. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:10 p.m. 



2657 



4fr, d %d 



Alan R. Mir 
Secretary pro tern 



2 & 3-Year 

Faculty 

Appointments 



Nursing School 

Projected 

Enrollment 



Northwest 

Residential 

Complex 



2658 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON RECOGNIZED 
STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

October 19, 1965, 1:20 p.m., Student Union, Amherst 

Chairman Thompson presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Thompson, Haigis, Rowland 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Dean Field, Dr. Noff singer, 

Dr. Polite 11a, Mr. Watts, 

Mr. DeGrenier, Mrs. Hudzikiewicz, 

Secretary's Staff Assistant 

Miller and sixteen representatives 

of the student body. (Names and 

offices on attached list) 



Chairman Thompson opened the meeting. He said there 
would be no formal agenda, nor would any votes or motions be made, 
and that the meeting would be informally conducted. 

Communication between the Board of Trustees and the 
Student Body was raised. Student Robert Johnson suggested the 
Board of Trustees consider students' opinions on issues as well as 
those of the administration and faculty. 

Student Senate President Dacey explained the recent con- 
cern expressed by the Student Senate over the Fine Arts Council as 
dealt with in the new Faculty Senate Constitution. Various aspects 
of the Faculty Senate were covered extensively. 

It was agreed that there is a need for further exploration 
of communications problems which are common to a burgeoning uni- 
versity campus. Chairman Thompson said that, in future, the present 
Board Committee on Recognized Student Activities would be in much 
closer liaison with the full Board of Trustees than in the past. 

The role of student publications and communications on 
campus, particularly the student newspaper, The Collegian , was 
discussed. The exchange of views covered such topics as: some 
measure of fiscal autonomy for the Collegian, student compensation 
for services, number of newspaper editions, areas of overlap between 
The Collegian and student radio station WMUA; also, professional 
personnel available to aid students. 

Possibilities of guidance and guidelines for student 
publications was discussed. Mr. Dacey explained that there is a 
Student Senate Ad Hoc Committee investigating the possibility of a 
Communications Commission which would supervise, unify and integrate 
news media on campus, Dacey felt a report would be forthcoming by 
December, 1965, which Chairman Thompson encouraged. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



2659 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Panhellenic Council, Greek- letter Sororities and 
Fraternities and the related problems of zoning, substandard 
housing, campus space for future Greek-letter houses, cultural 
programs and lack of space to accommodate such programs were 
examined. 

Other areas covered: Need for more space in the Student 
Union, preliminary plans for the Continuing Education Center, use 
of nationally- renowned architects in designing campus buildings, 
the trimester, summer sessions, recognizing the strengths and 
weaknesses in the concept of "publish or perish" as applied to 
faculty. 

The meeting closed with mutual expressions on the 
benefits derived from meetings of this nature. Chairman Thompson 
assured the group that there would be more active meetings of the 
committee in the future and that the life and activities of the 
student body at the University is of particular interest to the 
Board of Trustees. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:20 p.m. 



Alan R. Mille£_. ' 
Secretary pro tem 



2660 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston 
Convocation 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
November 9, .1965. 10:00 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: President Lederle; Trustees 
Crowley, Healey, Plimpton 
and Pumphret; Provost Tippo, 
Chancellor Ryan, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney 



the absence of the Chairman, it was moved, seconded 
and unanimously 

VOTED : To appoint Trustee Crowley as the Chair- 
man pro tem of the committee. 

At the invitation of the Chairman oro tem, Chancellor 
R: r an unfolded tentative plans for a convocation signaling the open- 
ing of University of Massachusetts/Boston. Due to the heavy fa " 
schedule and a number of contingencies, Chancellor Ryan ed 
that the President had approved the delay of this convocation until 
next spring. It is hoped that it may he held close enough to 

Her Dec/ to be associated in a "e^eral way with the founding of 
the University. The plan, subject to Trustee approval, would be to 
stage this as a ma,ior University affair. Three sections of the 
convocation were outlined as follows: 

1. A full fledged University convocation in- 
cluding academic procession for members of 
the Board of Trustees and faculty, attended 
by parents, students and staffs of the in- 
stitutions at Amherst and Boston. The 
ceremony would be open to the public. This 
would involve engaging the most distinguished 
possible speaker from the academic world. 

2. A luncheon for a smaller group, but involving 
alumni, some members of the faculty, the 
presidents of other Boston institutions of 
higher learning, etc. for a total of approxi- 
mately 400 individuals. 

3. A post luncheon forum involving four or five 
outstanding individuals to discuss a topic 
of academic importance. The results would 
be published and disseminated to the 
academic community nationally. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Possibilities for the luncheon speaker would include 
Senator Kennedy or President Johnson, (In the event that the 
President signified ability to attend, it might be advisable to 
have him as the main sneaker for the morning event , with its 
larger audience.) 

The estimated cost of the affair would be some where be- 
tween $5,000 and $7,000. 

Tentative plans envision the awarding of honorary de- 
grees but only to relevant nersons. Degrees would be considered 
only for those involved in the program. Eligible for consideration 
would be (a) the main speaker at the a.m. event; also (b) the 
luncheon speaker and (c) the 4 forum participants. 

Trustee Pumphret noted that the President of the United 
States is expected to be in Boston on April 26. 

Chancellor Ryan mentioned the possibility of publishing 
the academic proceedings of the convocation as an edition of 
Daedalus , the journal of the Academy of Arts and Sciences. 

Suggested site for the a.m. program was the War Memorial 
Auditorium. The luncheon might be held either at the Sheraton 
Boston Hotel or at the Statler Hilton. Tours of UM/Boston would 
be held in the afternoon. 

on motion made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To go into Executive Session for the 
purpose of discussing the award of 
honorary degrees to candidates 
nominated for this honor at Commence- 
ment in June, 1966, 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To come out of Executive Session for 
the purpose of carrying on with the 
enda of the meeting. 

In lieu of the award of honorary degrees to certain 
persons nominated, it was suggested that an appropriate citation 
be developed which might be called, for example, the "Trustee 
Alumni Fifty- Year Citation." This would be given at the annual 
alujp.nl luncheon on campus during commencement weekend in June. 
It was agreed that this award, if developed and approved, should 
be presented to our most distinguished alumni as a high honor; 
but not automatically simply because the individuals happen to be 
members of the fifty-year class. 



2661 



2662 



By- Lav/ 
Revisions 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



cretary McCartney reviewed for the committee the back- 
ound of developments up to this noint in terms of revision of the 
By-Laws of the Board of Trustees. 

After hrief discussion, it was suggested that the pro- 
posed By-Laws revisions should he presented for adoption by the 
Board of Trustees at their meeting of January 1°, 1966 with a view 
that the changes would take effect be with the annual meet- 
ing of the Board of Trustees on February 14, 1966. 

Trustee Purnphret suggested that a seminar of the Board 
of Trustees to review a number of overall policy objectives an^ 
problems would be desirable in ~he near future. 

The meeting was adjourned pt 12:25 p.m. 



(?Jb %M 




Robert J. Mcyartney 
Secrete oard of Trustee 




COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY 

AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

November 30, 1965, 12 Noon, Dukes Room "tudent Union, U o 



PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 

Trustees Haigis, Lyons and Plimpton; 
Provost Tippo, Treasurer Johnson, 
c ecretary McCartney, 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Professor William Mellen represent- 
ing the Faculty Senate; Professor 

mond Wyman of the School of 
Education. 



At the invitation of Chairman Troy, Secretary McCartney 
was requested to comment on a memorandum containing background in- 
formation on "The University of Massachusetts and Educational 
Television." 

The Secretary indicated that the interest of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts in Educational Television was long stand- 
ing, growing out of the educational need to offer closed circuit 
instruction in speech, theatre and dramatic arts as well as in 
education; also, from the point of view of exerting cultural in- 
fluence in western Massachusetts (and, potentially, throughout the 
Commonwealth) by relaying programs of an educational and cultural 
nature to the general public. 

There followed a long discussion in which it was brought 
out that educational television could have an important bearing on 
the field of continuing education as the University develops pro- 
grams in this area where the television medium could serve as an 
educational outreach device to enlarge the scope of citizen 
participation. It was pointed out that this would be true regard- 
less of later academic decisions involving whether or not courses 
on the air would be given for credit, 

There was a review of the historical development of the 
University's involvement in educational television leading up to 
the present status: the application to the FCC for a CP (con- 
struction permit) and assignment of a TJHF channel to the University 
at an early date. 

Reference was made to the sum of $50,000 which had been 
released, in 1964 by the State Department of Education to engage 
the services of Jansky and Bailey, an electronic engineering con- 
sulting firm in Washington, D.C. to make a survey of the educa- 
tional television requirements of the entire Commo wealth. Although 



2663 



Educational 

Television 

License 



2664 



COMMITTEE 



UNJVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the final version of the Jansky and Rp:' n e^ report has not yet "been 
formulated, the section -"■elating to western Massachusetts and tc 
the Universit ' possible involvement was quite firm as ea^-' as 

st spring. This indicated that the transmission facility should 
be relocated from the present site of WFCR-FM on Univerc ed 

property at Mt. Lincoln to Mt. Tom where state-owned lai f r c li- 

able , althouph nr access road nti>rt >^ave to be put i 

The Secretary noted that the FCC, i" a reallocation of channel 
assignments last sum^r, tad assigned channel 5? bo tbe western 
Massachusetts area, specificp" 11, in ftjriherst. He said that 
Mr. Hartford Gunn, Genera] Manager, WGBH-TV, (C1 ] 2) Bostor hi 

proposed that the Lowe]" 1 Broadcasting Council t ass the 

nnel *>% license for a period of years and then n k to 

University. After this proposal was referred by WGBH-TV to 
their attc versity + ~ Mr. Austin ^f 

Ely, Bartlett, Pr-^r and Pr^c^or, it developed that the complica- 
ti<- .d delays involved which at first were t] Lnima] _ 

turned out to be excessive The University t ^ r> example, wo-'i'M not 
be in a position to rece: 1 ' Lcense for a period of ten 

yearn or more. In terms °f our rate of growth, and + he 

ious applications of educate televisior tc Universit 

•ams now in tt \ stage, it wr 

at this time with an lication for the lie el ^3 

might be the Univer of Massachusetts. 

C in Troy queried the Secretary e >r. Wyman concerning 

projections for the propose i educat: television facility. 
The Secretar ded that the >f $200,000 was ~r 

capital purposes, and the is wit v representatives of -'-he 

Df Health, Ec 1 Wei are Is dicated 

that $2 n / ^no in Federal matchin ^e be-" n ■"esT- 

and would ' able. Dr. V e usui 

Pacild Dn- 

run to $ r in a 

'orable posit] ;o reduce this f" scause of space av« le 

at present in t] ■ ol of Lon f or ' ie studio. T" ! ■ 

"ited annual operate rsts could range f: 

125 "0° de n the extent of "o: —air" programmi 

i versity and the Fo^.r Colleges. It was indi- 
?d that ■ ^-originated at the outset would 

rial. WGBH-TV is most anxious to have its programming schedule 
carried in wester" sachusetts by Channel 58 , and would be will- 

ing to cooperate. Membership in the EEN (Eastern Educational Net- 
work) v 7 come to $7,500 a year, and this woul.-*' 1 ope "t e door t 
a large number of additional taped educational programs which are 
in current distribution along the eastern seaboard. 

Mrther discus ' nd nj uon made and seconded, 

it we 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend tc Boa-H o^ Trustees 
that the University proceed to a] 
to the Federal Communicate Commission 
t of the license for educa- 
tional television Chi :> to 'the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the electronic engineering consulting firm 
of Jansky and B iley of Washington, D.C. 
he engaged to assist with the processd 
of the license application with respect to 
technical matters; also that the firm Df 
Ely, Bartlett, Brown pnd Proctor in 
cooperation with attorney Richard Perry 
of Washir [ton, D.C. he engaged to assist 
in this license application with respect 
to legal ratters. 

Trustee Plimpton commented on the desirahility of 
tablishing a 2500 watt transmitter for link-up and exchange of 
educational communication between the Four Colleges at an ear 1 ^ 
date. 

The Secretary was instructed to obtain from Mr. Joseph 
nn of the Bureau of Building Construction a co-nj of the pre- 
liminary draft of the Commonwealth survey re educational television 
made by Jansky and Bailey. 

After brief discussion and "-non motion made and 
secorded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the approval of the list of Sabbatical 
Leave Applications for 1966-67 as de- 
tailed in Document 66-032, which docu- 
ment will now be circulated to all 
members of the Board. 

Provost Tippo brought up for discussion the proposed 
salary levels for a number of forthcoming appointments. He indi- 
cated that Fordham University now plans to pay their professors an 
average of $22,500 per annum. The Stony Brook branch of New York 
State University has established several nrofessorshins in the 
thirty to forty thousand dollar range. These are examnles of the 
kind of competition for top-level instructional talent that is be- 
ginning to emerge on the national market. The Provost indicated 
that the attraction of living in the Town of Amherst as well as 
the forthcoming establishment of Hampshire College as a fifth member 
of the Four College group has proved to be an inducement to some 
interested applicants for University positions. 



2665 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 



Salary 
Levels 



Ad Hoc Medical 

School 

Committee 

COMMITTEE 



Trustee Repre- 
sentation on 
Board of 
Higher Educa- 
tion 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Loderle commented, briefly on the problem of how 
the Board irught relate to the new Medical School. He observer! that 
it would be important in any solution to this problem to have all 
Timbers of the medical nrofession on the Bop-v bring their talents 
to bear in discussions of policy problems relating to the Medical 

LOOl. 

Provost Tippo ^ointed out that the Trustee representative 
on the new Board of Higher Education should be a non alumnus, if tie 
Governor happens to select any other alumnus of t'-ie University to 
membersHn of the Board at large. 

The meeting was adjourned at °: 




Robert J. ] 
Secretary, Bo 



1 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
December 6, 1965, 12 Noon, Dukes Room, Student Union, U of M 



PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown and Gordon; Provost 
Tippo, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Director of Physical Plant Hugill, 
Planning Officer Littlefield. 



At the invitation of the Chairman, Treasurer Johnson 
gave the committee a brief summary of the status of the capital 
outlay budget now before the Legislature. He indicated that, of 
the budget of $27,452,000 that went to the Governor, a recommenda- 
tion went from the Governor to the Legislature that was just under 
$20,000,000; the House then cut this budget back slightly, and the 
Senate cut it down to $9,257,000. This budget presumably will be 
approved. The Senate version contains $1,697,000 for the addition 
to Machmer Hall, which is in addition to the approximately 
$1,000,000 appropriation we already have in hand. The Treasurer 
indicated that sufficient funds were now available to proceed with 
the construction of the Machmer Tower as detailed in the rendering 
which was displayed for the committee. Final plans are expected 
to be completed during the week of December 13. The building has 
accommodations for more than 200 faculty offices which should re- 
lieve considerably the critical office shortage now present at the 
University. 

On the Graduate Research Center which was the other major 
project for appropriation, the Governor had recommended $12,080,000 
plus what might be available from Federal sources; this was raised 
by the House to $15,260,000. The thought here was that the build- 
ing could be constructed all at once at a saving to the Common- 
wealth in excess of $1,000,000. The Senate next authorized a total 
project of $20,780,000, but they cut back the present appropriation 
to $6,060,000 which cannot be applied to any particular segment 
of the project. The Senate also indicated that the University 
would be expected to get $5,520,000 Federal funds toward this 
project, of which $3,117,364 is on hand from Federal sources. It 
may now be possible, under a rewording arrangement of the Senate 
legislation, to purchase the remainder of the computer equipment for 
the complex from an anount of $1,500,000 which also includes site 
preparation and working drawings. 



2667 



on 



Report 
Current Capital 
Outlay Budget 
Request 



Addition to 
Machmer Hall 



Graduate 
Research 
Center 



2668 



COMMITTEE 



Continuing 

Education 

Center 



Medical 
School 



Fine Arts 
Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Of $1,000,000 requested, $500,000 has been appropriated 
for roadways; of $1,500,000 requested, $1,000,000 was appropriated 
for utilities. The number one priority capital outlay project of 
the administration, confirmed by the Board of Trustees, namely, 
planning money for the Library in the amount of $375,000, was not 
appropriated. 

The Treasurer noted that these cut backs pose a serious 
problem, for example, in the work of architect Stone who was 
authorized to produce a feasibility study for the Library to the 
extent of $4-0,000. These funds are now exhausted. The feasibility 
study for the Continuing Education Center has been completed by 
Marcel Breuer but no appropriation was made for plans. Another 
crucial problem is raised here, however, because the Continuing 
Education project envisaged also an increase at the first two floor 
levels in the capacity of the Student Union. No relief is now in 
sight for a period of three to four years. Discussion followed on 
the serious problems posed to the University by the turning aside 
by the Legislature of the University's number one project for the 
capital outlay program for 1966. The Treasurer indicated that the 
only solution now in view might be for the Governor to submit 
another capital outlay budget to be funded from current revenues. 

Discussion followed on the fact that the architects pro- 
posed by the Board of Trustees for the Medical School are being de- 
layed in appointment by the Office of the Deputy Commissioner on 
Administration and Finance. This action has occurred despite the 
direction given by the Governor to appoint the firm of Architects 
Collaborative in association with Ellerbe to design the Medical 
School and associated hospital facilities. 

The Provost commented on the inhibiting effect on faculty 
recruitment that is becoming evident as a result of the fact that 
our budget has not passed to date, and that certain key priority 
projects of the University such as the Library plans are being 
turned down by the Legislature. The Treasurer noted that pre- 
liminary plans for the Fine Arts Building had been completed and 
approved. He stated that it was his understanding that Saarinen 
Associates had a design contract for complete working drawings and 
specifications. The matter was then referred to the Bureau of 
Building Construction for their concurrence, so that work could pro- 
ceed. The Treasurer then read a letter received from Mr. Chase of 
the Bureau of Building Construction which projected a revised cost 
estimate figure of $8,500,000. The substance of the letter was that 
the University must now submit a new project request in view of the 
revised cost estimates. The Bureau indicated that they could not 
now proceed to authorize the designer to proceed with working de- 
signs and specifications because only $260,000 had been appropriated 
for this purpose. The new budget breakdown indicates that the sum 
of $593,000 would be required for such projections. This, the 
Treasurer stated, has the effect of stopping the Fine Arts Building 
project dead in its tracks. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

At the invitation of the Chairman, the President re- 
ported that the final legislation authorizing lease or purchase of 
the UM/Boston building (Chapter 388 of the Acts of 1965) directed 
that a plan be submitted for purchase of the building by February 
1966. Also, by December 15, 1965, the University must file with 
the Federal Facilities people for the sum of $750,000. 



it was 



After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees, 
in accordance with Chapter 3#& of the 
Acts of 1965, the purchase of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts/Boston build- 
ing, and the filing of an application 
to the Federal Government for funds in 
the amount of $750,000 under the Higher 
Education Facilities Act for this pur- 
pose, and for further renovation of the 
structure. 

The capital outlay budget request for 1967 in an amount 
of $36,604,500 State funds for the Amherst campus was distributed 
to members of the committee. The Treasurer noted that no land 
acquisition money is included in this budget. The Provost 
observed that the budget had been carefully screened at three 
separate meetings of the Deans' Council and confirmed by the 
Master Planning Committee in terms of finalizing priorities. 
There followed discussion on the list of priorities and the 
Treasurer noted that the substantial size of present capital outlay 
requests represented a backlogging and snowballing of projects 
carried over from previous budget requests for which appropriations 
had not been made by the Legislature, The planning officer stated 
that approximately $110,000,000 to $120,000,000 in total capital 
outlay requests for education were currently before the Legislature 
as against the University's request for about $28,000,000 in the 
present budget. There was discussion on steps which the University 
might take to bring home the importance of legislative follow- 
through on these requests if the University is expected to carry 
out its mission for the people of the Commonwealth. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

the approval of the capital outlay bud- 
get request for fiscal year 1967 (Docu- 
ment 66-04]), which document will now 
be forwarded to the Board of Trustees. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
a budget request of $300,000 for land 
acquisition for the Amherst campus in 
accordance with the Master Plan. 



2669 



UM/Boston 
HEF Grant 
Application 
to Purchase 
and Renovate 



Capital Outlay 
Budget Request- 
Fiscal Year 
1967 



2670 



COMMITTEE 



Traffic 
Signs 



Towing 
Contract 



Approval of 

Completed 

Projects 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

With the expansion of the campus, new traffic signs are 
required at certain locations. The Treasurer presented a map de- 
tailing their location. It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the location of traffic signs as 
presented to the meeting be approved. 

The President commented on the problem of arranging for 
better egress from the University Stadium after football games. 
Numerous complaints have been received that delays of up to 55 
minutes duration have been experienced by some fans. The necessity 
of working cooperatively with the Town of Amherst to insure that 
this situation is improved was stressed. 

Additionally, after motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the Department of Public Works be 
requested to construct a grade 
separated interchange to assist in 
traffic movement at the juncture of 
Amity Street (Rocky Hill Road) and 
Route 116. 

The Treasurer commented that the Department of Public 
Works wishes the University to assume maintenance on three traffic 
lights now located on campus property at North Pleasant Street. 

The Treasurer reported that after competitive bidding for 
a new towing contract, the successful bidder will receive towing 
charges of $7.00, compared with $6.00 under the previous contract. 

After brief discussion and on recommendation of the 
Treasurer, it was moved, seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

the approval of the following completed 
projects: 

U-637 Contract 10 - Addition to steam and 
electric systems - final plans 

U-637 Contract 9 - Study of addition to 
power plant 

U-64-5 Central storage building - approval 
of final plans 

U-65-1 Contract 2 - Renovation of Flint 

Laboratory - approval of preliminary 
plans 

U-63-3 Coal handling facility - final 
acceptance 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

UM64-I Contract 1 - Boulevard parking - 
final acceptance 

After brief discussion on the requirement of the Uni- 
versity for further lands looking tov/ard expansion in the future, 
and with Committee Chairman Haigis abstaining because of personal 
acquaintance with the property owner involved, it was moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the Winkler property on the north- 
east edge of the campus be taken by 
eminent domain, exempting approximately 
two acres of land at the request of 
Mr. Winkler to use for the construction 
of a personal domicile, and providing 
for a 60-foot land corridor at the north 
boundary. 

The Treasurer outlined a request received by the Amherst 
Industrial Committee to have the University release a strip of 
land in the northwest quandrant of the campus for the purpose of 
setting up a research and light industrial park. After brief 
discussion, it was decided that this request could not be honored 
at a time when the University was experiencing necessity of acquiring 
land elsewhere. It was pointed out that the industrial complex 
on Route 128, much of which relates to research activities at MIT, 
is not close to the MIT campus, but nevertheless is able to function 
effectively. 



The Treasurer referred to a proposal by Mr. Mervin Rubin, 
a graduate of the University, expressing interest in constructing 
a graduate student housing development adjacent to the proposed 
Northwest Dormitory Complex. This would consist of one-bedroom 
units at $80 a month, two-bedroom units at $90 a month and three- 
bedroom units at $100 a month including all utilities. These 
rates are lower than the going rates in the community. Mr. Rubin 
was asked to come back with a complete outline indicating the size 
and arrangements of rooms within these apartments and the level of 
construction that would go into the project. After brief 
discussion, it was agreed that the University should not encourage 
Mr. Rubin to continue with plans for this project. 

Treasurer Johnson noted that, due to expansion and 
grov/th, the University is now encroaching upon the area occupied 
by the State Nursery in the northwest quadrant of the campus. It 
was agreed that the State Nursery should be advised that the Uni- 
versity will now require this land and that the State Nursery 
should look toward relocation within five years. 



2671 



Eminent 
Domain 
Proceedings 
re Winkler 
Property 



Request of 
Amherst In- 
dustrial 
Committee 
for Land 



Rubin 
Proposal 



Relocation 
of State 
Nursery 



2672 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was also agreed that the University dump should be 
moved to the east side of the campus on the far edge of the 
Tillson Farm - on the east side of the railroad tracks. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:4-0 p.m. 




Robert J. ("McCartney 
Secretary, j3oard of Trusteed 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY 

AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

January 11, 1966, 12 Noon, Dukes Room, Student Union, U of M 



PRESENT ! Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Haigis, Lyons, Plimpton; 
Provost Tippo; Secretary's Staff 
Assistant Miller. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Professor Me lien, Chairman of the 
Faculty Senate Committee on 
Academic Matters; Professor 
Bezanson, Head of the Department 
of Music; Professor Randall, Head 
of the Department of Recreation; 
Dr. Gentile, Assistant Dean, 
Graduate School; Dr. Bischoff, 
Assistant Dean, School of Physical 
Education; Dr. Venman, Assistant 
to the Provost. 



The Chairman called the meeting to order. Provost Tippo, 
at the invitation of the Chairman, presented the Graduate School 
proposal, "Standards and Procedures for Doctoral Programs of the 
University of Massachusetts" as detailed in Item 1 of Document 
66-033, which document is attached to and made a part of these 
minutes. Comment was solicited. Discussion centered on various 
aspects of the proposal dealing with the cooperative doctoral pro- 
gram as referred to in the Willis Report. Dr. Gentile pointed out 
that eventual approval will be required by the Board of Higher 
Education, and also summarized the doctoral program at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, entrance requirements, and emphasized 
that applications to the Graduate School have doubled over last 
year. 

It was stressed that the proposal presented for 
discussion would come up for action at a later date; that all 
cooperating institutions will be afforded the opportunity to 
comment if the document is basically acceptable to the Board of 
Trustees; and that the document is intended to provide guidelines 
to maintain standards of the doctoral degree which would be an aid 
rather than a hindrance to state colleges cooperating in the pro- 
gram. The discussion concluded without any vote being taken. 

Dr. Bezanson was introduced. Discussion centered on the 
Master of Music degree, how it would benefit the Commonwealth and 
teachers of music, and the need for its implementation. Other 
areas covered were the growth and future plans for the Department 
of Music, the need for more adequate facilities, and the raising 
of the caliber of entering students through the use of interviews 
and auditions. 



2673 



Cooperative 

Doctoral 

Programs 



Master of 
Music Degree 



:674 



COMMITTEE 



Recreation 
Curriculum 
and Course 
Revisions 



New Course; 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Following further discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they approve the Proposal for a 
Master of Music Degree as detailed in 
Item 2 of Document 66-033 which docu- 
ment is herewith attached to and made 
a part of these minutes. 

Assistant Dean Bischoff recommended the proposed revision 
of the curriculum and course offerings in the Department of 
Recreation. Dr. Randall explained the curriculum. Discussion 
covered the job and salary potential for graduates, course load and 
revisions, the discipline of recreation, history of the department, 
and personnel in recreation work. Dr. Mellen said the Faculty 
Senate Academic Affairs Committee discussed the program thoroughly 
and approved the proposal as a distinct improvement over the present 
program. It was suggested that the Provost investigate ways of 
strengthening the curriculum in the Department of Recreation. 

After further discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they approve the Department of 
Recreation's proposal for revision of 
curriculum and course offerings as de- 
tailed in Item 3 of Document 66-033 
which document is herewith attached to 
and made part of these minutes. 

Provost Tippo presented the new courses appearing as 
Items 4, 5 and 6 in Document 66-033, and recommended approval. 
After brief discussion, and upon motion made and seconded, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they approve the new courses as 
outlined in Items 4, 5 and 6, Document 
66-033, which document is herewith 
attached to and made part of these 
minutes. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Provost Tippo discussed 
the qualifications of the nominee for the position of Head of the 
German/Russian Department and Professor of German. After further 
discussion and upon motion made and seconded, it was unanimously 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

the appointment of Dr. Wolfgang Paulsen 
to the post of Professor of German with 
tenure and Head of the German/Russian 
Department at the University of Massa- 
chusetts . 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:15 p.m. 




Alan R. fcle*- 
Secretary pro tern 



1 



2675 



Head of 

Ge rman/Rus s i an 

Department 



2676 



COMMITTEE 



Architects for 
University of 
Massachusetts 
Medical School 



Additional 

Honorary 

Degree 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
January 14-, 1966, 12:30 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman pro tern Healey, Presi- 
dent Lederle; Trustees Crowley 
and Pumphret; Provost Tippo, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Mr. Austin Broadhurst of the 

firm of Ely, Bartlett, Brown 

and Proctor. 

The meeting was called to order by Chairman pro tem 



Healey, 



President Lederle commented on the fact that the Uni- 
versity's first priority selection of cooperating firms of archi- 
tects for the Medical School had been set aside by the Commissioner 
of Administration and Finance. Discussion followed on the careful 
investigation and research which preceded recommendation of the 
firms of Architects Collaborative with Ellerbe as the first choice 
of the Trustees, and the importance of obtaining the best possible 
talent in the nation to accomplish this important task. The Office 
of the Commissioner of Administration and Finance had recommended 
the firms of Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty in collaboration with 
Ritchie Associates, with Anthony J. J. Rourke, M.D. as medical 
consultant . 

After extended discussion, it was agreed that all Trustees 
who were available to attend a meeting in the Office of the Com- 
missioner on Administration and Finance on Tuesday, January 18, 
should be invited. It was the opinion of the Chairman pro tem that 
all of the problems attendant upon establishing a first-class 
Medical School should be laid before the Commissioner in a straight 
forward manner. The Dean of the Medical School will be invited to 
comment. 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To go into Executive Session for the 
purpose of considering an additional 
candidate for an honorary degree at the 
commencement exercises next June. 

After appropriate discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : That the committee come out of Executive 
Session for the purpose of continuing 
with the business of the agenda. 



COMMITTEE 



I 



2677 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



There followed extensive discussion 
working draft of proposed revisions in the By- 
Trustees. In presenting the draft, Secretary 
the revisions had been contemplated for quite 
the present working draft was the end product 
administrative discussion, and was based on a 
ing drafts which were now superseded. 



and review of a 
•Laws of the Board of 
McCartney noted that 
some time, and that 
of many hours of 
series of prior work- 



Revision of 
By-Laws of 
the Board of 
Trustees 



After considering the provisions of the latest working 
draft point by point, the document was referred to Mr. Austin 
Broadhurst of the firm of Ely, Bartlett, Brown and Proctor so that 
it might be conformed to existing statutes of the Commonwealth in 
every respect, and for the purpose of rewriting in legally appro- 
priate form for presentation to the full Board of Trustees. 
Attorney Broadhurst indicated that he would have the redraft 
available on Friday, January 21, 1966. The Secretary was in- 
structed to mail copies of the redraft to the members of the Board 
of Trustees not later than Saturday, January 22. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:00 p.m. 




Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



:678 



COMMITTEE 



Merit 

Salary 

Increments 



List of 
Promotions 



Tenure 
List 



License 
Transfer: 

WFCR-FM 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY 

AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

January 18, 1966, 10:00 a.m., President's Office, South College 

PRESEN T: Chairman Troy, President Lederle; Trustees 
Crowley and Lyons; Provost Tippo, Secretary 
McCartney. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Personnel Director John L. DeNyse. 



Chairman Troy called the meeting to order at 10:15 a.m. 
The committee spent the entire day reviewing in great detail the 
annual merit salary increments for the professional staff. The 
Trustees ascertained that their policy of review by department and 
college level personnel committees had been followed throughout. 

Steps were taken by the committee to make certain that 
the agricultural program did not get out of line with the scope of 
existing program commitments, and that as much Federal money as 
possible was*' being allocated to the salary schedules in the agri- 
cultural area. 

On the asis of the detailed discussion which consumed 
the major portion of the meeting, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED; To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that they confirm and approve the salaries 
for professional staff included in the 
Operating Budget of the University for 1966. 

It was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that they confirm and approve the list of 
faculty promotions detailed in Document 66-039. 

It was also 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that they confirm and approve the list of 
persons recommended for tenure as detailed 
in Document 66-040. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Secretary McCartney 
introduced a letter received from Mr. Horace W. Hewlett, President 
of the Western Massachusetts Broadcasting Council indicating that 
the license for the Four College Radio Station, WFCR-EM must soon 
be relinguished by V/GBH in Boston, the present holder. The letter 
advanced reasons why it would be feasible for the University of 
Massachusetts to assume the license. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNiVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Secretary McCartney pointed out that the University 
already has a moderate commitment to this station in personnel; 
also, the broadcasting facility is housed in a University-owned 
building on University property at Mt. Lincoln. Since the Uni- 
versity is already committed to apply for an educational television 
license, with a facility proposed to be located on Mt. Tom, it has 
been suggested from many soucres that the future outlook might be 
one of combining the WFCR-FM transmitter with the television 
facility atop Mt. Tom. The Western Massachusetts Broadcasting 
Council would assign to the University all of the existing fixed 
transmitter equipment which it presently owns. 

After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 
it was unanimously 

VOTED; To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the University of Massachusetts, 
with the consent and approval of the 
Western Massachusetts Broadcasting 
Council, Inc. of Boston, apply to the 
Federal Communications Commission for 
a transfer of license for radio station 
WFCR-FM from the present holder, WGBH, 
Boston, said license to be assigned to 
the University of Massachusetts. 



2679 



There followed brief discussion on the proposed 
curriculum for the Department of Recreation and Wildlife Management. 
It was decided to lay this matter on the table for report to the 
full Board of Trustees at the February meeting. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:25 p.m. 





Recreation 
Program 



Robert "j. McCartney 
Secretary, ; Board of Trustee 



2680 



COMMITTEE 



Evaluation 
of Business 
Outlook 



Codding 
Estate 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

January 21, 1966, 10:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 

Trustees Emerson, Gordon and Pumphret; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Assistant Business Manager Sidney 

Myers; Mr. Ted Ladd of Standish, 

Ay er & McKay, Inc., Investment 

Counsellors . 

The meeting was called to order at 11:20 a.m. At the 
invitation of the Chairman, Treasurer Johnson introduced Mr. Ted 
Ladd of Standish, Ayer & McKay, Inc. Investment Counsellors. 

Mr. Ladd indicated that the state of the economy at this 
time appears very good. In 1965 the gross national product was 
675 billion dollars, up 70$. For 1966, it is predicted to rise to 
720 billion dollars. There are no real signs of a recession. 
There is a possibility that imbalances may develop later on, however 
Among the indicators: higher interest rates, labor shortages, 
excessive capital expenditures. The economy undoubtedly is verging 
on significant inflation, and this will continue throughout 1966 — 
particularly as long as the Vietnam crisis remains an economic 
stimulant . 

Mr. Ladd continued that, in 1965, bond prices v/ere weak. 
The attitude of Standish, Ayer & McKay, Inc. remains essentially 
the same as that expressed on the occasion of his last report. 
Interest rates remain high on long-term treasury bonds, the highest 
yield, in fact, since 1921. The firm has no immediate idea of when 
the market may bottom out. An odd situation has developed on the 
bond market, in that there is little yield differential at the 
present time between treasuries and corporates. There is a real 
prospect of heavier corporate term financing. 

On common stocks, the picture remained strong throughout 
1965. There was a 11$ rise in Dow Jones Industrials. The present 
situation reflects the existence of two common stock markets: a 
trusteed market and a speculator's market. There is a question, of 
course, whether an increase in corporate taxes might depreciate 
carport e earnings gains. His firm has preferred to stay clear of 
cyclical stocks. On behalf of Standish, Ayer & McKay, Inc., Mr. 
Ladd had no suggestions at the present time for a change in the 
University's portfolio. 

With respect to the Codding Estate, Mr. Ladd had suggested 
previous changes and he reported that these were now implemented 
and that they had dovetailed well into the overall portfolio. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The University's general stock portfolio remains at about 
r/o. No change is proposed. A recommendation might be made later 
that the University move from treasuries to corporates next year. 



55f 



Mr. Johnson reported that approximately $4,000 in 
uninvested cash principal was on hand at the moment. Based on 
advice of investment counsel, it was agreed without vote that the 
most sound procedure would be to withhold this sum from investment 
at this time. 

Treasurer Johnson reported on the status of new endowment 
funds. He reminded the committee that the Ruth J. Totman Service 
Fund had been established in May 1964 as a temporary trust fund to 
record receipts of gifts and donations to the RUTH J. TOTMAN 
MEMORAILD FUND. After a banquet given in honor of Miss Totman, the 
balance of $949.17 remains. 

Mr. Johnson stated that a faculty committee administering 
the Service Fund has now requested that it be established as an 
Endowment Fund with the income from the fund made available to 
support the Women's Physical Education program. 

After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 
it was unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Trustees accept the RUTH J. TOTMAN 
MEMORIAL FUND in the amount of $949.17 and 
establish it as an Endowment Fund of the 
University with the income therefrom to be 
made available, on an annual basis, and to 
be disbursed with the approval of the De- 
partment Head of Women's Physical Education 
for the advancement of the Women's Physical 
Education program and/or the benefit of 
women majoring in Physical Education. 

In the event that the income from said fund is not 
disbursed during the current fiscal year, it may be returned to 
principal at the discretion of the Department Head of Women's 
Physical Education. 

Treasurer Johnson reminded the committee that it had 
voted to accept a gift of two shares of International Business 
Machines Corporation Capital Stock valued at $946.00, said vote 
talcing place at the meeting of July 7, 1965. This sum was to 
establish the OSWALD BEHREND AWARD FUND. Pursuant to the terms of 
the gift, the Department of Athletics was to purchase a permanent 
trophy at a cost not to exceed $250.00, with the balance going to 
establish an endowment fund. 

After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 
it was unanimously 



2681 



New 

Endowment 

Funds 



Ruth J. 
Totman 
Memorial Fund 



Oswald 
Behrend 
Award Fund 



2682 



COMMITTEE 



Addison H. 
Clarke 
Memorial 
Loan Fund 



Proposed 

Student 

Activities 

Fee - 

Summer 

Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED: To approve the sale of two shares of 
International Business Machines 
Corporation Capital Stock with the pro- 
ceeds from said sale to be made available 
for the purchase of a permanent trophy at 
a cost not to exceed $250.00 and to 
establish the OSWALD BEHREND AWARD FUND 
pursuant to the terms of the gift. 

The Treasurer also reminded the Board that at its meeting 
on July 7, 1965, it established the ADDISON H. CLARKE MEMORIAL LOAN 
FUND as an Endowment Fund. He further stated that a review of the 
Last Will and Testament of Katherine Allen Clarke indicates that 
loans are to be made from both principal and income to industrious 
and deserving students of the University. It was further indicated, 
that in the investment and administration of the fund, wide 
discretion with broad and comprehensive powers is expressly granted 
to the Board of Trustees. 

After brief review and discussion and upon motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of the transfer of the principal 
and earned interest in the Addison H. 
Clarke Memorial Loan Fund in the Endowment 
Funds section to the Trust Fund Loans 
section and 

To further recommend that loans may be 
awarded in an amount not to exceed one- 
half of the estimated normal student 
budget required to attend the University 
in any academic year in which the loan 
is made and said loan will bear interest 
at the rate of 3% to graduation and % 
thereafter or as may be adjusted by the 
Trustees in future years in keeping with 
other loan programs. 

Treasurer Johnson stated that, upon receipt of written 
requests from the Dean of Students and the Director of the Summer 
Session, and after a summer of experimentation with an increased 
program, including a new fine arts festival, a rearrangement of 
fees is requested for the Summer Program. 

The Summer Recreation Fee is presently $1.00 per session, 
and the income was used to support some of the costs of the in- 
creased Summer Program. 

The Student Union Fee is presently $4.00 per six weeks 
summer session and $1.00 per week for special courses of less than 
one semester. 



UMIIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



After "brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 



it was 



V OTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the Summer Recreation Fee be charged 
to STUDENT ACTIVITIES FEE - SUMMER PROGRAM 
and that the fee be approved at $1.00 per week, 

And to further recommend the approval of 
the Student Union Fee for the six weeks 
session to conform with the present $1.00 
a week fee for special courses of less 
than one semester. 



Treasurer Johnson called upon Assistant Business Manager 
Sidney Myers to present a summary of the intent and purpose of the 
proposed Personnel Protection Liability Insurance Policy. 

Mr. Myers stated that the proposed coverage protects 
against personal injury suits against trustees, employees end 
agents of the University while driving motor vehicles registered in 
the name of the University when said vehicles are being used, 
operated or driven in the usual course of or within the scope of 
the business of the University. Coverage extends also to claims by 
occupants of any such vehicles. Coverage further extends to 
trustees, employees and agents of the University while driving their 
own motor vehicles in the usual course of or within the scope of 
University business. Mr. Myers added that property damage coverage 
was another feature of the proposed policy. Coverage would be 
"excess coverage" where applicable. Finally, Mr. Myers pointed 
out that the Walter A. Howell Agency, Northampton, was the low 
bidder, offering a package of $500,000/$l,000,000 personal injury 
and $25,000 property damage, at a net, total premium of $7,143.99. 

Trustee Pumphret observed that the business office was to 
be congratulated on obtaining a very good quotation for this policy. 
Chairman Healey stressed the necessity for establishing a firm set 
of internal controls concerning circumstances under which coverage 
extended by the proposed policy would apply. It was indicated that 



the University was 
Interest . 



funded 



to handle the Dolicy on Trust Fund 



seconded 



After further discussion and upon motion made and 
it ?/as unanimously 



VOTED: To recommend 



to 



the Board of Trustees 



that they accept the low bid of $7,14-8.99 
anda?ard the contract for this policy from 
the budgeted item under Trust Fund Interest 
to Lumbermens Mutual Casualty Company 
(division of Kemper Insurance of Chicago, 
Illinois), agent: Walter A. Howell, 
Northampton for a Personnel Protection 
Liability Insurance Policy in accordance 
with specifications on file in the Office 
of the Treasurer. 



2683 



Personnel 
Protection 
Liability 
Insurance 

Policy 



;684 



COMMITTEE 



Treasurer's 
Comments on 
Auditor * s 
Report 



Other 
Business 



Disability 

Income 

Insurance 



Variable 
Interest 
Time 

Accounts 



UNJVERS1TY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was further 

VOTED : To bind said insurance contract, 
effective January 21, 1966, on an 
administrative basis, subject to 
confirmation and approval of the 
Board of Trustees at its meeting of 
January 31, 1966, such approval and 
confirmation to include the binder 
period and implementation of the 
contract effective February 1, 1966. 

The committee reviewed the Auditor's Report and Treasurer 
Johnson's response thereto. 

The Trustees complimented Treasurer Johnson on his conduct 
of the financial affairs of the University as reflected in the 
latest report of the State Auditor. It was noted that certain 
clarifications would be desirable in the area of transfers of funds 
within the maintenance appropriation. 

The Treasurer concluded with brief reference to two 
further items as follows: 

a. Disability Income Insurance 

The Treasurer reported that considerable 
interest had been expressed by the 
faculty in some form of disability in- 
come insurance. It was noted that 
participation in this program would be 
voluntary and that there would be no 
cost to the University. Without vote, 
the Trustees agreed that the establish- 
ment of such a program would be desirable. 

b. Variable Interest Time Accounts 

Treasurer Johnson stated that on the 
basis of $25,000 minimum deposit, the 
First National Bank of Boston was 
offering variable interest time accounts 
at 4 3/S/o interest, with 30 days prior 
written notice. He reported that he is 
transferring $500,000 now drawing A% 
interest in the First National Bank of 
Boston to this new account. 

He noted that $325,000 was now on a 
certificate of deposit at 4^ at the 
State Street Bank and Trust Company; 
also that $500,000 was on a certificate 
of deposit at the Shawmut Bank of 
Boston at 4-s%» 



I 



;OMMITTEE 



UNFVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Treasurer passed out Summary of Gifts and Grants 
through November and the attached comments on the Auditors Report. 

The meeting Yfas adjourned at 12:40 p.m. 




Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



2685 



2686 



COMMITTEE 



By-Laws 
Review 



UN1VERSSTY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
January 21, 1966, 1:4-5 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT ; President Lederle; Trustees Healey 
and Pumphret; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION ; Mr. Austin Broadhurst of the firm 

of Ely, Bartlett, Brown and Proctor 



The meeting was convened at 1:45 p.m. 

In the absence of the Chairman, it was moved, seconded 
and unanimously 

VOTED : To name Trustee Healey as Chairman pro 
tern of the meeting. 

Mr. Austin Broadhurst of the firm of Ely, Bartlett, Brown 
and Proctor presented a working draft of the proposed revisions in 
By-Laws of the Board of Trustees and after extensive reviev/, it was 
moved, seconded and unanimously 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the working draft of proposed re- 
visions of the By-Laws of the Board of 
Trustees (Document 66-043 ) be approved. 

The Secretary was instructed to send copies of the work- 
ing draft to the Board of Trustees as soon as possible. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:25 p.m. 




Robert jf, McCartney 
Secretary 7 , Board of Truste 




COMMITTEE 



IVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMVCETTEE ON FACULTY 
AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

February 15, 1966, 12:00 Noon, Dukes Room, Student Union 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy; President Lederle; 
Trustee Lyons; Provost Tippo; 
Treasurer Johnson; Secretary's 
Staff Assistant Miller. 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Professors Ms lien, Leed, Ellert, 
Harris and Rollason; Assistant 
to the Provost Venman. 



The Chairman called the meeting to order. At the invita- 
tion of the Chairman, Provost Tippo presented amendments to 
sabbatical leave policy as recommended by the Faculty Affairs 
Committee of the Faculty Senate. Professor Leed was introduced. 
He outlined the work of the Faculty Affairs Committee on Sabbatical 
Leave Policy. During the discussion, it was suggested that 
"affiliation" in paragraph (d) be changed to "full-time service"; 
that the policies on sabbatical leave should be flexible and thus 
permit the exercise of some discretion by the administration; that 
vacation time should be taken into account by amending paragraph 
(e) to read "11 months and 5j months" rather than "12 months and 
6 months" respectively. It was noted that the compulsory retire- 
ment age of 70 years is the standard intended and that sabbatical 
leaves are a privilege, not a right. Faculty should be encouraged 
to take sabbatical leaves, it was stressed. 

Following further discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

they approve the Faculty Senate's recommenda- 
tions on sabbatical leave policy, with amend- 
ments, as outlined in Document 66-049 which 
document is herewith attached to and made a 
part of these minutes. 

Provost Tippo gave a briefing on a Report on Faculty- 
Trustee Relations, as detailed in Document 66-050 which document . 
is herewith attached to and made a part of these minutes. After 
discussion, it was the consensus that the report be submitted to 
the Board of Trustees for its information. No vote was taken. 

Amendments to the Freiburg Proposal were read by Provost 
Tippo, before introducing Professors Rollason, Harris and Ellert. 
Professor Rollason gave the background on the Freiburg Proposal. 
He stated that it will differ from Junior Year Abroad programs in 
that it will be more selective, insist on high academic standing 



2687 



Sabbatical 

Leave 

Policy 



Faculty- 
Trustee 
Relationships 



Freiburg 
Proposal 



2688 



COMMITTEE 



Commonwealth 
Professorships 



Northwest 

Residential 

College 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



and command of the German language, and will be open to undergraduate 
and graduate students. He explained the rationale of including under 
graduates during the initial period of experimentation of the pro- 
gram. 

Professors Harris and Ellert reviewed the Freiburg 
Amerika Haus cooperation and programming, possible use of Freiburg 
University dormitory space by some UMass students and the housing 
of other participants with German families. Supplementary financial 
assistance will be sought from the Associate Alumni, and the German 
Consulate in Boston has been queried about scholarships, possibly 
donated by German industrial concerns. It was generally agreed 
that once the program is established, the University of Massachusetts 
would be in a better position to seek foundation support. 

President Lederle suggested a quota system be established 
whereby UMass students are given first consideration in the program; 
and that outside funding be sought. 

It was agreed that out-of-state tuition should be charged 
both University of Massachusetts students and those from other in- 
stitutions where applicable and that in addition there be a special 
course charge for students coming from other institutions. 

Chairman Troy emphasized that the Freiburg Proposal was a 
potentially valuable program and should help raise the tone of the 
University of Massachusetts. 

After further consideration and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was i manimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustee 

that they approve the Freiburg Proposal, 
with amendments, as outlined in Docu- 
ment 66-051 which document is herewith 
attached to and made a part of these 
minutes. 

Following discussion of the Report on Commonwealth Pro- 
fessorships as outlined in Document 66-052, which document is here- 
with attached to and made a part of these minutes, the committee 
accepted the report and expressed reaffirmation of "support and con- 
tinuation of the Commonwealth Professorships. 

Provost Tippo reported that a sense of urgency on plans 
for the Northwest Complex Residential College has been expressed by 

e architect, I. M. Pei. The Provost stated that one Northwest 
Residential College proposal envisions a new approach which includes 
a separate college of 5,000 students with its own dean, faculty, 
five houses each with an in-resident master and faculty fellows, a 
four-course curriculum, more independent student study with broader 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

courses of study, heavier reliance on seminars and independent read 
ing and closer contact between the student and faculty. All the 
facilities (rooms for students, faculty offices, classrooms and 
seminar rooms, dining hall, small library, and living quarters for 
master and a few faculty fellows) for such a program would be 
located at the residential college. 

Financing of the Northwest Complex and of future 
academic buildings was discussed by Treasurer Johnson. 

Provost Tippo expressed the need for finalizing a program 
for the Northwest Complex within the next three or four weeks so 
that a firm, decision can be given to the architect, who is anxious 
to incorporate the residential college plan in the initial stages 
of design work. The discussion concluded without any vote bei 1 - 
taken. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:30 p.m. 




Alan R. Mffler 
Secretary prc^ 



] 



2690 



COMMITTEE 



Inspection of 
UM/Boston 
Contract Work 



Additional 
Renovation 
Funds Re- 
quired, 
UM/Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

February 21, 1966, 10:00a.m., Chancellor's Conference 

Room, UM/Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustee Thompson; Provost Tippo, 
Chancellor Ryan, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION : 



Mr. Rosane and Mr. Rittenbach of 
Drummey, Rosane & Anderson; 
Mr. Edward Durell Stone, Library 
Architect; Mr. Warren Haas, 
Associate Director of Libraries, 
Columbia University and Library 
Consultant to the University; 
Mr. Stanley Torkelsen and Mr. 
Edward Stevens, Assistants to 
Mr. Stone; Mr, Hugh Montgomery, 
University Librarian; Mr. Jack 
Littlefield, University Planning 
Officer. 



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Haigis at 
10:15 a.m. Mr. Richard Rosane of the firm of Drummey, Rosane & 
Anderson was introduced. With respect to the renovations contract 
work at the UM/Boston Building, he stated that the general con- 
tractor had presented no argument over items remaining to be 
finished on the punch list. Most of the remaining work consists 
of patchwork and painting. 

There followed a general inspection of renovation contract 
jobs throughout the building. These included ninth floor science 
labs and lecture rooms, the library, new stairwells and the 
cafeteria, as well as other classroom and laboratory space on 
different floors of the building. 

At the conclusion of the tour, Treasurer Johnson extended 
compliments to the architects for the soundness of their design. 

The Treasurer noted that an application for $750,000 had 
been made with the Federal Government toward further renovations 
and purchase of the building. This has received initial approval 
of the State Higher Education Facilities Grants Commission. 

President Lederle stated that the sum of $2,712,000 would 
be required for purchase of the building by the Commonwealth, and 
to renovate the structure further into first-class shape. The 
$750,000 grant will reduce this if approved to $1,962,000. 



I! 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Ryan reported that he is personally pleased 
with the quality of the contractor's work, and that the consensus 
of feeling among the UM/Boston faculty is similarly favorable. 

There being a lack of a quorum, members of the committee 
requested the chairman to make a favorable report to the full 
Board of Trustees, recommending acceptance of the contract work. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that supporters of the Cran- 
berry Research Station at Wareham had filed a request with the 
Legislature for the sum of $100,000 in addition to federal funds 
for the construction of a pesticide and plant water laboratory at 
the Cranberry Research Station. This bill was passed but without 
funds. It was noted that the Massachusetts cranberry crop repre- 
sents a $4.0,000,000 business enterprise in the Commonwealth. The 
Treasurer concluded that Dr. Cross of the Cranberry Station had 
requested that the capital outlay priorities of the University be 
amended to include this project near the top. This will come be- 
fore the committee for consideration at a future meeting. 

At this point, the committee recessed to the Statler 
Hilton Hotel, Parlor C, for a preview of the presentation to be 
made to the full Board of Trustees detailing preliminary sketches 
for the University Library. This presentation was made by archi- 
tect Edward Durell Stone and his associates, and by Mr. Warren Haas 
of Columbia University, library consultant. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:25 p.m. 



2691 




Robert Of. /McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



Lack of 
Quorum 



Proposed 
New Building, 
Cranberry 
Research 
Station 



Committee 
Recess 



:6 



' 6j 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF JOINT MEETING OF THE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND 
EDUCATIONAL POLICY AND THE CQH/MITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

March 3, 1966, 2:00 p.m., Chancellors Conference Room, H/^Boston 

PRESENT t C ommittee on Faculty and Educational Policy - 

Chairman Troy, Trustees Haigis, Lyons and Kiernan. 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds - Chairman 
Haigis, Trustees Emerson, Gordon, Maginnis and 
Thompson. 

President Lederle, Chancellor Ryan, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION ; From the UM/Boston faculty: Professors Becker, 
Goodwin, Ityan, Tanimoto and Weaver. 

Mr. Harry Hugill, Superintendent of Buildings 
and Grounds, UM/Amherst. 

This being a joint meeting, with two committees of the 
Board involved, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To designate Trustee Iyons as Chairman of 
the meeting. 

The Chairman comments that the purpose was to discuss the 
fundamental program of the University of Massachusetts/Boston. He 
referred "briefly to a prior, informal meeting held on Saturday, 
February 19, 1966, involving members of the Board of Trustees with 
Mr. Edward Logue, Director of Boston's Urban Renewal Agency. At 
that time — on a strictly informal basis — certain urban site 
possibilities for permanent location of the UM/Boston campus were 
discussed; also, in the afternoon additional metropolitan site 
possibilities within the circumference of Route 128 were explored 
with Mr. Cadigan. 

Chairman Lyons introduced Chancellor Ryan who quoted from 
his prepared statement which had been given to the Trustees. This 
statement was formulated on the basis of considering the future of 
UM/Boston in terms of the following: 

I. Objectives 

II. Enrollment 1965 - 1980 

III. Program Development 1965 - 1980 

IV. Site Criteria 

The Chancellor called the Trustees attention to other 
statements in the folder they had received reflecting positions of 
the UM/Boston faculty with respect to enrollment and scope of the 



COMMITTEE 



2693 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

program; also, statements of opposing views with respect to an 
urban or a metropolitan site location. 

The Chancellor next introduced Professor George Goodwin 
who was invited to present a summary of the projected program 
development . 

Professor Goodwin stated that considerable unanimity 
existed among the four division chairmen with respect to the 
following : 

a. The basic thrust will be far a quality 
humanities, natural sciences, and social 
sciences program. The faculty want a 
liberal core at the heart of the insti- 
tution. At the same time, however, they 
are not opposed to the development of 
special program: education courses, 
for example. 

b. The division chairmen also favor an under- 
graduate course in business — preferably 
associated with the Department of Economics. 

c. The principal difference between the 
division chairmen relates to the proposed 
development of graduate work. However, 
the chairmen do agree that a quality 
graduate program will require a great 
amount of library and laboratory space. 

Trustee Kiernan queried whether other state institutions, 
and private colleges or universities such as B.U., Northeastern, 
Simmons, etc. had been consulted with respect to the program in 
education; also, to determine what the plans and objectives of 
these institutions might be with respect to teacher training. 

Trustee Troy queried whether the intention in education 
would be to prepare students for teaching at secondary or lower 
levels. Professor Goodwin replied that the secondary level was 
contemplated, with strong emphasis on subject-matter preparation. 

President Lederle underscored Trustee Kiernan* s point 
that both public and private institutions in the greater Boston 
area should be informed of plans developed for uW'Boston. He 
noted, however, that the University would stay in the field of 
Education as appropriate, and that we might move into graduate 
level instruction in this field. 

Trustee Kiernan agreed, noting that expense of duplication 
of effort should be avoided. 



UM/Boston 
Faculty 
Position on 
Program 
Development 






2694 



COMMITTEE 



The Case 
for an 
Urban Site 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The President commented that, even in Business Administra- 
tion, \M/Bos%on would probably not develop a school or college at 
the outset, but would initiate the program within a Department of 
Economics. Professor Goodwin stated that early soundings indicated 
that the IB^/Boston faculty felt that a graduate school of business 
would be most appropriate. 

The case for an Urban Site was presented by Professor 
Alvan Ryan, Chairman of the Division of Humanities. Professor 
Ryan stated that the University of Massachusetts/Boston now has an 
opportunity to serve the purposes of a state university while, at 
the same time, fulfilling the requirements of an urban institution 
in an increasingly urban society. He felt that the University 
should open up opportunities for higher education to as many stu- 
dents as possible who otherwise would not be able to avail them- 
selves of it. 

Discussion next turned to consideration of a permanent 
site for the Uty/Boston campus. Professor Ryan presented the report 
of the sub-committee on urban site. 

The following, he said, are some of the criteria: 

a. The site must be appropriate to the 
objectives of the institution. 

b. The site must have access by public 
transportation. 

c. The site should be adequate to pre- 
sent and future needs. 

The need is to establish a first-rate university focused 
around arts and sciences in a place where we can have vital and 
dynamic interplay between the University and the city. A location 
10 to 20 miles distant from the core of the urban society sets up 
difficulties. In town is where the problems are and the action is, 
Professor Ryan continued. 

Ease of access by public transportation is of vital im- 
portance, he added. This is merely to recognize the problem posed 
by the automobile. The location should enable the faculty and 
student body to move back and forth by public transportation with- 
out exacerbating automobile and parking problems. 

Further, the site must be adequate to our present and 
future needs; it must be large enough in terms of expansion 
potential to accommodate future growth. 

Professor Ryan stated that the urban site committee 
favored decentralized architecture. He does not contemplate one 
or two great monolithic masses of buildings accommodating ten or 



INIVERS1TY OF 



1ASSACHUSETTS 



2695 



fifteen thousand persons. Some contact with nature is desirable, 
at least in immature; something green, something growing. An 
interplay between the city of Boston and the University should be 
committee an immediate purpose. The drama, art, music and other cultural 

attractions of intown Boston, he said, could not be duplicated for 
$100,000,000. In this regard, Professor Ryan and his committee 
felt that a site either at Madison Park, East Boston, or Columbia 
Point could be adequate for the intown campus which he felt would 
required at least 100 acres. 

Trustee Thompson queried whether the University might be 
able to acquire 100 acres in the core city of Boston in view of 
recent discussions with Mr. Logue of BRA. He noted that Boston 
English High School was now considering 60 acres in Madison Park. 
This contrasts with the 30 acres mentioned in the press about two 
weeks ago. 

Trustee Kieraan stated that the Department of Education 
had put its blessing on Madison Park as a site for the high school. 
This complex, he said, will involve 5,000 students with the Common- 
wealth underwriting 4-0 to 50 percent of the total cost. If 60 acres 
remain involved, TB^/Boston would be badly cramped. 

President Lederle added that Mr. Logue had made it plain 
that an appropriate "in lieu of taxes" payment would be required 
wherever the University might locate in downtown Boston. The 
President stated that it would be difficult to take the urban 
renewal approach unless we know how much acreage we will get. We 
will need to know what we must do with every square foot, he added. 
Assuming that only a small site were available, the President ex- 
pressed some skepticism about having faculty offices and various 
disciplines scattered in decentralized buildings on a small site, 
even without residence halls. 

Professor Ryan clarified his conception of the decentral- 
ized campus. The library would be at the center, similar to the 
campus plan at the University of Massachusetts/Amherst . Academic 
buildings would then be placed around this center. He proposed a 
"common use" type of office for faculty members involving multiple 
occupancy at varying and specified hours for student contact work, 
with the faculty member ! s private work office located elsewhere. 

Chancellor Ryan commented that, from a timing point of 
view, TB^/Boston should have approximately four to five thousand 
students to move onto a new site by the time it becomes available. 

The case for a Metropolitan Site was presented by Pro- 
fessor Ernest Becker. He agreed strongly with Professor Ryan with 
respect to the Urban Site committee* s objectives. These, he said, 
are the proper aims and goals regardless of where we locate. But 
he sketched a different "kind of city" than that which the urban 
group described. 



Case for a 
Metropolitan 
Site ' 



26 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



There are, lie said, 700,000 people in downtown Boston 
proper — a small faction only of the total population of the 
total population of the metropolitan area. In contrast, greater 
Boston has been growing in the decade between 1950 and I960 by 
180,000 persons a year. We feel, he said, that to be central to 
the problems of Boston ten or twenty years hence will pose a differ- 
ent solution than that offered by a downtown location. Most future 
problems will be met and solved somewhere in the metropolitan 
complex. 

Transportation inside Route 128 — eight to ten miles 
from Boston Common — is a serious problem, Professor Becker 
admitted. But it can be bridged. His committee feels that a site 
somewhere in the metropolitan area involving 250 acres with 1,000 
faculty members, 15,000 students and 200 staff members would 
create sufficient demand on MTA. or some other transportation 
facility to call for laying in a new transportation roadbed. Or, 
an alternative might be to use JM bus transportation to pick up 
commuters from a variety of drop points around the city. One does 
not have to live in the midst of a needy neighborhood in order to 
assist it, he added. University personnel can become available to 
service such areas from the adjacent suburbs. 

Finally, Professor Becker said a limited number of resi- 
dence halls are desirable even at a commuter university. We should 
have a broadening cross -pollination of out-of-state and/or inter- 
national students; also, accommodations for visiting professors 
and lecturers. 

Trustee Iyons observed that transportation indeed, is a 
much greater problem in the outlying suburbs. He noted that it is 
conceivable to see downtown Boston as the center of institutional 
life (if not residential life); therefore, in-town Boston does 
remain "the Hub." One can "spoke in" from greater Boston with as 
great or even greater facility than "spoking out." 

Trustee Maginnis queried where the present center of 
population is inside of Route 128. Mr. Gordon responded that there 
was apparently no real center at this time. Professor Becker 
offered the opinion that the center would be in the vicinity of 
Brookline, or just to its west. It was noted that 50 years from 
now the entire area within the Route 128 loop will be densely 
populated. 

Trustee Troy raised the question of nighttime as well as 
daytime use of a downtown university site. He expressed strong 
feeling that the University should not consider leaving downtown 
Boston simply because of temporary conditions involving slum areas. 
Our job, he said, is simply to clear these away and build a new, 
low-cost, urban, commuter institution. 



COMMITTEE 






2697 



unive:rsity of Massachusetts 



Chancellor Ryan cited the paper entitled "Statement on 
a Metropolitan Area Site," prepared by Mathew R. Sgan, Dean of 
Student Affairs, which statement had been made available to the 
Trustees. This paper had noted that the central city (downtown 
Boston) population had dropped between 1950 and I960 from a popula- 
tion of 801,444 to 697,197, whereas the metropolitan area population 
had increased in the same period from 2,410,572 to 2,595,481. 

Trustee Maginnis observed that the real question is, 
"What kind of university do we want?" 

In response, Professor Weaver stated that a principal 
objective should be to remove the students mentally from the sub- 
culture they find themselves in and put them into the environment 
of the scholar. Mr. Troy queried whether the student living in 
Lexington, for example, does not get a different sub-cultural 
environment by commuting into downtwon Boston. 

Professor Goodwin brought up the question of "psycho- 
logical distance." Waltham, he said, is the "end of the world" for 
some students who may reside in Roxbury. On the other hand, he was 
familiar with the case of a student enrolled at a well-known 
suburban institution who really didn't know how to get intown to 
the State House. 

Trustee Maginnis queried whether we were going to have a 
different university if we located in metropolitan Boston as 
opposed to selecting an urban site. Professor Tanimoto responded 
that he felt that this would make a difference. The objectives, he 
said, may be the same; but the most weighty argument for a 
suburban site really rests on the availability of more land for 
expansion purposes. 

Trustee Gordon re-emphasized that a half-truth exists in 
the concept that students will gravitate to a university campus 
regardless of whether it is located in a metropolitan or an in-town 
location. Belmont, Lexington or Waltham students may come in town, 
providing we are located downtown, he said; but the reverse is not 
true. He referred the Trustees to the current statistics concern- 
ing the residence sources of the present IB^/Boston student body. 
Downtown is where our mandate lies, Mr. Gordon said. He read a 
brief quotation from a speech by William L. Pereira of the American 
Institute of Architects, as follows: 

"University ought to participate in the 

cultural renewal of our cities 

encouraging the arts and development of 
public taste, mitigating vast differences 
...... .performing (in effect) the function 

that medieval cathedrals performed for 
the cities of the middle ages " 



Further 
Discussion 
and Queries 
from the 
Trustees 



2698 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Professo Ryan concurred with Trustee Gordon that this 
quotation expressed the philosophy of the urban site group. Comment 
was invited from representatives of the Metropolitan Site Committee. 

Professor Weaver offered one reaction: that the Metro- 
politan Site Committee favors removing the student from his sub- 
culture regardless of where it may be located. Trustee I^yons 
wondered whether CCNY or NYU achieved this objective in the City of 
New York. 

Professor Becker responded that there was a decline in 
CCNY's attempt to mix with negro groups. If we look at Boston 
proper as the city, he added, we may be out of line twenty or thirty 
years from now. I personally have seen the need for space for a 
faculty member increase enormously since my own undergraduate and 
graduate days, he continued, adding that this trend is likely to 
continue and increase, with new kinds of space requirements emerging 
in the future. 

Trustee Emerson queried whether the metropolitan site 
group had done any family income research or investigation of the 
value of the existing cultural entities within Boston proper. The 
response was negative. 

Trustee Haigis stated that the University's presence in 
the city of Boston is for the student's parents as well as for the 
student himself. He felt that downtown Boston would still maintain 
its identity as the core city in the future. In his view, it was 
not impossible to consider two or three hundred acres in a downtown 
site, since this might be obtainable through a constructive program 
of urban renewal. 

Trustee Thompson commented that the original purpose of 
establishing the U^/Boston campus was to move into the Boston area , 
regardless of where the site might eventually be. In his opinion, 
Columbia Point was a poor choice. Students, he said, will go to 
the perimeter if we are located there. He reminded the Trustees 
that he had asked Mr. Edward Logue, director of Boston's Urban Re- 
newal Agency, whether the population appeared to be coming back to 
Boston at this time, after the (already cited) statistical emigra- 
tion of the 1950 f s. Mr. Logue had answered in the negative. Mr. 
Thompson feels that the University should get as close as possible 
to the center of the metropolitan area and draw from all directions. 

Trustee Gordon observed that we should re-examine our 
mandate. Building in Milton, for example, Mr. Gordon said, would 
be safe. No doublt we could fill a campus there. But this is not 
what the Legislature had in mind. No commitments on site were made 
to the Legislature when the XM/Boston bill was enacted. The basic 
question is, he added, "What is our real role here?" 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF 



1ASSACHUSETTS 



Chancellor Ryan returned to the original question posed 
by Trustee Maginnis. There is no doubt, he said, that the XM/ 
Boston philosophy is that we will be an urban institution. We must, 
of course, look at all the problems that stand in the way. The 
Chancellor stated that he felt personally that we should be as close 
as possible to the present site of the li^Boston campus. I hope, 
he added, that the Trustees will move to an urban site: Madison 
Park, for example, if enough space is made available there. My 
opinion, he concluded, is that we must develop this institution as 
an urban campus with support programs, institutes, appropriate re- 
search and graduate offerings. 

Trustee Maginnis raised the question of whether there was 
any difficulty about the University 1 s ability to attract faculty, 
either downtown to an urban site or outside to a metropolitan site. 
President Lederle noted that the existing faculty, for the most 
part, lives in the metropolitan or suburban complex. 

"Let ! s think off the chart," President Lederle said. 
"Why not have a sub-unit of \M/Boston right on the present site at 
100 Arlington Street, but have the remainder of the campus located 
elsewhere?" Trustee Lyons expressed the view that such a split 
campus might tend to segregate the underprivileged. 

Trustee Maginnis stated emphatically that the entire 
question seems to come down to one point: can we or can we not 
obtain sufficient land (approximately 200 acres) on a downtown site? 
In response, Trustee Gordon observed that he felt that the Madison 
Park location offered ample opportunity for reasonable future 
expansion. 

Treasurer Johnson observed that Mr. Logue's opinions 
concerning site availability really reflect what he (Logue) feels, 
as director of BRA., that he can obtain for federal financing in 
terms of the acres available. 

Professor Ryan added that, if we make a strong approach 
now with respect to BRA, we will be in "mid-stream of the nation 1 s 
#1 priority" in terms of federal assistance programs. 

Trustee Gordon urged those present who live in Boston to 
recall, in the Logue era, the violent objections of citizens in 
south Boston, Charlestown and elsewhere to the acquisition of 
property by BRA through eminent domain. He stressed that no public 
protest was discernible to date with respect to the Madison Park 
area. He urged that an immediate study be made of how much land 
Director Logue would be able to commit to the University in Madison 
Park and vicinity. 

Chairman lyons urged the group to define at this point 
what specifically needed to be done. 



Q 



2700 



COMMITTEE 



Re c omme nda t i ons 
of Chancellor 
Ryan 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chancellor Ryan quoted briefly the three recommendations 
which concluded his "Chancellor 1 s Statement" as follows: 

1. SITE : That the Trustees give highest 
priority to an inner city location in 
the Madison Park area, providing that 
between 100 and 200 acres are made 
available; also that financial and 
other requirements of the BRA and 
the city of Boston can be determined 
and met in a reasonable period of 
time including: 

(a) purchase price 

(b) agreements regarding pay- 
ments in lieu of taxes 

(c) procedures regarding 
architects, selection and 
design approval 

2. PROGRAM : That the Trustees endorse 
the concept that UW/Boston will place 
first priority on developing a high 
quality undergraduate program in 
liberal arts incorporating elementary 
and secondary education, and business 
administration options; also, that it 
will develop high quality graduate 
programs as required, and that by 
1980, several professional and graduate 
programs will have been inaugurated. 

3. EN ROLLMENT : That the Trustess concur 
with the general expectancy that TM/ 
Boston enrollment may reach 15,000 
full-time students by 1980 — not on 
the basis of a commitment to maintain 
an annual growth rate of 1,000 full- 
time students — but rather as an 
estimate of what IB^/Boston should be 
prepared to do to meet the problems 
and demand for college admissions and 
the shortage of professionally edu- 
cated persons over the next 15 years. 

Treasurer Johnson mentioned the necessity of getting down 
to practical matters and defining things quite precisely before 
approaching Mr. Logue and the BRA. We must be able to determine 
that X number of acres will be required by a certain date, and X 
additional acres by a still later date for this or that specific 
purpose. He reminded the Trustees that the hearing on purchase of 



2701 



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COMMITTEE 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



the UM/Boston building will be held at the State House next week, 
and that we must attend to first things first. Trustee Gordon 
agreed with the Treasurer, adding that the matter of spelling out 
specific objectives in a two-way street. He felt that the first 
route of procedure should be: 

(a) to use the University of Illinois 
downtown Chicago campus as a proto- 
type and find out what the "meets 
and bounds" of the available 
Madison Park acreage might be on 
an informal basis. 

(b) on the assumption that we will 
need a sizeable amount of acreage, 
to determine informally and pri- 
vately with Mr. Logue and the BRA. 
some rough idea of what will be 
expected in lieu of taxes. 

Mr. Gordon urged that we move quickly. Trustee Haigis 
expressed the opinion that the University will/welcome in the 
Madison Park area. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:05 p.m. 




Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Bdard of Trustees 



I 



2702 



COMMITTEE 



Admissions 
Problems & 
Policies 
Report 



Faculty 
Appointment 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND 

EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

March 10, 1966, 11:00 a.m., President's Office, U of M 



PRESENT : Chairman Troy; President Lederle; 

Trustees Haigis, Lyons and Plimpton; 
Provost Tippo, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Dean Moore, Professor Clay, 

Professor Richason, Dr. Venman 

The meeting was called to order by Chairman Troy at 
11:00 a.m. Dr. William Tunis, Dean of Admissions, was introduced 
to present a report on admissions policies and problems. 

Dr. Tunis presented charts on freshman and transfer 
applications contrasting the year 1961 with 1965. In this period 
freshman applications rose from 6,521 to 14, 123; transfer applica- 
tions from 878 to 2,031. As of March 8, 1966, Dr. Tunis reported 
that 18,217 applications had been received. Last year, he had pre- 
dicted that the University would receive between 15 and 20 thousand 
applications for the entering class in 1966. 

Discussion followed on factors related to the admissions 
picture including the various predictive factors utilized by the 
admissions office in making selections; the annual program of high 
school visitations, in which every public high school and selected 
parochial high schools in the Commonwealth are visited by a team 
from the admissions office. Sample folders of admissions cases 
were distributed to the members of the Committee. 

Dean Tunis indicated that his office had accepted more 
than 4,000 students for next fall against an expected entering 
class of 3,100 freshmen at Amherst and 1,000 at \M/Boston. He 
indicated that we operate on a "rolling admissions" policy. May 2 
is the cut-off date for admissions replies for 1966. After this 
date, the attrition rate on accepted students diminishes appreciably. 
Dean Tunis summarized the essence of the admissions policy as 
follows: a quota of students is set by the administration and the 
Board of Trustees for enrollment in any given year. The admissions 
office then examines the pool of applicants and screens this group 
for the very best students obtainable from the applications. He 
reported that there were approximately 300 undergraduate students 
now enrolled who were children or grandchildren of alumni. 

Provost Tippo reported on interviews he had held with 
Professor John R. Dixon who holds a B.S. and M.S. degree from 
M.I.T. and who has a Ph.D. from Carnegie Institute of Technology. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF 



IASSACHUSETTS 



He has taught at Purdue and Swarthmore. The Provost indicated that 
he was impressed with this applicant and hoped that the committee 
and the Board of Trustees would act favorably on his appointment 
as Head of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. The Committee 
signified approval. 

The Provost next commented on the very extensive search 
running over three years for a Dean of Engineering. He stated that 
the screening committee was recommending unanimously Dr. K. G. 
Picha, presently director of the School of Mechanical Engineering 
at Georgia Institute of Technology. 

The committee next adjourned for luncheon in the Dukes 
Room at the Student Union, where they were joined by Dr. Picha. 
After an interview period during which there was a mutual exchange 
of questions and expression of philosophy on the question of engi- 
neering education between members of the committee and Dr. Picha, 
it was moved, seconded and unanimously 

VOTED ! To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the appointment of Dr. K. G. Picha as 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
with tenure and Dean of the College of 
Engineering. 

Provost Tippo and Professor David Clay of the Department 
of Philosophy outlined a proposal for the creation of University 
College — a refinement and extension of the concept of the resi- 
dential college systems already in effect within the University. 
Reference was made to the preface and detailed outline of this pro- 
posal contained in Document 66-061, which document has been 
forwarded to members of the Board of Trustees. 

Chairman Troy stated that he was enormously impressed 
with the concept and felt that this would go a long way toward 
avoiding dehumanization of the University as we grow in size. 
Other Trustees expressed their enthusiasm. 



Provost Tippo pointed out that the creation of University 
College may require some legislative action with respect to the 
University Building Authority in order to accommodate the construc- 
tion of academic as well as living space. 

In response to queries from various members of the com- 
mittee, it was indicated that election of University College by 
students would be optional with an anticipated enrollment of 1,000 
in 1969. 

President Lederle observed that he believes in experiment- 
ing within institutions, and Provost Tippo credited the President 
with the initial idea of University College. 



2703 



Dean of 
Engineering 



University 
College 



2704 



COMMITTEE 



Approval of 

Graduate 

Courses 



General 
Chemistry 
Courses for 
Non-Science 

Majors 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



After further discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they approve in principle the 
concept of creating University College, 
subject to the availability of financing 
and any necessary legislative approval, 
as outlined in Document 66-061, which 
document is herewith attached to and 
made a part of these minutes. 

Dr. Edward C. Moore, Dean of the Graduate School, was 
invited to detail for the committee the nature of new graduate 
level courses in the fields of art, fisheries biology and 
psychology. After brief discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they approve the adoption of the 
new graduate level courses detailed 
under Section A of Document 66-058, 
which document is herewith attached to 
and made a part of these minutes. 

Professor George Richason of the Department of Chemistry 
was invited to present detail on a two-semester course in General 
Chemistry for non-science majors. He noted that there are now 
three basic courses in Chemistry as follows: 

a. Advanced Placement 

b. Professional 

c. General Chemistry 

Under this system, Dr. Richason said, social science and 
humanities majors are sometimes disadvantaged. Experience has 
showed that these students require a broad perspective course. 

After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 
it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

the approval of the two-semester sequence 
in Chemistry: General Chemistry for non- 
science majors - 101 (I) and General 
Chemistry for non-science majors - 102 (II). 

After brief discussion and review, and upon motion and 
seconded, it was unanimously 



COMMITTEE 



* 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the approval of other undergraduate 
courses as detailed in Section B, 
paragraphs 2,3,4,5,6,7 and 8 in 
Document 66-058. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:00 p.m. 




<■/) 



( i£L^i 



Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



2705 



Other 

Undergraduate 
Courses 
Approved 



COMMITTEE 



Residence 
Hall Rates 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
March 14, 1966, 4:00 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Emerson, Gordon, 
Maginnis, Thompson and Weldon; 
Provost Tippo, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 

Treasurer Johnson presented a proposal to establish 
residence hall rates that v/ould equalize student room rates across 
the campus in all residence halls at $350.00 for two semesters. 
This is the same as the rate previously approved that will be in 
effect in Southwest Complex this September. Detailed cost studies 
and recommendations had been forwarded to the committee in advance 
which showed that, with the elimination of overcrowding that has 
existed for five years and a return to normal occupancy this fall, 
most of the self-liquidating buildings - old and new- - will be in 
a deficit position. The Treasurer said that exhaustive studies have 
been made by his office in cooperation with the Dean of Students 
and the Housing Office and reluctantly the only solution is to in- 
crease the rates. In doing so, a plan is proposed that v/ould make 
all rates uniform at $350.00 a year. This will permit in the first 
two years reserves for furniture replacement, refurbishing where 
needed in older buildings, and a cushion against increasing con- 
struction costs now 6% per year in the Amherst area. Such a plan 
might stabilize the rates in new dorms for three or four years. 
Otherwise, these rates would of necessity go above $350.00 if the 
buildings are to liquidate. 

Even at $350.00 the University v/ould be low in New England 
as shown by comparable room rents that were circulated. 

Trustee Thompson voiced strong opposition to the size of 
the increase from $200.00 in the older dormitories. He questioned 
the desirability of equalizing the rates. 

After extensive discussion, it was agreed to defer action 
until the next meeting scheduled for Monday, April 11, 1966, at 
10:30 a.m. in the President's Office in Amherst. The Treasurer v/as 
asked to forward a schedule showing a $50.00 per year increase on 
the older dorms. This schedule is attached as part of these 
minutes. 



The meeting was adjourned at 5:05 p.m. 



r 




: -i>M 




Robert J. McCartne 
Secretary,' Board of Trustees 




COMMITTEE 



UNIVERS8TY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
April 11, 1966, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, U of M 



PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Emerson, Gordon, 
Maginnis and Thompson; Provost Tippo, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney 

PRESENT BY 

INVITATION : Mr. Harry Hugill, Director of 

Physical Plant, Planning Officer 
Littlefield, Miss Laura McDill 
and Messrs. Galehouse and Otis of 
Sasaki, Dawson & Demay; William 
Field, Dean of Students. 

Chairman Haigis called the meeting to order at 10:30 a.m. 
He introduced Mr. Richard Galehouse, who, in turn, introduced his 
associates, Miss Laura McDill and Mr. Samuel Otis of Sasaki, Dawson 
and Demay. 

Miss McDill presented a series of slides and cross 
referenced them to a relief model of the terrain and neighborhood 
in the Madison Park and adjacent Highland Park area of Boston. 

At the conclusion of the presentation, Mr. Galehouse 
advised the committee that it was not yet clear how many acres 
would be available for a UM/Boston campus site. The area covered 
in the presentation involved approximately 165 acres, but these 
include several schools and churches. 

Discussion followed on some of the UM/Boston permanent 
site requirements. Included are a two million volume library with 
seating capacity for 25% of the student body; classroom space on 
the basis of 220 net square feet per student, with faculty offices 
included in the units. There would be provision for administra- 
tive space, dining commons, athletic facilities and two auditoria, 
one seating 3,000 persons; a second seating 1,000. Warehousing 
facilities would approximate 180,000 square feet at the 25,000 
student enrollment level. The question of parking is an unknown 
quantity at this time. It was stressed that some of these 
projections were preliminary and tentative. 

Mr. Otis ran several theoretical tests on the site. He 
demonstrated that 165 acres would provide very tight building 
density if construction were predicated upon 1.5 square feet of 
building space for every 1 square foot of campus space. The 
construction density of the space decreased, however, as the 
projections shown moved tov/ard higher rise buildings. The con- 
cluding density demonstration on the relief map showed 25,000 



2707 



Preliminary 

Survey, 

Potential 

UM/Boston 

Site 



2708 



COMMITTEE 



Continued 
Renovation 
Design 
UM/Boston 
Building 
"by Drumrney, 
Rosane , 
Anderson 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

students contained in five L4-story academic buildings plus library, 
administrative, and other structures. Extensive discussion 
followed on the advantages and drawbacks of the Madison-Highland 
Park area as a potential campus site. The location is easily 
accessible by present and planned future public transportation and 
highways. At the same time, it is bounded and would not be an easy 
location from which to expand beyond the 165-168 acres. There are 
steep grades composed of pudding stone with some granite ledges. 

Mr. Galehouse indicated that the location would provide 
a magnificent site which rates 100% on location and access. He 
reviewed the customary procedure of urban renewal agencies in 
general and the Boston Renewal Agency in particular with respect 
to acquisition of land for redevelopment. It was concluded that, 
while the potential location needs much more study, there is no 
real reason for delay in approaching the Boston Renewal Agency with 
an expression of preliminary interest. 

Treasurer Johnson noted that, while the site is "bounded", 
the area will be surrounded by good neighbors. Further discussion 
centered on the urgency of moving ahead at an early date to provide 
preliminary information for the Board of Trustees by the May meet- 
ing. It was deemed desirable to advise Mayor Collins and the 
Boston Renewal Agency of our interest in the area on the basis of 
160 to 200 acres. 

After further comment, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To authorize the Administration to discuss 
with Mayor Collins and the Boston Renewal 
Agency the University's interest in acquiring 
acreage in Madison and Highland Parks as a 
permanent site for UM/Boston, excluding the 
site reserved for Boston English High School 
in Madison Park, and the Administration was 
directed to hold a prior discussion with 
Mr. Thomas E. Eisenstat, chairman of the 
Boston School Committee, with respect to 
that Committee ' s plans for the high school 
in Madison Park. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the University expects to 
receive $750,000 in Federal Funds to assist with the purchase and 
renovation of UM/Boston. Further, it appears that the Legislature 
will support purchase of the present building and authorize con- 
tinued renovations. Since, under the policies of the Housing and 
Home Finance Agency, all work must be done under a single contract, 
it is important that work proceed as soon as possible on design. 
The Treasurer stated that, if the present purchase bill clears the 
Legislature, funds for continued renovation of the building will be 
included. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the firm of Drummey, Rosane and 
Anderson be appointed to proceed with 
further designs for the renovation of 
the UM/Boston building. 

At this point, the committee adjourned for lunch in the 
Student Union. 

The Committee next considered item 7 on the agenda, a 
new building for the Cranberry Station in Wareham. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the last Legislature 
passed an act (Chapter 84.9) authorizing the Board of Trustees to 
construct a building and spend such funds as might be appropriated 
(in addition to $60,000 in Federal Funds which were available) for 
the construction of a research facility at the Cranberry Station 
in Wareham. The question is whether the Trustees would wish to 
move this project up on the capital outlay priority list. 

Discussion followed on whether any private funds from 
the Cranberry Industry might be brought into this project. It was 
decided to postpone action in this matter pending discussion with 
representatives of the Cranberry Industry, Dean Spielman, the 
Master Planning Committee and Commissioner McNamara. 

The Chairman called upon Treasurer Johnson to present a 
further study of the Residence Hall Rate structure undertaken by 
his office after the last meeting of the committee. 

The Treasurer distributed to members of the committee a 
schedule sheet detailing an alternate plan for residence hall 
rates beginning in September 1966, showing the financial picture 
if rates were increased by $50 per annum over the next three years 
(from $200 to $350). 

Dean Field was invited to comment on the effect which the 
present rate structure in residence halls has on the student body; 
also, to express his view of student reaction to a $150 increase 
in charges in the old dormitories. The Dean stated that there was, 
at present, "no feeling of democratic equality" now that the 
established residence hall rates are $150 apart. He favored an 
equal rate structure, "preferably at lower cost"; but, "we must be 
realistic," he concluded. Rates at other New England universities 
indicate most are' above $350. 

Treasurer Johnson observed that the real question is 
whether we wish to adhere to the self- liquidation principle or not 
in amortizing our residence halls. 



2709 



Building for 

Cranberry 

Station 



Residence 
Hall Rates 



2710 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Dean Field pointed out that some student reaction could 
be anticipated in the event of a $150 increase. On the other hand, 
he pointed out that approximately one-third of the students are 
already housed at the $300 figure. 

"We want to be at a point where we can plan consistently 
for the future with respect to furniture replacement, renovations, 
etc.," he said. The Dean stated that no appropriate sum for this 
purpose was now in prospect. 

President Lederle commented that the Commonwealth is not 
likely to "bil out" the old dormitories in terms of needed upkeep, 
renovations and repair since they are carried on a self- liquidating 
basis. We simply have to face the fact that student costs must 
rise. 

Treasurer Johnson noted once again that the former 
estimate of $72 per bed to maintain residence halls in the new 
projects had now risen — five years later — to an actual 
maintenance cost of approximately $100 per bed. He noted that, on 
the basis of $2,600,000 worth of furnishings inventory in the 
residence halls, a reserve fund of 10% or($260,000) appears 
entirely reasonable for upkeep, renovation and maintenance. 

Trustee Thompson stated that he was not opposed to a $50 
rise in the residence hall fee. He was opposed, to an annual $50 
increase for the next three years. He added that he would be more 
comfortable with a ruling from the Attorney General with respect 
to the legality of adding to room rents on the old buildings, 
already amortized, and retaining part of the income in a trust fund, 
while returning $200 to the Commonwealth. 

The Treasurer responded that this formula is identical to 
that operative for years in the Student Union where all revenues 
are received, amortization costs paid as required, and. the balance 
spent on operation of the facility. 

There was brief discussion of the feasibility of 
establishing a $350 residence hall fee for freshman only over the 
next three years. 

After further discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
all residence hall fees be established at 
a uniform rate of $350, effective in 
September, 1966. 

Trustee Thompson is recorded in opposition to the above 
vote on the basis of his opinion that the increase in residence 
hall fees is not necessary at this time. Prior to absenting him- 
self from the meeting, Trustee Emerson requested to be recorded in 

favor of the $350 across-the-board fee. 



I 



(1 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF 



IASSACHUSETTS 



It was agreed that before presenting the formal votes on 
the increase that had been prepared by legal counsel, the Presi- 
dent and Treasurer would explore the issue further. 

At the request of Treasurer Johnson, the Chairman con- 
sented to defer consideration of item 4 on the agenda, "Apartment 
and Staff Housing Rate Policy and Rate Changes," 

Treasurer Johnson reminded the Committee that the re- 
quested $275,000 in planning money for the Continuing Education 
Center had not been approved by the Legislature. This building on 
which a preliminary study has been made by Marcel Breuer is an ex- 
pansion of the present Student Union plus space for continuing 
education. He presented a plan for self- liquidation of the 
project. The question is whether it is possible to liquidate the 
project through expansion of the Student Union operation into the 
Continuing Education Center. Projecting operation of the store 
and cafeteria at 10$ above costs, the Treasurer expressed the 
opinion that we should be able to operate the combined facilities 
on a self- liquidating basis, after the Continuing Education Center 
is constructed. At a cost of nine million dollars by increasing 
the present $10.00 per semester Student Union rate to $15.00 per 
semester beginning in 1967, the building can be self- liquidated 
from student and conferee fees. 

The Treasurer reported that the Chairman of the Univer- 
sity Building Authority agrees that the proposed financing 
schedule on a self- liquidating basis appears feasible. If the 
Building Authority handles this, the project could be put into de- 
sign and construction started approximately in one year. The need 
for expanded Student Union facilities is urgent. There is great 
need to move with all speed possible to alleviate present over- 
crowding in the Union, 

President Lederle commented that the Continuing Education 
part of the facility should not be paid for by the students. In- 
come from continuing education should be developed. There is also 
a legal question concerning linkage of the present Union building, 
owned by the old University of Massachusetts Building Association 
with a new facility operated by the University., of Massachusetts 
Building Authority. There is a further question, if the Center is 
to be self- liquidated, whether the facility could accommodate cer- 
tain outside agencies including the Labor Relations and Research 
Center. 

The Treasurer noted that the Continuing Education Center 
would be scheduled to receive room rent receipts and conference 
fees . The funding might involve a procedure whereby a portion of 
the Student Union fee could be reserved and split two ways: to the 
old Association, and to the University Building Authority. This 
concept has been used in the Stadium and the boarding halls. The 
Commonwealth would provide heat, light and utilities. 



2711 



Item 4 
Deferred 



Self-Liquida- 
tion of the 
Continuing 
Education 
Center 



2712 



COMMITTEE 

University 
Building 
Authority Re- 
quested to 
Construct Con- 
tinuing Educa- 
tion Center 



Renovation of 
Student Union 
Interior 



Road 

Contract 

Approved 



Final Plans 

Bartlett 

East 



Graduate 
Research 
Center 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After brief discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Authority that they 
undertake further design with Marcel 
Breuer and construction of the Continuing 
Education Center on a self- liquidating 
basis. 

After brief discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Trustees that not to 
exceed $150,000 now available in Student 
Union Reserve Fund be allocated for 
renovation and redesign of the "Hatch 
area" of the Student Union, and that the 
firm of Drummey, Rosane and Anderson be 
appointed as architects for the project. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the University was seek- 
ing a contract on road construction for the thoroughfare (running 
parallel to stadium road) from Amity Street north to North Hadley 
Road, east to Sunset Avenue, also intersecting with Fearing Street. 
Funds are available for this. The Treasurer hopes to award the 
contract to the low bidder before the next meeting. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Director of Physical 
Plant Hugill presented the final plans of Bartlett-East for in- 
spection by members of the Committee. It was noted that the State 
has insisted upon a unit ventilation type of system over the 
objection of the faculty who complain of the noise from such units. 
The unit system costs less. After inspection and brief discussion 
and upon motion made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they accept and approve the final plans for 
Bartlett - East. 

Treasurer Johnson presented a new capital outlay schedule 
reflecting an abridged construction schedule now contemplated for 
the Graduate Research Center in the first phases. This would call 
for construction of the first tower, the library wing and the 
computer center wing. The Treasurer reported that 3.5 million 
dollars in federal funds is available in addition to the 6 million 
from the State. It is planned to go to the Legislature for an 
additional 7 million dollars for the first tower and the two wings. 

The President reported that the plan put forth last year 
by the Ways and Means Committees of building the entire project at 
once is now not feasible because sufficient funds were not appro- 
priated. The delay has been costly through construction cost 



I 



COMMITTEE 



2713 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



escalation. It also has placed a premium now on getting deferred 
academic buildings such as the Fine Arts Center funded and built 
to provide space for the increasing student enrollment. 



I 



The meeting was adjourned at 3:50 p.m. 




Robert <K/ McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



I 



2714 



COMMITTEE 



Medical 

School 

Report 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF JOINT MEETING OF THE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
AND THE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

April 21, 1966, 10:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis and Troy, President Lederle; 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds : Trustees 
Brown, Emerson, Gordon, Maginnis, Thompson, 
Weldon, Croce*, Plimpton* and Solomon*; 
Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy : 
Trustees Haigis, Lyons, Plimpton, Rowland, 
Solomon, Croce*; Provost Tippo, Chancellor 
Ryan, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney 



PRESENT BY 
INVITATION: 



Dean Soutter of the Medical School 



* By invitation 

By general consent, Trustee Troy was designated to chair 
the meeting. The first order of business was discussion on a 
memorandum presented by Dean Soutter outlining certain problems 
relating to progress of the Medical School. 

Dean Soutter suggested that the University could take one 
of three approaches with respect to growth of the Medical School 
and ancillary health sciences services: (a) proceed now with plans 
for a Medical School and hospital only; (b) examine the question of 
what the State really needs, but assume a passive attitude and let 
the Commonwealth take the lead on what additional services are 
provided; (c) assume a positive position, and exert leadership in 
suggesting what ancillary areas should be explored and developed. 

Dean Soutter indicated that a growth is bound to occur, 
regardless of which position is assumed by the Trustees. In the 
Dean's opinion, a dental school is needed and will develop sooner 
or later, and it would be better to have this school associated 
with the Medical School. In terms of designing buildings for the 
future, it would help the architects to know now whether later 
expansion is contemplated. Discussion followed on the feasibility 
of establishing a school of veterinary medicine somewhere in New 
England. It was pointed out that these schools are very nearly as 
expensive to establish as a medical school; also, that the six- 
stated area could probably get by with only one. Dean Soutter 
stated that discussion with the medical school architects will get 
down to specifics very shortly. This is necessary in order to 
complete the applications for Federal matching funds. 

With respect to the questions raised in Dean Soutter 1 s 
memorandum dated April 13, 1966, already distributed tot he Board 
of Trustees (Document 66-069), the following comments were made: 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF 



IASSACHUSETTS 



Question 1 : Should medical science building plans be 
advanced in priority ahead of plans for 
the hospital? 

Dr. Soutter pointed out that the hospital will be much 
more complicated to design than the medical science building. 
Approximately five and one-half years would be required for 
hospital design prior to the September in which it is planned to 
open the Medical School. He stated that he would rather see the 
Medical School open minus the hospital in the first year, assuming 
that we could then take the time to do an excellent job with the 
University hospital design. Hospitals in the Worcester area could 
be used for the first year if necessary. 

Dean Soutter noted that there was approximately a 6% rise 
in construction costs during the past six months. He also observed 
that Pennsylvania State University had experienced a routine situa- 
tion in their application to the Federal Government for funds in 
support of the medical science building, whereas the University of 
Connecticut which applied for funds in support of both a hospital 
and medical science facility had experience some difficulty and 
delay. 

In response to a query, it was brought out that none of 
the architects has yet received a contract. All have letters of 
intent from Mr. Horace Chase of the Bureau of Building Construction 
It was stressed that good design will be needed in order to insure 
efficiency of operation of the entire complex. 



Question 2 : 



Should the University notify the Depart- 
ment of Mental Health by May, 1966, as 
to which buildings on the Worcester 
site it wants vacated? 



2715 



Dean Soutter stated that we might be able to start some 
construction as early as the summer of 1967 on the site of the 
Medical School in Worcester. With this prospect in view, should 
not the University give the Department of Mental Health at least 
one year f s notice prior to occupying existing buildings? 

Trustee Solomon noted that the agreement was that the 
University would help to relocate the dispossessed facilities. 

After further discussion, it was agreed that site plans 
and timetables should be finalized as soon as possible with Sasaki, 
Dawson and Demay; also, that Commissioner Solomon should be 
advised of these decisions as soon as possible. 

Question 3 : Shall we have a nursing program or 
school in Worcester? 

After brief discussion, it was agreed that the interest 
of the University would best be served by establishing a nursing 
program in Worcester. 



2716 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Question 4- : In what units should the hospital 
be constructed? 

It was agreed that it is architecturally sound to con- 
sider building the hospital in a first unit of 400 beds to which 
a later, second unit of 400 beds (or less) could be added. Should 
future developments indicate a distant expansion requirement for 
additional beds, then the third unit would be designed from scratch. 

Question 5: Status of the Salary Ceiling Bill? 

The President reported that the legislative leadership 
had been approached with respect to the importance of the Salary 
Ceiling Bill. Considerable press support has been musted in favor 
of the legislation. There is no immediate forecast of when legis- 
lative action may occur. 

Question 6 : What can be done to straighten out 
the Medical School budget? 

After brief discussion the consensus was that the Medical 
School budget for the fiscal year 1967 as sent to the Legislature 
by the Governor is totally unrealistic. The President noted that 
it is usually difficult to raise or adjust a Governor's budget once 
it is presented. It is hoped to have Messrs. Tynan and Rigney on 
the campus soon for serious discussion on this matter. The problem 
is a very grave one. 



Question 7 : 



What is the Trustees 1 opinion on 
the question of forming a combined 
medical library with the V/orcester 
Medical Library? 



Dean Soutter reported that the Worcester Medical Library 
is a nice, small collection. The proposed merger would still 
permit both libraries to preserve their identities. If the 
V/orcester Medical Library were moved into our facility, this would 
permit funds now held by the trustees of the Worcester Medical 
Library to be utilized in the acquisition of rare books. There was 
no dissent. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that preliminary work is pro- 
ceeding with respect to acquisition of land adjacent to the pro- 
posed site of the Medical School in V/orcester. The Syrian Church 
property is the first parcel. The church will sell, and has 
located another site; however, an appraisal of the land will now 
be required. 



it was 



After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



2717 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the firms of Archie Home and 
Maurice F. Reidy Company as appraisers for 
properties adjacent to the University of 
Massachusetts Medical School site in 
Worcester. 

The Treasurer reported that the H. E. Shaw building at 
the corner of Belmont and Lake Avenues would also require appraisal, 
as well as a contractors estimate of the cost of construction of 
the building. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Treasurer Johnson 
reported that Sasaki, Dawson and Demay had conducted a preliminary 
survey of the Madison and Highland Park areas. Although the ad- 
visability of an early discussion with Director Logue and Mayor 
Collins had been suggested at the previous meeting, both of these 
gentlemen have been unavailable. Nevertheless, things are moving. 

President Lederle reported that, after much discussion by 
campus housing administrators and considerable prior conversations 
within the Buildings and Grounds Committee, an across-the-board 
$350 residence hall rate for all dormitories seemed less desirable 
than one which would call for a $100 increase on the old dormitories 
and $50 on the newer University of Massachusetts Building Authority 
residence halls. Although some thought had been given to the idea 
of pooling the old University of Massachusetts Building Association 
revenues with new University of Massachusetts Building Authority 
revenues, it was felt not desirable to do that this year. The 
whole subject will receive further study and research. 



UM/B Site 
Developments 



Change in 
Residence 
Hall Rate 
Schedules 



it was 



After full discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 



VOTED : That the following votes be and hereby are 
recommended to the Board of Trustees: 

VOTED: That a trust fund be and hereby is 
established, under the name of 
"Residence Hall Trust Fund", for 
the operation of dormitories at the 
University, other than those dormi- 
tory and apartment facilities owned 
by University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Authority, and that the Treasurer 
of the University be and he hereby is 
designated as the person to receive 
and disburse income derived from such 
operation. 



2718 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED: 



VOTED: 



That the following be and hereby is 
established as the schedule of 
charges to be in effect for periods 
commencing on or after the beginning 
of the academic year in September 
1966 for occupancy of dormitory 
accommodations, other than those in 
University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority dormitories, at the Uni- 
versity, namely: 



Period of Time 


Charge 


Semester 


$150.00 


15 Weeks 


140.00 


14 Weeks 


131.00 


13 Weeks 


121.00 


12 Weeks 


112.00 


11 Weeks 


103.00 


10 Weeks 


93.00 


9 Weeks 


84.00 


8 Weeks 


75.00 


7 Weeks 


65.00 


6 Weeks 


56.00 


5 Weeks 


47.00 


4 Weeks 


37.00 


3 Weeks 


28.00 


2 Weeks 


19.00 


1 Week 


9.00 


Per Day 


1.50 



provided, however, that if and when- 
ever more than the design number of 
students shall be assigned to occupancy 
of dormitory accommodations, other 
than those in University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Authority dormi- 
tories for periods of more than foir 
weeks each, the charge per student 
for such occupancy during such 
period shall be 80% of the applicable 
charge stated above. 

That for occupancy of dormitory 
accommodations, other than those in 
University of Massachusetts Building 
dormitories and other than residence 
hall faculty apartments, equipped 
with telephones there be and hereby 
is established a supplemental charge 
of $12.50 per semester, prorated for 
shorter periods of occupancy. 



2719 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED: 



VOTED: 



That the charges established by the 
foregoing votes shall not be 
refundable to a student after he has 
occupied his assigned accommodation 
except upon certificate of the Dean 
of Students that such student has 
withdrawn from the University because 
of involuntary entry into military 
service or other reason of extreme 
emergency, the refund in such event 
to be the balance of the charge paid 
over that applicable to the period of 
actual occupancy plus one week. 

That the revenues derived from opera- 
tion of dormitories at the University, 
other than those owned by University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority, 
shall be applied as follows: 

1. So much of the revenue per structure 
as shall be required to meet the 
rental payable therefor by the 
Commonwealth shall be remitted to 
Treasurer and Receiver-General of 
the Commonwealth for the General 
Fund. 

2. The balance shall be applied to the 
cost of operating and maintaining 
dormitory facilities at the Uni- 
versity, including reimbursement to 
the Treasurer and Receiver-General 
of the Commonwealth expenditures, 
if any, from state appropriated 
funds in each fiscal year. 

3. . Revenue from supplemental charges 

for rooms equipped with telephones 
shall be applied to the cost of 
installation and service of such 
telephones. 



VOTED: 



That it be and hereby is recommended to 
University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority that the Authority establish 
schedules of charges of $175 per semester 
for accommodations in all dormitories 
owned by it and a refund policy identical 
with those established by the foregoing votes. 

The meeting was adjourned/ at 112: 15 p.m. 




Robert,^/. McCartney 
Secretary, ^Board of Trustees 



2720 



COMMITTEE 



Additional 

Honorary 

Degree 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

April 21, 1966, 12:15 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT : Vice Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Emerson, Haigis, lyons, Pumphret 
and Troy; Provost Tippo, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney 

In the absence of the Chairman, Vice Chairman Healey 
called the meeting to order at 12:15 p.m., and upon motion made 
and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the 

purpose of considering a candidate for 
an honorary degree. 

After appropriate discussion and approval of the person 
considered for the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws, it was 
moved, seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To come out of executive session for the 
purpose of continuing with the items on 
the agenda. 

After brief discussion, and with the consent of the Vice 
Chairman, the second item on the agenda, "Budget Transfers," was 
referred for discussion by the full Board of Trustees. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:25 p.m. 



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Robert t. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



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